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2

A couple of suggestions: (1) the EE stackexchange site a better home for this question (2) simply solve for the voltage across the capacitor and the current through the inductor. Once you have those, the energies stored, as a function of time are just $$W_L(t) = \frac{L}{2}i^2_L$$ and $$W_C(t) = \frac{C}{2}v^2_C$$ Since this is evidently a DC circuit ...


0

This is a potential difference. In power transmission, it's the RMS amplitude of a alternating signal.


0

Almost all electrical machines can be run in both ways (generator or motor). If you're talking about the direction of rotation, it will work too. However, your message is so vague, we can't help you : we don't have any clue about the kind of machine, about the frequency, voltage, use...


0

If your source has both a sinusoidal component and a constant (DC) component, simply perform two separate analyses - a DC analysis and an AC analysis. For the DC analysis, the sinusoidal component is zeroed and the (constant) voltages and currents are solved for (recall that capacitors are replaced with open circuit and inductors are replaced with wires). ...


1

DC bias is $A e^{i\theta} e^{i\omega t} = A e^{i\cdot 0} e^{i\cdot 0 t} = A$, however, quoting this, Phasors and Complex impedances are only relevant to sinusoidal sources.


2

A general answer which is not of any particular use is that electrical energy, and the forms in which we store it, are typically very low entropy systems. The lower the entropy the more they "want" to dissipate and the harder it is to stop that tendency to turn into (ultimately) heat. Same way that it is a lot easier to store water that is 10 degC above ...


0

There is another reason for capacitors in electronics (but probably not fans) and that is Power Factor Correction


1

Many fan motors are single phase, permanent split capacitor (PSC) induction motors. Single phase motors inherently have no starting torque and to get around this problem, engineers often "trick" the motor into thinking it is being supplied by 2 phases instead of one. This is done by adding a second set of windings to the motor that are physically offset to ...


3

A capacitor is often used for "decoupling". The wires into any electrical appliance have inductance (because they are long and thin). This means that if there is a sudden increased demand in current, there will be a significant voltage drop. A capacitor can act as a "tiny battery" that briefly supplies this current while the main supply catches up. A fan ...


2

What's probably happening here is the following: The fundamental or microscopic fields $\mathbf{E}$ and $\mathbf{B}$ are technically called the electric field strength and the magnetic induction, while $\mathbf{D}$ and $\mathbf{H}$, their macroscopic counterparts, are called the electric displacement and the magnetic field, a quite weird nomenclature, since ...


0

The only thing I can see them going for is the fact that only two of $\epsilon_0$, $\mu_0$ and $c$ are independent, and typically, a modern view will fold $\epsilon_{0}$ into the definition of charge, and declare $c$ to be the fundamental constant used to transform space into time in special relativity, making $\mu_{0}$ a prediction of the theory. I ...


-1

We need to create a battery that would instantly store a large amount of electricity at one time. Ex. When a bolt of lighting strikes it gives off a very large amount of power. However a battery needs time to take that energy and change it over to a chemical for storage. Lets say a bolt of lightning is 500 gallons of water and the battery that we ...



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