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There is a sort of analog called gravitomagnetism (or gravitoelectromagnetism), but it is not discussed that often because it applies only in a special case. It is an approximation of general relativity (i.e. the Einstein Field Equations) in the case where: The weak field limit applies. The correct reference frame is chosen (it's not entirely clear to me ...


8

The answer by @NowIGetToLearnWhatAHeadIs is correct. It's worth learning the language used therein to help with your future studies. But as a primer, here's a simplified explanation. Start with your charge distribution and a "guess" for the direction of the electric field. As you can see, I made the guess have a component upward. We'll see shortly why ...


8

You have to realize that the system is invariant under rotations about the normal to the plane. Then then electric field must also be invariant under these rotations. An electric field component in the plane does change under such a rotation, so such a component must not exist if we have this invariance. Thus the electric field is purely along the normal to ...


4

There is a gravitational analogue of the magnetic field. See gravitoelectromagnetism and frame dragging on Wikipedia.


3

There aren't E and B fields in the entire universe. For example, there are no electric fields inside a conductor. I'm sure there are quite a few other such examples. If you mean "why are there electromagnetic waves throughout the entire universe?", one answer is because the radiation field drops like $1/r$, so the field from a single source never ...


2

I solved my problem numerically, using the diffusion equation $\frac{\partial V}{\partial t} = -k\nabla^2 V$, with the following boundary conditions: Voltage at point D is fixed at 1.0 Voltage along the vertical line halfway between points A and D is fixed at 0.5 (voltage at point A is 0.0, use symmetry so we don't have to simulate the left half of the ...


2

One: I honestly don't know. I was already hard for me to find this experiment in german - although german is my mother tongue. ^^ I finally succeeded with Ringentladung, which I tried to translate into english but the only thing I could find is this. Maybe a native speaker can help here? Two: The electric discharge - which causes the gas in ...


1

Counterexample: An electromagnetic plane wave in free space (no charge or current) at a fixed frequency and linear polarization has oscillating electric field in one (unsigned) direction normal to direction of propagation. These field lines are not closed. Note: Although Maxwell's equation is "Faraday's equation plus other stuff", adding more equation ...


1

I agree with the result, but I would like explain another more general and rapid approach. Because of the radius of the hole is negligible with respect to the radius of the sphere, and the only posible direction for E compatible with the symmetry is the z axis, and finally having in mind that the tangencial components of E are continuous, the solution is ...


1

Pick a point above the plane. From a point in the plane directly under the point above, draw a circle of some radius. Consider the contribution of the charge elements along the circle to the electric field at the point above the plane. Since the charge density is uniform, the horizontal components of the electric field from charge elements on opposite ...


1

An answer connected to Gauss law (I hope everything is correct, since it's long ago for me ... so no warranty): An infinite plane of uniform charge for example in the z-plane has the charge distribution: $\rho=q\,\delta(z)$ Thus, the electrostatic potential should be $\Phi=\frac{q\,|z|}{2\pi}$. Hence, the electric vectorfield is: ...



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