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If you have a good grasp on the relative scales of other things in physics, you may be able to relate the wavelengths to those. Otherwise, your best bet is just to memorize the wavelengths (or frequencies). Since $f = \frac{c}{\lambda}$ for light, you'll be able to figure out the frequencies if you know the wavelengths. Here are some things I use to help ...


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Since you are at the university now, you could register to take the classes offered by the university in the seven fields you listed. Each class will have it's own recommendations for textbooks. There are no magical textbooks. What really helps is to have a good teacher (hopefully the professor/instructor in class) who can explain the difficult points along ...


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The "Problem book in relativity and gravitation" is free online here -- legally, from the authors. It's got a pretty broad variety of questions, along with solutions. It is a little on the old side, but many of the problems are just as relevant today. But I don't think there's much that can compare to MTW.


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I would get Wald. That's the standard text for the field. It has a small number of problems, but they're very good. I would recommend downloading homework problems from other schools, for example MIT opencourseware. It seems to be the trend that for GR the most popular textbooks are not problem-heavy. One neat book that is dedicated to problems is the ...


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For what it's worth, you might want to look up the original paper on the theory of helical diffraction: "The structure of synthetic polypeptides. I. The transform of atoms on a helix" W. Cochran, F. H. Crick and V. Vand, (1952) Acta Crystallographica 5, 581-86. This is the seminal work that allowed Crick and Watson to deduce the DNA structure. It is not a ...



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