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There is deceleration caused by friction and drag, which is complicated as far as computing is concerned (as someone noted above). It can be determined empirically with help of some controlled experiments and curve fitting. The simplest is off course to assume that it is constant deceleration. Depending on the application, it may suffice. If so, the ...


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There are photons traveling in all directions, not just the dozen or so you show. The further from the source the telescope is, the smaller the amount of solid angle it covers and the fewer photons it will gather. A $1 m^2$ telescope pointed at the sun will receive about $1.4 kW$. Taking a typical photon energy of $2 eV$ that is about $4.2E21$ ...


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The relationship between wavelength and distance is similar to the relationship between frequency and duration, and no: neither pair is the same. You can see by using dimensional analysis. Wavelength is distance divided by cycles. Frequency is cycles divided by time. Multiply the two, the cycles cancel out, and you get distance divided by time, or velocity. ...


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Another way perspective on it is that we have only single a points of observation (i.e our eye only has 1 observation point) for which observe objects. This means that when we observe an object, the visual angle will be smaller for objects which are further (if their sizes are the same). This is similar to mapping a point (our observation point), to any ...


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I am more familiar with graphing in Python than in the language you are using. The following snippet of code produces the graph you are asking for: import numpy as np import matplotlib.pyplot as plt # sci fi velocity graph D = 160934400000 # m v_i = 3070 # m/s total_time = 40*3600 # seconds: 40 hours # to cover half the distance in half the ...


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You could also understand why objects seem smaller from a certain distance and further and why they look bigger when they are to close as this: The retina has in humans a mean distance from the lens of in the eye about 0,02 metres. Thus, from simple trigonometry, we have:$$ {O \over P} = {I \over Q}$$ $$ I=({Q \over P}) O$$, where O is the real size of the ...


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Velocity is a more widely used term, usable for all moving objects and waves, while wavelength is of course only usable for waves. Wavelength is the minimal distance between two points of a wave with the same phase. Take for example a sinusoidal wave: the wavelength will be the difference between two maxima or two minima. The velocity of a wave is used ...


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A wavelength is a particular distance, corresponding to the length travelled during a period, which is a special time. Since $v=d/t$ holds good for the distance $d$ travelled by a constant velocity object over any given time interval $t$, a fortiori this relationship holds for the special, particular time known as the period. So, yes, $v=d/t$ is how you ...


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The lambda is the distance between 2 points having the same phase like two successive crests the velocity is the wave can be conceived as how many crests for example passes through a reference in a given time you can use both equations but c=f*lambda is used if you have lambda , its proof is V = distance / time , if a crest traveled a distance = wavelength ...


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Objects at a distance appear smaller because the visual angle they subtend becomes more acute with distance. The visual angle may be thought of as a triangle with apex at the eye, and the distant object as its base. The apparent height of an object is directly proportional to its actual height and inversely proportional to its distance from the eye. ...


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Apparent size is not measured as an ordinary size, in meters. It is actually an angle, so it is measured in degrees or radians. See this picture: The left blog is the eye. Look like as the object moves further, the angle becomes smaller. That is what is called perspective. Sometimes people try to compare apparent size and real size, but that makes no ...



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