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The difference between statistical physics and quantum mechanics is that, in statistical physics, it is always reasonable to either measure a quantity, or demonstrate that the effect of that quantity can be bundled into an easy to work with random variable, often through the use of the Central Limit Theorem. In such situations, it can be shown that the ...


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Forget interpretations. The predictions of quantum mechanics - which agree with all interpretations (by definition of 'interpretation')- does not allow prediction of experimental/observational outcomes no matter how much information is gathered about initial conditions. (You can't even get the classical information needed in classical physics because of the ...


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I will address the title, ignoring the content of the question . If I repeated a quantum measurement, would it be the same? This is the method of gathering data in particle physics in order to check with as good an accuracy as possible the quantum mechanical predictions for the interactions. For example one sets up a beam of identical particles ...


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As you said, the result of the measurment depends on probability. Each eigenvalue (i.e. result of a measurment) has a certain probability of coming out when a some characteristic of the system is measured. Think of this in an easier example. Suppose that you have a pair of dice. Both are exactly the same, so, for both dice, the probability of each number to ...


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Dice is a purely classical object, if one starts from a known boundary condition, the Newton's law differential equations should return you the same result every time. However, electrons are quantum object, in the sense that they are very fragile. Once you measure the position, i.e. shining light on the electrons, you impart momentum so that the result would ...


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If we think little more complex and consider every particle in the universe, each particle should be moving with some initial velocity caused by something happened before, due to some other particle You do not state the level of your physics knowledge. I will assume you are a highschool student. What you are describing is the way classical mechanics ...


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There is no randomness in quantum mechanics, there is only uncertainty. , as stated, whoever may have said it. Mathematical definition of randomness: The fields of mathematics, probability, and statistics use formal definitions of randomness. In statistics, a random variable is an assignment of a numerical value to each possible outcome of an event ...


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I had a little research on it. First of all, Quantum Mechanics is all based on probabilities. What is a probability. It gives you the chance for a specific event to occur from a list of possible events. Now what is the probability of a probability. Suppose if you say that there is 80% probability of finding a particle, there is a most possible chance for ...


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The core of your question is subtle, so I'll be careful in how I set up my answer. In my understanding of quantum mechanics, wave function collapse is the closest a physical process can be to the mathematical idealization of a random variable. However, before the collapse, a complicated many-body process, the wave function evolution of the system is ...


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Randomness is a behavior that is unpredictable and there can be no mathematical pattern to it. However, uncertainty does have a mathematical pattern, thus proving randomness as false. For instance, you can scribble all over a piece of paper and you can eventually find some mathematical pattern even though what you've done seemed like it was pure ...


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Bell's inequality enumerates possible correlated combinations of outcomes. Then it assumes that every correlated outcome is statistically equally likely. Which is not the case in reality. That is why, the "inequality" arises. Anti correlation (which happens within an entangled pair), can be easily achieved with the help of local hidden plan. It is the ...


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In classical physics there is so called deterministic chaos, a level of unpredictability caused by an uncertainty of initial conditions. For this case there is a number called the Lyapunov exponent that measures the rate of exponential divergence of two solutions with small differences in initial conditions. This number is the measure of unpredictability in ...



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