Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Your question is really tricky. I am going to try to discuss two of the issues in the first two paragraphs. The rest of the paragraphs will speak only purely formally about how "old" classical cosmological equations would work in the case you describe and what a physically intuitive interpretation of the singularity could be. First, without quantum ...


1

The question is very speculative :-) Physics is based on models out of our experience of a world extended in space and time together with mass and energy. One example: The concept of point is already a Euclidean idealisation. It lives in the world of mathematics - not of Physics (otherwise, you fall into Democritus and QM) Indeed, in Maths, we still struggle ...


0

So my question is, is it like future of an isolated system is already determined but is just not perfectly predictable by an observer because of limitations in observability? In quantum mechanics the outcome of measurements is in general not determined when given the exact physical state of the system in general. But apart from the uncertainty arising ...


-4

The universe cannot be predicted from a single data point about a moment in time because inertia does not exist in any one moment but is critical to how a system would develop.


15

A deterministic universe need not be predictable. And even a deterministic universe not hampered by any limits to observability need not be predictable. As an example take a toy universe consisting of an infinite chain of $0$'s and $1$'s. This 1D cellular universe evolves according to cellular automata rule-110: the state of a cell becomes $1$, unless the ...


15

There are a few ways to answer your question, and I will try to list some of them. According to Quantum Mechanics, and due to the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, we cannot predict the future state (position and momentum) of any system. Given the state of a system in classical phase space $(\textbf{r}(t_0), \textbf{p}(t_0))$, we cannot determine the state ...


3

Even in a quantum universe, all evolution is deterministic if interpreted under Many-Worlds interpretation. So all possible futures could be "already determined", but you would still be unable to know which of those futures will be directly experienced by your qualia, since qualia experiences are always described by non-unitary probabilistic projection ...


1

You might be interested in this question or this question (and some others I cannot track down now). The basic problem is this: It is not clear what we exactly mean by "deterministic". If you mean that we can in principle determine the future state of a system solely from initial conditions, then the time evolution given by the Schrödinger equation is ...


0

To say the least, they are inseparable. The "indeterminacy" is meant to be a synonym of the "uncertainty" (original in German: Unschärfe oder Unbestimmtheit), e.g. the nonzero values of $\Delta x$ (uncertainty of position) and $\Delta p$ (uncertainty of momentum) that obey $$ \Delta x \cdot \Delta p \geq \frac\hbar 2$$ This is a consequence of the nonzero ...


0

The most important thing to learn in Chaos Theory is perhaps the idea that deterministic equations lead to unpredictable dynamics. It is not always a matter of having been able to make the measurements practically accurate. Infinitesimal difference in Initial Conditions make the difference between the paths in the phase space diverge exponentially (jargon: ...



Top 50 recent answers are included