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You could try something like this. Suppose you have two electrons in the singlet state. You can measure the electron's spin along three directions x,y,z. Regardless of the direction you measure the spin the probability of getting up or down is 1/2. If you measure the x spin of both electrons when you compare the results you find that they are opposite: if ...


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It was already mentioned by Carl Witthoft, but I think the ocarina does count, as long as you're not too hung up on the resonance chamber being a tube as such. From Wikipedia: The ocarina, unlike other vessel flutes, has the unusual quality of not relying on the pipe length to produce a particular tone. Instead the tone is dependent on the ratio of the ...


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You don't explicitly state you are looking for a wind instrument so perhaps a drum would count. Perhaps a snare drum since the snare is on the resonant (non-struck) head or a kettle drum maybe qualifies as a pitched instrument. If you are looking for a wind instrument in particular and Carl Witthoft's suggestions of the ocarina or the jug do not fit the ...


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Well, does playing flute-like across the top of a beer bottle count? Or, better put: a jug-player in a country "Jug band" plays his instrument that way. It's also your call whether blocked instruments with holes along the length qualify, such as an ocarina. I sort of guess what you're looking for is an instrument with an air pocket as the resonance, as ...


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While the field is $\vec F = q\vec v \times \vec B$, it is not a terribly intuitive process. The closest one comes to a vector-product in the real world is the Coralis force, where the wind goes clockwise around a low, and anticlockwise around a high. A moving charge sets up a circular magnetic field, which is one direction or the other, depending on the ...


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Suppose that you knew about the Coulomb interaction between charges. Now imagine a wire with a current, and let the wire be at rest. This means that the ions in the wire are at rest, but the conduction electrons have a net velocity. The wire is electrically neutral. Then if there is a charge in motion outside the wire, there should be no force on it, you ...


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The direction of the Lorentz Force is given by the right hand rule and arises because of this vector cross product: $\vec{F} = q\vec{v}$ x $\vec{B}$ An intuitive approach to this is: The $e^-$ will always tend to move from an area of high potential to low potential. Hope this makes it clearer to see why the electron moves to the direction it does.


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Probably demonstration is better than explanation. The trick, I think, is finding slick surfaces. An ice rink might do, or a smooth floor on well-greased wheels. Air hockey tables remove friction with pneumatics. Newton's laws of motion are intuitive, I think, in a frictionless environment. (This is why "driving on ice" is so often invoked by adults to get ...



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