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Even if the circuit has no resistance(which isn't possible as every wire has some finite non-negligible resistance $\rho L /A $), the source will have some internal resistance causing the circuit to have resistance, after which you can use Ohm's law to find the current. Though it isn't recommended to connect two ends of a battery together.(It reduces the ...


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if you were to have say a 5V source connected directly to ground, no components in the circuit at all, you would need to add resistance for the current to flow? No, for sure current will flow. If nothing resists the electrons, they will keep speeding up. Current $I$ will keep rising. Power will keep increasing, $P=VI$. For really no resistance, ...


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When you ask questions about things "in the limit", the answer is almost always "It depends". In this case, the answer is "it depends". The equation $Q=CV$ assumes linear behavior of the capacitor - in reality the dielectric of most capacitors has hysteresis as well as a nonlinear component, so as you increase the voltage, the capacitance will change. This ...


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First, I'm a bit confused by your statement about two batteries. The capacitance of a two-sided capacitor is defined to be the ratio of the magnitude of separated charge (commmonly, the magnitude of charge on each plate) to the resultant potential difference (aka, voltage) between the plates. It's technically a "what if" formula. The actual capacitance ...


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Batteries are not capacitors. Closing the switch doesn't redistribute some fixed amount of charge in the circuit. Instead, the batteries can create new charge through chemical reactions. The redistribution would slightly lower the potential, allowing the chemical reaction to proceed until it comes back to the resting voltage. While real batteries are ...


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Just get 3 steel plate and rust one of them with a solding iron and touch the tip of the 2 steel plate on the rust. This is a pnp transistor


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Your calculation is basically correct. If a battery is rated at 9.88WHrs it will produce a power of 1 Watt for 9.88 hours, or 8 Watts for 1.235 hours. However the power rating depends on what current the battery is producing. There will be an optimal current that gives the highest capacity, and the battery power rating is calculated for this optimum ...


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you asked this a while ago, but I found it while searching for a similar question about HEMTs of my own. @engineer's answer for your first part is good but I think I can answer both, and more fully. Hopefully it'll be of help to someone else if you're past this now. A diagram from John Davies' "Physics of Low Dimensional Semiconductors" is very helpful for ...



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