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What experiments should be done to test a theory depends on both the theory and its rivals. At some point, somebody may come up with a better theory. The crucial experiments will then depend on where quantum theory and its rival differ. If you're asking about quantum physics versus classical physics, there are many experiments where they would make ...


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If a lump is supposed to react to the state of a hole, then the lump must know about the state of the hole. If the lump has no ability to see its surroundings, then the only way for the lump to make sure that it could go through a hole is to actually go through the hole. assumption that electron has no sight + observation that electron seems to know about ...


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The reason why they put equations in is because physics is best described in terms of equations. They tried to remove randomness with equation, ultimately believing that QM is not that random, that it is behaving according to certain parameters. They tried to set the boundaries in the randomness/unpredictability, but the equations still couldn't remove the ...


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Since the two slit experiment is a bit complicated for what I'm about to discuss, allow me to consider a simplified toy model. Consider an $N$ component state vector $| \alpha \rangle $, about to be acted on by some operation, and subsequently measured. This evolution can be represented by: $$| \beta \rangle = U |\alpha\rangle$$ The important bit here is ...


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Assuming our only aim is to solve double slit experiment (or other problems that can be mapped into that). Actually the double slit experiment for electrons is a derivative/prediction from the quantum mechanical theory as it started with the Schrodinger equation ,its wavefunction solutions and the interpretation of differential operators with energy ...


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You say that we are only interested in the probability distribution on the screen, $\rho(x,t) = \lvert \psi(x,t) \rvert^2$, which is essentially correct. So, why do we have $\psi(x,t) = \lvert\psi(x,t)\rvert\mathrm{e}^{\frac{\mathrm{i}}{\hbar}S(x,t)}$? Well, looking at the time evolution equation for the probability density, the continuity equation of ...


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The non-negative real probability distribution can't interfere like a complex wave function can. To produce interference phenomena it is necessary for quantum mechanics to deal with probability amplitudes, not just probabilities.


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First at all light is electromagnetic radiation. To produce EM radiation you need excited electrons (or protons or some of this stuff), they emit photons. The light you see is thermal radiation from sun, laser, LED, light bulb. Then ever one detect light in detail he will end with the detection of photons. The first who claimed that light consists of quanta ...


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The experiment is meant to show the wave-particle duality of light. When light goes through a slit, it is attracted gravitationally by the side-walls of the slit and seems to curve around the exit corners. Since light is radially projected, some light smears along the sidewall of the slit also and is refracted, though this amount of light is negligible when ...


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She means to say that it would behave as if both the slits were open and fall on the screen according to the double slit pattern. The entire double slit pattern comes from interference.


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The complex Euclidean norm $\left| \cdot \right|_2$ considered here is calculated by $$ \left| \varphi \right|_2 = \varphi\varphi^* $$ where $\varphi\in\mathbb{C}^n$ and the $^*$ denotes complex conjugation. Then, since $$ \left(\psi_1 + \psi_2\right)^* = \psi_1^* + \psi_2^* $$ one has \begin{align} \left|\psi_1 + \psi_2\right|_2 &= ...


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Whether it needs to be done in the dark depends on the detection method. Most electron detectors are very sensitive to light, so you want to make sure no photons generate noise on your detector. For example, a scintillator screen + film is sensitive to light (could cover the scintillator with light proof material but risk stopping the electrons when you do ...


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How the collapse works, we don't know, there are theories and theories. We believe that the interaction with the macroscopic apparatus is what collapses the wave-function. But if this is all the truth behind the collapse, we don't know. We have reasons to believe that the collapse is a non-local phenomenon, and that our macroscopic apparatuses interact ...


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Wave interference patterns are created with more than one opening for the particle to pass through. With only one slit, the wave passing through it would not meet another wave beyond the screen to interfere with it. Imagine it like the waves produced by dropping a pebble into a calm body of water. When the uniform ripples get to the screen with two slits in ...


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Yes. This is called Delayed-choice Double-slit Experiment first thought by physicist John Wheeler. Its result is that our present observations/ actions affect the past. When you observe/ close one slit after photon (or, any other Quantum denizen) has passed it (based on calculation), the two-slit interference pattern doesn’t form. It acts like it passed ...


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The amplitude should be proportional to the width. In single slit diffraction calculations, the resultant amplitude is obtained by dividing the slit width into a large number of equal segments. For each segment, the amplitude is taken proportionally equal and a constant phase difference is taken as existing between adjacent segments. The resultant amplitude ...



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