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1

I will answer the question by myself. In ultraviolet range, dielectric constants tend to approach 1. The real part is very close to one, and the imaginary part is very close to 0. reference: David Attwood, Soft X-Rays and Extreme Ultraviolet Radiation: Principles and Applications.


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The issue here is how much the refractive index $n$ tells you about dissipation. As you rightly said, the imaginary part of $n$, which depends on both real and imaginary parts of $\epsilon$, leads to an imaginary part in k which describes an exponentially decaying electric field. However, this doesn't necessarily correspond to dissipation (i.e. a drop in ...


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So, this is an old post that I came across when I had a similar question. Here's a paper where they dissolve different amounts of ions in the water and found that the ability for the microwave oven to heat the water actually reduces as more ions are introduced.


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This is pretty straight forward. All you need to do is measure the capacitance of the sample at constant frequency and at different temperatures. Imagine the sample as a parallel plate capacitor of thickness D and area A. Now Dielectric constant E = C D/A. With these calues you can plot the values w.r.t different temperatures and arrive at your curie ...


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I'd guess that you've seen the Wikipedia article on dielectric heating. If so, I think the article is potentially confusing when it says: Temperature is the average kinetic energy (energy of motion) of the atoms or molecules in a material This is true, but in solids the energy is in lattice vibrations. It is kinetic energy in the sense that the ...



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