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If you want research-level physics papers about topics high school students can understand, your best bet might be to look to the past. Older papers are great fun to read, but with their archaic language and notation they're not always the most efficient way to learn. One famous exception is Einstein's 1905 classic On the Electrodynamics of Moving Bodies. ...


11

It seems to me Fermi's 1949 paper On the origin of the cosmic radiation (pdf copy link) is fairly accessible, requiring basic E&M and conservation of energy & momentum. The paper was written as a proposal for a mechanism to accelerate cosmic rays from thermal velocities to relativistic ones. The mechanism he proposes (based on Alfven waves) ...


8

I'll give it a try: Jesse L. Silverberg, Matthew Bierbaum, James P. Sethna, and Itai Cohen, Phys. Rev. Lett. 110, 228701 (2013): "Collective Motion of Humans in Mosh and Circle Pits at Heavy Metal Concerts". (I got the idea from a Sixty Symbols video.) http://journals.aps.org/prl/abstract/10.1103/PhysRevLett.110.228701 It's not written by someone famous ...


4

First let me repeat what Yvan Velenik says in the comment: The terminology is somewhat unfortunate, because you don't need that much statistics, rather you'll need some probability theory. To elaborate, quoting Wikipedia, Statistics is the study of the collection, analysis, interpretation, presentation, and organization of data. [...] Statistics deals ...


4

As noted in P. Weinberger's revisit of Louis de Broglie's 1924 doctoral thesis: De Broglie's contribution in the Philosophical Magazine from 1924 is fascinating from many standpoints: for its moderate use of mathematics, the close connection to Einstein's special theory of relativity, and of course for the proposal of matter waves. We revisit ...


3

I'm going to be perverse and suggest Blas Cabrera's "First Results from a Superconductive Detector for Moving Magnetic Monopoles" (Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 1378 (1982).) Cabrera isn't a household name, of course, but this does have some advantages as a teaching paper: First, the experiment is dead simple to explain to students who know about EMFs and ...


3

How can I learn to become an experimental physicist? Bold mine. To start with, one has to become a physicist, and that is the goal of undergraduate physics majors, supply the basic understanding of physics up to the time of study, the experimental results and the theoretical models within which the results make sense. This is a serious job and it is ...


2

You might be interested to have a look at the the site The Universe in Problems. This is a community maintained web site, so the problems are very variable in style and difficulty. The downside of this is that many of the problems will not suit your current level of expertise, but on the other hand the upside is that there is bound to be some fraction of ...


1

All these links are accessible at a non-mathematical level, and they are by recognized scientists (with the exception of the first link). (1) To start, see the "Simple English Wikipedia", which explains what the Higgs effect is, and the reason for the Higgs effect: http://simple.wikipedia.org/wiki/Higgs_field. (2) The difference between the Higgs boson and ...



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