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To add to Floris's reply, just to elaborate in a very basic manner in what way the flux linkage (analogous of displacement x in Force Current analogy) and magnetic flux differ. Consider the scenario where a magnetic field is present, and we have an open circuit that has been closed using a metalic rod. As the picture shows: We know that the induced EMF ...


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I think there is something wrong with your mapping. Looking at http://lpsa.swarthmore.edu/Analogs/ElectricalMechanicalAnalogs.html , I see the following table: This is inconsistent with the mapping you are showing. I can understand this table - I can't understand yours. I think an error crept in - which would reasonably explain your confusion. Looking ...


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This is a very broad question, so my answer will necessarily be more generic. Electric fields are much easier to shield than magnetic fields. This is because most materials have low permeability and hence do a poor job of shielding magnetic fields. The same is not true for electric fields as any grounded metal will do a pretty good job. Many electronic ...


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It depends. Mostly there is very little effect because most parts of the circuit are either equi-potentials or under low impedance control with the electrical energy coupling in capacitively , which tens to be a very weak effect. It's only when you have very fast edges and high amplitudes that there is a noticeable effect - i.e. EMP - from a nuclear blast. ...


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A synchronous motor will not reduce in speed with increasing load until a certain load is reached. It will continue to run at the same speed, phased to the AC power line, until the torque demand exceeds what it can produce in that mode. At zero load, the voltage and current are out of phase, so the average electrical consumption is zero. As the load ...


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Capacitors, as used in electric circuits, do not store electric charge. When we say a capacitor is charged, we mean energy is stored in the capacitor and, in fact, energy storage is one application of capacitors. Now, for an ideal capacitor in a circuit context, the current through is proportional to the rate of change of the voltage across: $$i_C = C ...


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There are two main uses for capacitors. First, the discharge of a capacitor can provide a very large, brief current. You can charge a capacitor slowly using a low-current source, such as a battery. Then you throw a switch and connect the capacitor across a low-impedance load, a near short. All of the charge leaves the capacitor in a time of roughly $\tau = ...


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As @Benedikt already told, you can use them as fast battery. Furthermore, you can use them in a resonant circuit, or for powering small circuits without the need of an akkumulator. You can use them in high-pass- and low-pass-filters, too, for filtering out high or low frequencies.


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Think if a capacitor as a very small but very fast battery... And in digitals etc. every time something has to be stored a huge number of capacitors is used.


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In general the structure is more complex. Carriers for the 2D channel are provided by remote donors in a barrier. In addition, there can be a n-doped region at the surface, which facilitates electrical contacts but also saturates surface states in the channel region. Therefore this usually does not result in a conducting channel. By applying a gate ...



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