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The boundary conditions, as noted in the comment below the original post, are: \begin{align*} E_{1z} &= E_{2z} & \epsilon_r E_{1y} &= E_{2y} \\ B_{1y} &= B_{2z} & B_{1z} &\approx B_{2z} \end{align*} (I'm using 1 to denote the dielectric and 2 to denote the air. The "approximate equals" sign above is because we're assuming $\mu_1 ...


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Short answer: yes, the surface charges are taken into account; in fact, they're what ensures that $\vec{E} = 0$ inside the conductor. The electric field at any point in space can be viewed as the superposition of the fields from the point charge outside the sphere, and the induced surface charges: $$ \vec{E} = \vec{E}_\text{point} + \vec{E}_\text{induced} ...


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You can derive the boundary conditions from maxwell's equations in time independent form, along with snell's law and the continuity of photons. You replace $\nabla$ with $\Delta$, the difference of forces. $\Delta\times E=0$ has the effect that the horizontal component of E is 0, because there is no field vertical to E or H, and $\Delta\cdot B = 0$ means ...


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You would simply add the potential that would exist at $O$ in the absence of the charge sphere and the potential which exists due to the sphere. This is due to superposition, since you can add the electric fields linearly and you must follow the same path in the path integral $V = -\oint \vec{E} \cdot \vec{dr}$ then the potentials actually add linearly as ...


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In order to achieve this effect in magnetism the same way as electricity,you have to have magnetic monopole because if you have two magnetic monopoles that have the ame sign,then they can cancel each other out like two positive electric monopoles(charges)for example.For the time being,we have only measured magnetic dipoles(the magnetism that we all know),but ...


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There are no insulators against magnetic fields. Unlike electric field lines which can be broken so that negative charges are blocked from reaching the positive terminal, magnetic field lines MUST ALWAYS terminate in the opposite pole. There are no magnetic monopoles. Nature will always find a way to return magnetic field lines to the opposite pole. ...


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There are materials, that are diamagnetic. Those show the property of suppressing external magnetic fields by producing an antiparallel one inside of them. This happens in every material due to Lenz's law: An appearing external magnetic field will cause a current to flow. The current has to go in such a way, that the resulting magnetic field will not amplify ...


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Your misconception seems to be that a conductor connected to the ground must have zero charge. The actually effect of grounding a conductor is to put it at zero potential, not charge. The ground is assumed to have an effectively unlimited supply of charges/capacity to accept charges in order to make this condition true. After step 2 and before step 3, the ...



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