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2

Your error is to assume that only your red charges generate the heat, ie the red charges go through area $A$ and they are not replaced by any other charges. If that were the case then the factor of $\frac 12$ would be correct. However as the red charges move through the resistor black charges to the left of the red charges would move into the resistor and ...


1

Since you equate $W$ with $NqU$, that means $W$ represents the amount of energy dissipated as heat during the time interval $N$ charges passed through the cross section. That time interval is $t / 2$, so the resulting power is $P = {{UIt / 2} \over {t / 2}} = UI$.


3

Tell him how to build an atomic bomb. Kids loves it. In principle: Start with a shocking and dangerous idea. Show him an exciting experiment and explain this. Make him do something what requires new knowledge. For example: Tell him about space exploration, that he can do it by himself, build a model rocket with him, Teach him the Newtonian dynamics ...


5

10th grade is 15/16 years old right? Even if i'm more for a theoretical approach I think that age should be the age of experiments. He clearly doesn't have the mathematical background to do "real" theoretical physics. They just probably try to shove formulas into his head without explanations. I advice you to keep going with these kind of experiments, maybe ...


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Whatever you're supposed to do on this, you first need to understand quantum theory in curved spacetimes, and the ADM method in general relativity (which is basically the Hamiltonian approach to general relativity), and there are always issues as to what is the time coordinate you choose, and since it is not invariant what does it mean. In FRW the time is ...


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A suggestion would be to include straight standing lines that represent buildings. And also include the angle of the rays of the sun with respect to the horizontal ground at a specific time. And compare using the known angle from the ground, whether it is really the converging rays, or parallel rays that will produce such projections: The angle can be ...


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It's just a case of a perspective. I've just modeled it in blender to see how it should look like making sure that the beams are perpendicular. That's what i get.My model is not perfect but you see what's going on.


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To get a full account of this buy the Dover edition of the book by van de Hulst "Light Scattering by Small Particles." This involves Mie scattering, which is more general than Rayleigh scattering at the red or IR regime. The scattering has intensity lobes, similar to antenna lobes in electromagnetic applications, and what these crepuscular rays are the ...


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LIGO actually has a really nice step-by-step tutorial on this: https://losc.ligo.org/s/events/GW150914/GW150914_tutorial.html It is in python, but should be accessible There is more in LIGO Open Science Center: https://losc.ligo.org/tutorials/


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Alright so the LIGO collaboration has established a multitude of software for doing this. lalsuite One of the more commonly used ones is lalsuite. Some examples: lalsim-detector-noise --aligo-zerodet-highpower -s 1000000000 -t 16 > noise lalsim-inspiral | lalsim-detector-strain -D H1 -a 1:23:45 -d 45.0 -p 30.0 -t 1000000008 > signal lalsim-...


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A routine internet search for introductory material comes up with several possibilities. If you merely wish to read about the ideas in these topics you may not need any mathematics at all. eg "String Theory and Quantum Gravity for Dummies" in the "Dummies" Series. Also the more academic but briefer introduction : "Quantum Gravity for Dummies" http://arxiv....


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Start with a good math background. Work your way through elementary calculus. These ideas in calculus were derived FOR physics. Once you can get a good grasp on the principles of calculus physics will come a lot easier. I enjoy watching YouTube videos on these things. A great amount of information for free


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Besides his famous three-volume textbooks, Feynman gave the 1964 Messenger Lectures at Cornell to an "advanced layperson" audience. I'd guess you'd find them interesting (and the price is right:)... http://people.virginia.edu/~ecd3m/1110/Fall2014/The_Character_of_Physical_Law.pdf And (some of) those lectures also seem to be on youtube... https://www....



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