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6

Terrific question. You had it right in your first sentence: “the same amount of energy must have been released during the Earth's history,” but then it gets a little mixed up when you look at various energies, some of which aren’t related to the question at hand (for example, the current internal energy contributes positive mass-energy to the Earth, rather ...


2

The rest of the energy went into space. Without that energy loss the planet would not even have condensed and the gas/dust cloud would have stayed a cloud. Having said that, the details of these condensation processes in planetary clouds seem to be non-trivial and, from what I have read, are not fully understood, as of yet.


1

The rainbow needs sun and rain. Normally during the rain there is no sunlight. After the rain there is generally still rainfall but it has moved away. If the sun has come out where you are and strikes the rain that is moving away from you at the right angle then you will see a rainbow. rainbow reference for more details.


0

People who are studying something something generally use a frame of reference which is reasonably close to the things of interest. While it might in theory be possible to measure the stature of a man by very accurately determining the distance from the center of the Earth to the bottoms of his feet, as well as the distance from the center of the earth to ...


1

Earth is rotating on its own axis & also revolves around the Sun, then how come the Sun always rises in the East? Earth orbits around the Sun, but the motion can be expressed equivalently in Earth reference frame as Sun orbiting Earth. The orbital speed is not perfectly uniform, but close enough not to be distinguishable in normal life. Earth also ...


-1

(image credit: Gdr@Wikimedia) Essential answer, assuming the observer near Earth’s equator, is: When the Sun rises, the observer is near the centre of the leading Earth hemisphere (upper side of the blue disk in the image), and east points towards the Sun. At noon, the Sun is above the observer, and east points backward, against the orbital motion. At ...


4

The question is quite geocentric, as it is dependent on the observer's location. On Venus, which has a retrograde axis of rotation, the Sun appears to rise in the West. In Arctic regions, the Sun may not rise or set for up to six months of the year, and even then, it may not be clear in exactly which direction the sunrise/sunset occurs. Other suns in the ...


2

At first ask yourself the question what do you mean by "East"? Other answers have already said that why you should only concentrate on earth spin rather than its orbital motion towards that sun. See North, East, West and South are not absolute directions and changes with the latitude and longitude. So wherever you are on the earth surface, depending on ...


1

It looks like the Sun rises in east and set in west, but actually it is altogether vice versa. Our earth rotates around the sun in west to east fashion. Since we see ourselves as stationary in our frame of reference(i.e. earth), the sun seems to rise and set in east to west fashion. Similarly we have winter and summer as seasons due to the revolution of ...


29

Whether the sun "rises" in the east depends on your position on earth, and the time of the year. In northern latitudes, during the summer, the sun rises significantly North of East, and in the winter it rises in the South. For example, today's sunrise/sunset directions in Umeå Sweden, look like this (source: www.suncalc.net) The yellow line shows the ...


15

The Sun does not rise, it is the horizon that goes down. You say that Sun rises in the East (with a certain degree of oscillations due to the tilt of the axis) just because the Earth spins from West to East. The revolution affects the difference between sidereal time and solar time, and makes the solar day $\approx 4$ minutes longer If the Earth spinned in ...


5

It takes a year for Earth to revolve around the Sun, and only one day to rotate about itself. That is why you can, for most practical purposes, forget about the revolution (which causes the different seasons) and concentrate only on the rotation, at least fo sun raising purposes.


1

In Earth's crust, 80% heat is contributed by Radioactive Elements and 20% are leftover heat from the planet's creation process. As for the core (having temperature higher than that of surface of Sun) and mantle, very little is known. There are leftover heat (which hasn't escaped yet because Tactonic plates act as insulator), heat from enormous radioactive ...



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