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I am trying to answer your questions one by one. By the way, I saw your comment. 1. You say in the question: "Why doesn't anything need the second derivative (acceleration)?" Yes the acceleration is needed for obtaining the velocity. I some situation we are given the force and the mass, as in an electrical or gravitational field, not the velocities. Then ...


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The reason that you only need to specify initial position and velocity to exactly solve the equations of motion for a system is simply because Newton's Second Law (which is the equation governing motion in Classical Mechanics) is a second-order differential equation. The upshot is that to solve a 2nd-order ODE, you basically need to take 2 integrals. Each ...


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Radioactivity is a result of unstable atoms. That is, an atom that either has too many protons, neutrons or electrons to stay stable. Using Quantum Mechanics and looking at the overlap of wavefunctions in time, it should be possible to predict the rate of radioactive decay. But I believe you and I would be long dead before today's computers would finish a ...


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No, it's not possible. The reason is that string theory is a quantum theory. That means it includes all of the properties of quantum theory among its basic assumptions. That includes the Born rule, which relates wavefunctions to stochastic probabilities ("randomness") when measurements are made. Because string theory includes quantum randomness as an ...


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Yes. Bohmian mechanics is superdeterministic. You see, the pilot wave and the "particle" covers everything in the universe, including the experimentalist and the measuring apparatus. The location of the "particle" fixes the experimentalist's will and the detector settings superdeterministically. Neither the experimentalist nor the detector has any free will ...


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My two cents to add to the great response from wetsavanna: a short explanation would be the following. Technically, information never increases or decreases at the microscopic level. Entropy is a measure of information about how much do we know about the microscopic levels when making a macroscopic observation. But the relationship between entropy and ...


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Your question is an excellent one and I think your IT approach is spot on. The contradiction you rightly point out arises partly from the subtle differences between the different Conditional Entropies (Conditional Informations) at play in this discussion. Leaving aside Universes for the moment, let's instead think about a truly thermodynamically isolated ...



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