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8

Definitely not too late! I've known graduate students in physics entering anywhere between 20 and 30, and I know there are even older and younger out there. Even better, it's not like information technology is a completely irrelevant- in physics (particularly high energy physics) we routinely deal with big data and I'm sure you could apply some of what you ...


7

If I compare your case (which is similar to mine) I will graduate when I'm 27 and then I can start a phd so i will be 31 years young :) If you love what you do, just do it ! eventually it will be worth it !


7

I begun a Computer science degree at 24, and at the end of the first year I decided that I really liked studying Physics far more than IT. I wanted to switch to a physics degree but I wasn't qualified enough and had to do a year long science foundation program first. Undeterred, I took the course and 5 Years later I had an MSC in Physics. Last year (after a ...


3

I am recent graduated physicist. Assuming that you are looking for rigorous learning instead of just popular science, I would like to recommend a few books to get started in this amazing field of knowledge. Before you learn some hard Calculus, you can read this books: Physics for Scientist and Engineers. Tipler & Mosca. This books are the easiest ...


2

This could be probably the closest one that I know: Data Analysis in High Energy Physics: A Practical Guide to Statistical Methods Olaf Behnke (Editor), Kevin Kroninger (Editor), Gregory Schott (Editor), Thomas Schorner-Sadenius (Editor) ISBN: 978-3-527-41058-3 http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-3527410589.html Especially Chapter 11 is ...


1

As others have stated, it really depends on why you want to learn quantum mechanics, and how deeply you want to learn it. (1) If you want to learn it as badly as you want to watch a movie at the movie theaters (i.e. not that badly - you're just mildly interested), then I'd recommend, aside from the books already mentioned, Mr. Tompkins in Paperback by ...


1

Here's a paper for you to ponder on: Teaching electromagnetic field theory using differential forms Excerpt from the abstract: computational simplifications result from the use of forms: derivatives are easier to employ in curvilinear coordinates, integration becomes more straightforward, and families of vector identities are replaced by ...


1

As someone who did a degree in physics before moving into electronics and s/w R&D, my experience would suggest "yes". Over the years I have been involved in a number of projects that could be classified as experimental physics, and in all cases knowledge of electronics was a vital part. At the very least a physicist should be able to read a circuit ...



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