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4

It should be clarified that the Higgs boson does not carry mass. The correct statement is that the Higgs field (not boson) is giving mass to some (not all) particles. In fact most of your mass is not given by the Higgs field. Most of the mass of atomic nucleus (protons and neutrons) is due to the binding energy of strong interaction. The Higgs field is ...


-1

So starlight propagates spherically and each human eyeball creates localized photons just at the intersection of wavefront and retina. No matter where you are in relation to the star some part of this wavefront will reveal the photon stream. Some kind of sensor that could image the path of all the photons/wave functions as they were emitted would reveal a ...


3

No, simply knowing the size and distance of a single object is not good enough. That will allow you to determine the angle between any two points in a photograph, but to know the size of a second object, you have to know the relative distances to the observer of the two objects. Obvious example: Just including the moon in a picture doesn't tell you the ...


0

Disclaimer: not an optics expert. When an image is out of focus, a point of light that would have gone to a single pixel in an in-focus pixel is instead smeared over multiple pixels. There is an algorithm for undoing this called deconvolution which has been used in practice. The process of doing deconvolution involves figuring out how big the 'smearing' is, ...


0

If you throw a ball at 60mph at 0 degrees, the horizontal velocity is 60mph. However, if you throw it at a 45 degree angle, the horizontal velocity becomes $\sqrt{60^2/2}$ mph, or about 42.4mph: Thus, on a frictionless surface with no wind resistance, throwing it horizontally will get it to the base the fastest no matter how far it is away. In the ...


2

A 45 degree angle gives you the maximum distance to the point where the ball first hits the ground. That's not where a baseball will stop. If you hit the ball at a lower angle, more of the total speed will be in the horizontal direction, and the ball will still continue with a fairly high horizontal speed after bouncing. Thus, the point where friction ...


4

Let's analyze with some simplifications. Ignoring friction for a moment... if you throw a ball at angle $\alpha$ with velocity $v$ such that it will fly for a distance $d$, and it is caught at the same height as it is released, then we can quickly calculate the velocity and time of flight. Time of flight: $$t = 2\frac{v_y}{g} = \frac{2v\sin\alpha}{g}$$ ...


10

Why does my sports coach tell me that when I'm fielding I should throw the baseball 'flat' to get the maximum distance? I thought from physics that you get the most distance from throwing at a 45 degree angle? The second question first, this is true if you are a robot throwing a ball on the Moon (no atmosphere) that releases the ball at the same speed ...


23

I am a baseball fan (and a physicst), and your coach is misleading you a little. First, in the absence of air resistance, a 45-degree launch will get the ball there with miminum energy expenditure. But not, as the other answers suggest, minimum time. And time matters. A lot. :-) Your coach should also be telling you to plan your longer throws such ...


30

45 degree angle for a projectile gives you the maximum distance in a vacuum, but air resistance, as pointed out, changes that a little. With air resistance slowing the ball, you need to to throw a tick under 45 degrees for maximum distance. Also Also, since you throw from above the shoulder, not from the ground, the ball is usually thrown a foot or ...


4

I am not a baseball expert, but the time, seconds, will maybe matter here. You are correct, the maximum distance, theoretically, is when you throw at a 45 degree angle. However, in baseball you might want the maximum distance compared to how long time it will take. You maybe want the ball to get as far as possible, as fast as possible? This might make your ...



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