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1

Because the experimental set up is made with vertical slits. Generally these slits are far taller than the separation between them. When the experimental set up is made with pinholes you will get circular interference patterns. Try doing both, just get a toy laser pointer and start making slits and pinholes.


0

The answer I gave before was wrong, as was kindly pointed out by CuriousOne. The fading of the intensity isn't because of the $1/r^2$ fall-off of light, since the diffraction formulas are only for small angles anyway. First of all, it's clear from the second figure in the question that the only relevant thing is the diffraction and not the interference; ...


0

This page has a good simple summary of the experiment, they present the following simple schematic of a delayed choice quantum eraser (the same as Figure 1 in the original paper by Kim et al.): In this case, if the entangled "idler photon" is detected by Alice at D3 or D4 then she will know whether the "signal photon" went through slit A or slit B, but if ...


-4

This phenomena is present in every measurement. If you measure the voltage in a wire your instrument has to have a high but not endless high resistance. The current flowing thru this instrument makes the measurement a little bit uncertain. The same happens if you measure the current. A little more sophisticated is it if you want to measure photons. You can ...


2

Having multiple observers trying to do different observations to ascertain all properties of the particle at the same time will not make any difference. The fact of the matter is that the position and the momentum of a particle cannot be well-defined at the same instant in time. This follows from the wave-particle duality that applies to all particles, and ...


3

I think maybe it's just a bad photo. The double slit diffraction pattern is a convolution of the pattern from a pair of delta functions with that of a single slit. i.e. You have the regularly spaced double slit pattern, but this is modulated by the pattern produced by a single slit of width equal to that of the slits used for your double slit experiment. In ...


0

The first picture looks like a theoretical curve of whatever, the photo is from a single-slit experiment. Have a look on this photo, where you can see that a double-slit has fringes with swelling intensity and dimensions. If you go back to start from the easiest case you have to look on a edge. Behind an edge you see half the picture from your photo. Now ...


0

You are right. In the interference pattern produced by two narrow slits (e.g young's double slit experiment), the width of all the fringes (bright, dark and central) is same. The picture you have added is not of double slit experiment, it is of single slit experiment.


-1

Take - if you want - in your mind the fact that even a edge interact with a light source (a monochromatic point source give the best results) by the way that you could see fringes on a display behind the edge. So you have to ask why there is an area between shadow an "no shadow" which contains fringes. The answer is: Because the interaction between the ...


1

Yes, most certainly the shape of each slit affects the diffraction and interference patterns. I admit up front to being too lazy to write out the generalized solution, but if you grab any decent optics text, you'll get the integral formulas for the patterns as a function of slit shape. Qualitatively, you can see that a 'slanted' single slit will produce a ...



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