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Some years ago, Gerard 't Hooft posted "How to Become a Good Theoretical Physicist", which is more inclusive than just string theory but which you'll probably still find a valuable list. Here's what he recommends for mathematics: "Primary Mathematics": Natural numbers: 1, 2, 3, … Integers: …, -3, -2, -1, 0, 1, 2, … Rational numbers (fractions): ...


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It really depends on what you want to research within string theory, but it's one of most mathematically intensive areas within physics. List a mathematical discipline, and chances are you can apply it within string theory. At a bare minimum, you'll need everything through quantum field theory and general relativity, which includes calculus of variations, ...


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"Theory of Elasticity" by Timoshenko and Goodier has explanations of a lot of solid mechanics of isotropic solids in the elastic regime. Also useful for the same general area is "Theory of Elasticity" by Landau and Lifshitz. If you find them rather heavy going then "Electromechanics and MEMS" by Jones and Nenadic has easier derivations of some particular ...


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I came across this one recently. It had a good chapter on stress and strain with a lot of derivation. Coming from Physics, not Engineering, it was a good primer. Lots of equations, derivations and prose. Polymer Engineering Science and Viscoelasticity: An Introduction By Hal F. Brinson, L. Catherine Brinson http://www.springer.com/us/book/9781489974846 ...


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The American Association Institute of Physics (AIP; the parent organization of the APS and AAPT among others) publishes The Physics Teacher, which publishes articles on pedagogy and exposition. Their blurb reads: Dedicated to the strengthening of the teaching of introductory physics at all levels, The Physics Teacher provides peer-reviewed materials to ...


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Reviews of Modern Physics has been created exactly with that scope, as you can see in the link. Feynman's article on the path integral approach, for example, was published on this journal. Physics Reports is similar to Rev. Mod. Phys. albeit the article submission is by invitation only. Reports on Progress in Physics is another one.


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I'm not sure if this is what you're looking for, but physics news websites, like phys.org and nature news are really good for "exposition" of different topics. I'm a PhD student in physics and I use phys.org and nature news and views (http://www.nature.com/subjects/physics#news-and-views) to have a non-technical source for other physical subjects and if I'm ...


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Believe me, if you haven't studied either yet, special relativity will be enough to blow your mind. Learning it will keep your curiosity peaked and hopefully lead you to learning new math and more physics to the point where one day you are ready to study general relativity.


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Before learning general relativity you need to learn special relativity,classical mechanics,electromagnetism,fluid mechanics,tensors,differential geometry first. this is the way we physics majors learn general relativity. We learn ofcourse quantum mechanics,statistical mechanics,optics too,but these are not directly necessary as far as I know ,but to ...


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Edwin F. Taylor and John Archibald Wheeler, Spacetime Physics: Introduction to Special Relativity, 2nd ed. W. H. Freeman & Company, 1992. In print, ISBN 0-7167-2326-3, list price $26.00 (hardcover) Simply the best introduction you could get. You want to start with SR. Make sure you have a good grounding in Classical "Newtownian" Physics first, as well ...


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Can I make GR my starting point, and look at SR later as a special case of GR? This would be like making differential geometry your starting point and then learning linear algebra as a special case --- or learning calculus as your starting point and then learning about straight lines as a special case. In other words, it's insane.



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