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If I understand the question right, we suppose we want to prove to someone that the earth orbits the sun. I'm not quite sure that' the case from a scientific point of view. Literally speaking, we can choose any reference frame we like and thus prove a heliocentric system or a or a geocentric. Quoting Einstein:" The struggle, so violent in the early days ...


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If all you are looking for is a basic introduction without the calculus of variations, then the following article (which, however, assumes knowledge of elementary calculus as a prerequisite) may be of help: Hanc, Jozef, Edwin F. Taylor, and Slavomir Tuleja. "Deriving Lagrange’s equations using elementary calculus." American Journal of Physics 72.4 (2004): ...


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Maybe you can give a rough idea about what the subject is about. You can introduce first for example the Fermat's principle of least time and maybe kind of make an analogy like. "There is a similar principle of minimization in mechanics where you minimize another quantity called action". Maybe if an student is interested you can give him more information. ...


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The most fundamental parts of Lagrangian mechanics involve calculus. The action principle involves an integral and the Euler-Lagrange equation is a partial differential equation. Unless the students are pretty good with calculus it will be quite hard to teach.


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I really recommend 4 books in 3 steps 1)Mathematics for physics, Michael Stone Paul Goldbart 2)Modern Mathematical Physics, Peter Szekeres 3)Geometry for Physics, T. Frankel with An introduction to Manifolds, Loring W. Tu After all, The Road to Reality, Roger Penrose


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For the most part, you are right. Physics is tough, and in many ways high school physics is the hardest because it is the first introduction to a new and difficult way of thinking. Furthermore, teachers are under pressure to complete the curriculum. And there's always the possibility that the teacher him/herself does not have a firm grasp of the subject. ...


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sorry to hear that things are frustrating. I don't think you need the Huygen principle for the double slit experiment. Take a look at the diagram below... The diagram shows two rays from a double slit experiment. The path lengths are slightly different from the two slits. In one case the waves arrive in phase and you get the bright fringe - constructive ...


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It is an edge dislocation. Compare: to: TEM tracks dislocations in graphene Notice that the yellow loops have 5 and 7 edges, respectively, compared to the usual six.


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A firm understanding of classical physics is essential. This means understanding the qualitative and quantitative aspects of: 1) Newton's three laws of motion (Kinematic and Dynamic perspective) 2) Rotational motion dynamics 3) Electromagnetism 4) Newtonian mechanics (Newtonian gravity) 5) Principle of superposition and waves 6) Classical thermal ...



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