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11

You certainly could define your origin of coordinates to be the center of the Earth. It would be a little tricky, because this would no longer be an inertial frame of reference, so there would be fictitious forces (or Coriolis forces). That is, your equations of motion would no longer look the same. One reason the standard barycenter frame of reference is ...


10

Back before Copernicus (Or rather, before his view was accepted), we used to think the earth was the center of our solar system. Therefore, if you search for those models, you can find examples such as: This is, of course, based on observations rather than calculations, but it represents the complication of the solution nonetheless. (Image taken from ...


4

In the following the term "charge" refers either to mass or to electric charge and the term "Inverse Square Law" refers either to Newton's Gravitational Law or to Coulomb's Law respectively. SECTION 1 A. The Inverse Square Law for Spheres with uniform surface charge density Proposition A : Let a sphere of radius $\:\rm{R}\:$ with uniform surface ...


3

Since a new moon has to have the sun shine on the entire surface facing away from the Earth, the time between 2 new moons is the time for the Earth Moon system to complete a synodic period. The period of two masses around the common center of mass is always the same.


3

If we consider the earth as an isolated system there are no reasons to have our planet to change its angular momentum, due to conservation of the latter. However if we consider the earth and its neighbourhood we have that the earth is actually decelerating because of the Moon. The Moon has an orbital period longer then the rotational period of the earth, ...


1

The Earth and the Moon revolve about their barycenter (center of mass of the Earth/Moon system), which is inside the Earth and is about 4,670 Km from the center of the Earth on a line connecting the center of the Earth with the center of the Moon (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barycentric_coordinates_(astronomy)). The apocenter of the Moon is its center when ...



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