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4

You can simply take the semi-derivative of your equation again, which yields $$\begin{align} m\frac{d^2}{dt^2}\underbrace{\frac{d^{\tfrac12}x}{dt^{\tfrac12}}}_{=-\frac mk\frac{d^2x}{dt^2}} &= -k\frac{dx}{dt} \\\Rightarrow m^2\frac{d^4x}{dt^4} &= k^2\frac{dx}{dt} \tag{*} \end{align}$$ and then solve that ODE. But, similarly to squaring an ...


2

So, what you have here is, as others have mentioned, a fractional order differential equation. Since others have provided graphs, there seems to be little point to adding one. Also, you seem more interested in the qualitative aspect than actual analytical solutions, as you've mentioned. In essence, what you have here is some second order system with some ...


2

I do not know if it is "plausible" (I do not think so), however a trivial model can be constructed for the one-dimensional case with continuous forces depending on velocities, for $c>0$ constant: $$F_{12}(v_1,v_2) = c\sqrt{|v_1-v_2|} \quad\mbox{and}\quad F_{21}(v_1,v_2) = -c\sqrt{|v_1-v_2|}$$ The system of these two particles does not admit a unique ...


2

An attempt for a more explicit solution. Using the definition of the half-derivative given by JamalS, one can transform the differential equation using the Laplace transform and get $$s^2X(s)-sx(0)-x'(0)=-\gamma^3{\sqrt s}\;X(s)$$ where $\gamma=\sqrt[3]{\frac km}$ is a positive constant. Solving for $X$ gives $$X(s)=\frac{sx(0)+\dot x(0)}{s^2+\gamma^3{\sqrt ...


1

Whether or not a PDE allows separation of variables depends not only on the equation, but also the boundary conditions. The following conditions must be satisfied for the method of separation of variables to work: The differential operator should be separable. An example of the one which is not separable is \begin{equation} \frac{\partial^2u}{\partial x^2} ...


3

One way to try to solve the equation is transforming it in an ODE. Apply the fractional derivative $D^{1/2}$ again to the equation to find $$D^{1/2}[D^2x(t)]=D^{5/2}x(t)-C_1t^{-3/2}-C_2t^{-5/2}-C_3t^{-7/2},$$ and $$D^{1/2}[D^{1/2}x(t)]=Dx(t)-C_4t^{-3/2}$$ Hence we got $$D^{5/2}x(t)=-\frac{k}{m}Dx(t)+C_1t^{-3/2}+C_2t^{-5/2}+C_3t^{-7/2}$$ But, we also have ...


14

I am no mathematician and am a little afraid that my answer is too simple to be true, but here goes: I use Fourier transforms to define the fractional derivative. $x(\omega)$ is defined such that $$ x(t) = \int_{-\infty}^\infty \, \frac{\text{d}\omega}{2\pi} \text{e}^{i \omega t} \, x(\omega) \, .$$ Then any integer derivatives is $$ ...


20

If $D^n$ denotes the $n$th derivative and $D^{-n}$ the $n$th integral, then we have that, $$D^n f(t) = D^m[D^{-(m-n)}f(t)]$$ providing $m \geq \lceil{n}\rceil$. For our half derivative, we choose $n=1/2$, and $m=2$, in which case we have, $$D^{1/2}f(t) = D^2[D^{-(3/2)}f(t)]$$ There is a general formula for the $n$th integral of a function, one of my ...



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