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FWIW, "boron doping to a nominal level of 10^20 atoms/cm3 increases the expansion coefficient of Si over the range 293–550 K by 1.1×10^-8/K" (Journal of Vacuum Science & Technology A: Vacuum, Surfaces, and Films (Volume:9 , Issue: 4, p. 2231)(1991). I don't know about phosphorus-doped silicon, but probably CTE change due to doping at your level is also ...


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Your proposed setup is pretty close, except that it will also/mainly be sensitive to the classical (non-quantum) fluctuations in the power of the laser. The setup could be made more quantum-ey by adding a beamsplitter and an extra photodetector. Specifically, you have a laser, a 50:50 beamsplitter, and 2 detectors (one at each output port of the ...


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What effect are you looking for: Mr. Wizard, Rube Goldberg, or MacGyver? For a clean "Mr. Wizard" effect, use the cloud chamber that others have suggested. This has the simplest hardware setup of the three: put your radiation source by your cloud chamber, point your camera at it, and you're done. But the software will be considerably more difficult than the ...


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To add to Nathaniel's Answer because (1) it is a good answer and (2) I get nervous recommending radioactive materials handling to anybody I don't know: I would really think about the cloud chamber idea, especially since you're a software guy with a math background. It would need to be inside a darkened container, but you could run a webcam to show what is ...


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An alternative way to generate random numbers, that truly is quantum, and also quite easy: put a small radioactive source near a Geiger counter. Radioactive decay is a truly random event in the quantum sense, and is basically not subject to thermal noise at all. For maximum visual impact, replace the Geiger counter with a cloud chamber. That way you can ...


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If I understood correctly, what you are trying to build is a hardware based random number generator, where you want to use some quantum mechanics-based mechanism to supply the randomness. I'm no experimentalist, thus, take my comments with a grain of salt. Your suggestion is to use Schottky noise from a illuminated photodiode. I believe that it's a pretty ...


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It's called a diode because the device has two terminals. Devices that have three terminals are called triodes, and those with five pentodes. Words of that type have fallen by the wayside except in the realm of vacuum tube electronics ... except for the word diode, which has hung on. Note that the Wikipedia article that you cite refers specifically to ...


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The negative differential resistance creates a special phenomena: under a certain bias and certain incident electron energies, the transmission function through the double barrier is nearly zero. In other words, for a finite voltage domain, the current is nearly zero, i.e. a rectifying behaviour. This can be referred to as "generalized diode", since the ...



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