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It's not altogether clear what you're asking, but I'm guessing you're doubting the "standard" set: $$\nabla\cdot\vec{D} = \rho$$ $$\nabla\cdot\vec{B} = 0$$ $$\nabla \times \vec{E} = -\partial_t\vec{B}$$ $$\nabla \times \vec{H} = \vec{J} + \partial_t\vec{D}$$ These are the set you use in linear, isotropic inhomogeneous mediums. So, for example, from the ...


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This appears to be a matter of wording. The force each point charge exerts on the other is indeed reduced in a sense. However, this formula does not take into account the force between each charge and the slab, which is caused by the surface charges on the slab just as you describe. This additional force can be found with the method of images. Your question ...


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EDIT#2: I'm now made aware that you need wavelengths that are much larger than those presented here(a bit of an oops from reading this question quickly). This approach is still valid, but what you need cannot be obtained from these data. I'm going to leave this here however to collect downvotes and if anyone needs $\epsilon_r$ as it depends on $10^{7}$ to ...



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