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8

Carrying out the Fourier transform, I get a slightly different result for the frequency spectrum than 'knzouh'. I used $u$ instead of $y$ and $c$ instead of $v$, so the PDE becomes: $$u_{tt}=c^2u_{xx}-Au_{xxxx}$$ Fourier transforming the equation: $$F\{u_{tt}\}=F\{c^2u_{xx}\}-F\{Au_{xxxx}\}$$ Transforming $x$ to $k$: $$\hat{u}(k,t)=\int_{-\infty}^{+\infty}u(...


20

In plain English, there is stiffness at the ends of the strings where they are fixed in place, which makes the string's frequency of vibration slightly higher (sharper)—effectively shortening the length of the string slightly, for all practical purposes. And the resistance to bending is dependent on the frequency. It behaves more “stiffly” with regard to ...


157

This effect is known as inharmonicity, and it is important for precision piano tuning. Ideally, waves on a string satisfy the wave equation $$v^2 \frac{\partial^2 y}{\partial x^2} = \frac{\partial^2 y}{\partial t^2}.$$ The left-hand side is from the tension in the string acting as a restoring force. The solutions are of the form $\sin(kx - \omega t)$, ...


0

But, why do some waves, for example deep water waves, disperse? Dispersion can arise from several things. However, the basic fundamental idea is that the medium responds to the wave in some way (e.g., the wave excites a resonance in the media). Example: Plasmas and Electromagnetic Waves In the case of a plasma, electromagnetic waves can locally polarize ...


6

Dispersion in waves arises from both material property variation with frequency and from the geometry of the fields in question. That wave dispersion will arise from material property variation is obvious. But wave geometry and boundary conditions also matter. Simple example: a conductive waveguide with rectangular cross-section with sidelengths $a$ and $b$...



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