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There's a type of alloy called interstitial alloy, which might increase the density of the metal, while perhaps not expanding its volume, by introducing small atoms that can fit


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Copper is quite a dense metal at 8.96. Both the stable copper oxides are lower density. I do not believe any surface treatment could increase the bulk density of pure copper, unless there are cavities in the material. The only way apparent density might increase is if the volume is assumed constant and the treatment causes the surface to adsorb external ...


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The density of water (and other fluids) depends both on the pressure and the temperature. A graph for water is here: You may see that at 1 bar (1 atmosphere), the density is highest around 4 °C. That's the conditions where the density reaches the nice 1,000 kilograms per cubic meter. Water contracts when it gets warmer than that, but also when it gets ...


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Please study Ned Wright's Cosmology FAQ: How do Astronomer's Measure the Density of the Universe? There it is pointed out that the local density varies from region to region; the scale of the region surveyed determines the granularity. The answer is clear and obvious: the density of the universe is NOT uniform at all distance and time scales.


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When you add salt to water, sodium chloride dissociates into sodium and chlorine ions. These charged particles alter the intermolecular forces between water molecules increasing the boiling point. The temperature needs to be increased about one half degree Celsius for every 58 grams of dissolved salt per kilogram of water.


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(b) is correct. Your equation applies only if all the fluid is the same fluid. Suppose that, as in your problem, E = gz, where z is the elevation above the base. So, the component of your equation in the z direction becomes $$\frac{dp}{dz}=-\rho g$$ Because points 3 and 4 involve the same fluid, the pressure at these two points is the same, say ...


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You know that sound is a longitudinal wave. It passes through a medium by pressurizing and depressurizing the medium. Solids are highly elastic than air. They are very hard to deform. So, they resist any change in the positions of the atom. Once disturbed, the medium develops a high restoring force to tend back to it's original position, but inertia causes ...


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Adiabatic bulk modulus of air $=1.4\times 10^5$ Pa and Young's modulus of steel $=1.8 \times 10^{11}$ Pa. Density of air $= 1.2 $ kg m$^{-3}$ and of steel $8050$ kg m$^{-3}$. The interaction between the atoms within steel is via the bonds whereas the interaction in air are by molecules colliding with one another and limited by the speed at which the ...


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Cause glass is an amorphous substance and with time they can flow like liquids. Because of this they're also called pseudo solids or super cooled liquid.



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