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But light is essential to the theory of relativity. Yes you can measure distance in meters but time in space is not absolute. You could put a person on the start line and person on the finish lines with atomic clocks and they would not agree on when a person when the person started and finished. The person at the finish line would start the clock the ...


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Like Jimself, I know I've seen this somewhere (and will try to dig it up), but in the meantime I'll give you the answer off the top of my head. Can't guarantee this is entirely correct until I do dig some things up, but some parts are true (confident in the flat Universe part!). As long as you're interested in our Universe, your idea will actually work, ...


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You're correct. The speed is only the magnitude of the velocity. However, since the speed doesn't change it cannot change direction, as that would require acceleration. Of course, that assumes the speed is only in one dimension, because it could plot the speed of something with a circular motion, or any other motion for that matter. A spaceship in a circular ...


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The simple answer is that displacement, in this context, is distance. There are other uses, such as the weight of a ship, but that is not germane. Consider that the area under the line is x times y. In this case the x axis has the units of seconds, and the y axis has the units of meters per second. So when multiplying them out, $$sec\times\frac{meters}{sec} ...


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The graph shows a constant speed, which is positive, so we know that the velocity is not changing sign. Depending on the context of the graph (is it dealing with 1D motion or curvilinear motion) we could tell a lot. Technically, on a traditional velocity vs time graph, one is plotting a component of velocity, complete with signs. I don't think the plot is ...


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If you have $N$ point particles in a volume $V$, i.e. the particle density is $n=N/V$. Then any particle has a volume $\frac{V}{N}=\frac{1}{n}$ for itself. Imagine dividing $V$ in $N$ little cubes and all cubes hold one particle, than the distance between a particle and its nearest neighbour is $\left(\frac{V}{N}\right)^{1/3}=\frac{1}{n^{\frac{1}{3}}}$, ...


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Displacement is a vector quantity that starts from an object's initial starting point to the objects end point. Yes, it is the shortest distance between the initial and final point, despite if the object takes many detours and turns to get from the initial to the final point.


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I think other answers are insightful but I would like to elaborate them further. In a nutshell, the question in about an hypothetical brain which has physical dimensions comparable with one light years, and about its perception of time. Since information cannot travel faster than light, the time in which information travel from one side of the brain to the ...


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A being with 1 lightyear arms or even 1 lightyear across and density similar to flesh would be sufficiently dense to create an enormous black hole. Even planet sized, a being of that size runs into gravity problems, where, lifting it's arm would require significant energy to resist it's on gravitational attraction on it's limbs, so too big doesn't work. ...


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If there were an enormous being whose arm span is one light year across, how would that being perceive time? Wouldn't what we perceive as a year be virtually nothing to that being? It would probably have to have decenteralized brains spread throughout its volume here and there. Otherwise, yes, there is a distinct problem that a being with a single large ...


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It depends on the packaging: it's highly variable. But by far the most common one is defined by the Synchronous Digital Hierarchy standard or the almost identical American SONET standard. This is pretty much standard on all optical trunk networking. The data for this answer and your question will almost certainly have passed through an SDH link for the ...


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https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Optical_fiber states that a rule of thumb is that the speed of light in an optical fiber is 200,000 kilometers per second. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibre_Channel states the fibre channel networks run at 2,4,8 and 16 gigabits per second. ...


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At the quantum mechanical level experiments are scattering experiments. A nucleus is a composite of elementary particles. To "see" it, elementary particles are scattered off it and the scattering crossection is measured The cross section is an effective area that quantifies the intrinsic likelihood of a scattering event when an incident beam strikes a ...



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