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The EV efficiency goes down very quickly with power output as $I^2R$ losses are mounting in the motor, the wiring, the power electronics and the batteries. Since an acceleration phase can only be so long (10-20s) and the car will not be used with constant velocity changes (unless it is designed for racing), the entire design will be optimized in such a way ...


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For what it's worth, lg310's seem to run a little cooler than gxb300's, at least on my roof. See also http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.egypro.2014.02.148 but read Table 4 carefully. The differences seem to be small.


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Note that the sum of two phasors is another phasor: $Ae^{j(wt+\phi_1)} + Be^{j(wt+\phi_2)} = Ce^{j(wt+\phi_3)}$ Where A,B,C are real. The only way for the real part of the right side to be equal to zero at all times is if $C=0$. In which case the whole thing is $0$, both the real and complex parts are 0. So a sum of phasors (of the full sinusoidal form ...


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When an electron collides with an atom or ion, it may • excite the atom/ion (I + e → $I^∗$ + e) • ionize the atom/ion (I + e → $I^+$ + 2e) • scatter inelastically (I + e → I + e + γ) • recombine radiatively (I + e → $I^−$ + γ) • recombine dielectronically (I + e → $I^−∗$) This memo will focus on the final process, where an electron recombines with the ion in ...


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Atoms whose outer shells are not filled will take on additional electrons. ie., the atoms in the insulating material will absorb the electron into it's own outer ring atomic structure. It has to do with the "octet theory" of the Bohr model. On the other hand, if you are talking about electron excitement, where one free electron frees another, as in a ...


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If you convert GDD to group velocity dispersion ($\beta_{2}$, ordinarily in units of fs$^{2}/$mm) then you can define both the dispersion length, which is the distance over which a Gaussian pulse broadens in the time domain by a factor of $\sqrt{2}$, and a chirp parameter, which describes how much second order dispersion has been applied to a Gaussian ...



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