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The only real answer is: in parallel, because if one bulb burns, the other one still burns. That's the answer chosen for a lot of daily-life items (your home, car etc) where, if one item fails (like the hairdryer), the others (like the light bulbs) should still burn. This is not really the answer yet to what you have asked for, because your question is like:...


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Low power factor means that the load is shuttling energy repeatedly from and to the supply network. This is because the supply network is supplying energy to create magnetic / electric fields within the inductance and capacitance of the load over one half of the cycle, and that energy is being returned from the load to the supply network over the other half ...


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Let me tell you the most known phenomenon. You may try this even at home. Take a metallic tumbler and put your mobile phone in it then close the lid so that no part is exposed out of the metallic container. Now with another mobile try calling your first one. You should not be able to connect to the mobile inside the tumbler. This is called shielding. Here ...


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Well, assuming they are bright enough to affect the other light, then, it will depend upon if they have exactly identical timing or not. Theoretically, with identical timing and mechanism, they should blink. Even a tiny fraction of a second difference will be important. If one light switches on a fraction earlier, the other one will stay switched off. The ...


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Assuming that each sensor sees only the light from the other night light, and assuming that each night lights is bright enough to reliably trigger the other's sensor, then you have discovered a configuration that computer engineers call a "flip-flop". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flip-flop_%28electronics%29 It has another name, "bistable multivibrator." "...


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Interesting question. What you have arrived on is a classic conundrum. Let me make my argument clear through a few scenarios. First, is the light from the nightlight bright enough to affect itself? I mean, if the light is turned on, won't the environment become bright again and hence and trigger a change? I am assuming it does not work that way. Second, ...


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just decelerates and finally stops because of heat-induced physical deformations; because the load is always against the power of the engine. The engine always has limited work ability because of limited energy and so power.



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