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The "math works it out" indeed. I try to write it as accessible as I can. A 0-domensional Euclidean space is just a point. The 1-dimensional is a line. The 2-dimensional is a plane. The 3-dimensional is the space as we know it. This can be continued to 4-5-6 whatever dimensions. On a plane you can draw lines and point, but not planes. In space you can ...


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I will not go into explaining what dimensions actually are, but as can be found out for example by reading the respective Wikipedia article, the number of dimensions of a space(-time) coincides with the minimal number of coordinates needed to specify a point. The directions you refer to do not coincide with dimensions as they are generally understood. To ...


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The users above have answered this question adequately, but there is an interesting class of materials where you actually may do the opposite! These are layered quasi-2D materials (see the image for example). In these materials, the individual layers act almost as if they are decoupled from the other layers above and below them because they are bonded very ...


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By your own definition, "one atom thick" is not two dimensional. In that case, you would have to squish something so hard that the atoms stop existing. In which case it is not two dimensional any more, either. As John pointed out, graphene is often considered a model for a 2D material - it is SO much thinner in the thickness dimension that we have to ...


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From a mathematical point of view you will never make something two dimensional by squeezing it because it will always have a thickness greater than zero. The limit would be something like graphene that is a single atom thick. This is pretty thin, but it still has a non-zero thickness so it's still 3D. However in the quantum world it is possible to produce ...



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