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27

No. The answer is clearly no. This building is 800 meter high. Some comparison: Skydivers are falling more kilometers in free fall. They experience absolutely no damage from the pressure increase. Scuba divers moving fast upwardly or downwardly also don't get any wounds, although 10 meter deep water has the same pressure as there is between the sea level ...


16

The reason is electron degeneracy pressure. The cores of giant planets are dense enough that the electrons in the gas occupy about $h^3$ of phase space each. The Pauli exclusion principle means that they cannot all occupy low energy/momentum states. This means that even at relatively cool temperatures the gas can still exert considerable pressure due to the ...


11

Although we don't have a quantum theory of gravity, we think we have some reliable knowledge about the properties of black holes from general relativity. One thing we think we know is the so-called "No-hair conjecture", which says that black holes can be described by just three numbers: mass, charge, and angular momentum (i.e. how much they are spinning). ...


9

The image below represents the Sun's density gradient, which shows how the density changes with the radius. The ground we stand on should have a density between 2 to 3 $g/cm^{3}$. That should put you just above the water point on the vertical axis. The corresponding radius is then about 0.45 of the solar radius. Note that the vertical axis is in a ...


8

Ok, trying my luck with a physics answer. Let's first look at the boundary conditions given in the movie, since we're particularly talking about that here. The water planet is said to have $130\%$ of earth's gravitational acceleration on the surface. So we have \begin{equation} g_W = 1.3 g_E \end{equation} This is a given and not to be violated. And in fact ...


7

Density is a 3-form, since you would write it as $$\omega:=\rho\text dx\wedge\text dy\wedge\text dz.$$ In special relativity it remains (the time component of) a 3-form. More specifically you have a current density $J$ of the form $$J = \rho\text dx\wedge\text dy\wedge\text dz + J_x \text dt\wedge\text dy\wedge\text dz+ J_y \text dx\wedge\text dt\wedge\text ...


6

It depends on how the quantity in question transforms. Almost always, densities in the form of "stuff per unit volume" and generally the "stuff" (like a charge) is a scalar (a number of things - number of elementary charges), but the volume it is contained in is observer dependent, owing to the Lorentz contraction. Therefore the density is ...


5

If we take neutron star material at say a density of $\sim 10^{17}$ kg/m$^{3}$ the neutrons have an internal kinetic energy density of $3 \times 10^{32}$ J/m$^{3}$. So even in a teaspoonful (say 5ml), there is $1.5\times10^{27}$ J of kinetic energy (more than the Sun emits in a second, or a billion or so atom bombs) and this will be released instantaneously. ...


5

Sometimes I feel Wikipedia is a funny place... In the article you quote they provide a calculation from our patent application (see, e.g., http://akhmeteli.org/wp-content/uploads/2011/08/vacuum_balloons_cip.pdf ) proving that a homogeneous shell made of any existing material cannot be both light enough to float in air and strong enough to withstand ...


4

It's true. Special equipment and a long time is required to mix helium and nitrogen. According to one study, a mixture of 2.7% He, 93.3% N at 800 p.s.i.g. required a special cradle to repeatedly upend the cylinder, and 20.5 hours to reach equilibrated gas, which then remained mixed: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/je60005a002. The helium repeatedly ...


4

It is commonly believed that the speed of sound at high densities is bounded from above by $c/\sqrt{3}$, where $c$ is the speed of light. Calculations of this quantity in many theories, ranging from QCD to systems with scale invariance, have all shown it to either stay below or exactly saturate the bound. See the introduction of this paper for a recent ...


4

Basically, it has to do with the density of the material as a function of temperature. The density of iron increases as it cools, that is, solid iron is more 'packed tight' than when it is melted. This is understandable, since the kinetic energy of the iron atoms decreases as the temperature drops (ie: the average velocity of the atoms decreases), allowing ...


4

This is an instrument that measures fog density and has an experimental plot, figure 9 . Once you have the relative humidity at the fog appearance at a temperature and pressure , one can use known equations to get the density. This link gives a calculator.


4

You would be wise to somehow determine the exact fluid used by the original manufacturer. Consider that each of the floats has a fixed density, and has a temperature marked on its hanging tag. So you need a liquid which will have the correct, different density at each temperature marked on a tag. In short, the liquid you choose must match both the ...


3

As an experimental answer, for 12" latex balloons, I could lift about 5 grams (in addition to the balloon). It of course will depend on how full you fill the balloons.


3

Assuming you are talking about exoplanets, I'll offer this. To obtain a density you need a mass and radius. Masses come via two methods - either measuring the radial velocity variations of the star it orbits (the bigger the RV variations, the bigger the planet mass), or so-called transit timing variations. This latter works in multiple "transiting planet" ...


3

One should always specify whether one is talking about rest mass per unit rest frame volume, $\rho_0 = m_0/V_0$, rest mass per unit observer-frame volume, $D = m_0/(V_0/\gamma) = \gamma\rho_0$, or relativistic mass per unit observer-frame volume, $(\gamma m_0)/(V_0/\gamma) = \gamma^2\rho_0$.1 (I can't imagine the fourth case, relativistic mass per unit rest ...


3

Far away from a black hole, spacetime is curved only a little bit, and many different things could curve it like that out there. It's like if you had a dollar in your pocket, and it's been there for a long time, and you can't remember if you got it from your boss or from your friend. But a dollar is a dollar. So you could have a massive star, or a black ...


3

There is no relationship between the density of a metal and its electrical resistivity. There is a big database of material properties called MatWeb which is recommend as a legitimate source of data by UCSD's and Stanford's library systems, Rose-Hulman, etc. I took data from around 60 different metals and graphed them: As you can see there is no ...


3

This is because the whole boat, along with the air in the boat, is lighter than the water it displaces. For example, if a small boat will take up 1 cubic meter of water, then it has to be heavier than the weight of 1 cubic meter of water. This is explained in this post by What If here. For the same reason that bowling balls float (because salt water the ...


3

Your intuition is right: the density of the string goes down a little bit when you increase the tension. HOWEVER: the wave in a string is a transverse wave which depends on the tension and the mass per unit length. If you double the tension the mass per unit length goes down by a small amount (the string gets a bit "thinner" because it gets longer) . Both ...


3

The black hole event horizon is not a thing i.e. not a physical object. It is just a surface in spacetime from which light can never escape to infinity. Also, if we take the Schwarzschild description of a (non-rotating) black hole then it is a point mass hidden away behind the event horizon. You can't spaghettify a point mass. When two black holes merge, ...


3

I've just remembered that there was once a suggestion to use a mixture of xenon and oxygen under high pressure to allow people to float/fly/swim in it. It was also stated that water could be lighter than such a mixture. According to Smithsonian Physical Tables the critical point for xenon is $16.6\,\text{C}^{\circ},\quad ...


2

As long as the outlet tube has greater vertical depth than the inlet tube, the weight of falling gas in the outlet tube should maintain an area of decreased pressure at the top of the siphon which should keep the gas in the inlet tube from sliding back into the source pool, and a flow should be maintained. I don't see why this wouldn't work. The Wikipedia ...


2

It does seem odd that a star that isn't a black hole can explode, and therefore presumbly lose mass, and still form a black hole. The explanation is that to form a black hole requires a high density not just a high mass. Even a small object such as, well, you or I could form a black hole if compressed enough, though obviously in practice that level of ...


2

As @KyleKanos point out, "the answer is a google search away", but it's not quite as simple as he suggests. The mean density doesn't answer your question (the mean density turns out to be about 1.4 times the density of water by the way). An ill-defined idea in your question is the "surface" of the sun. Where is the "surface" of the sun given that none ...


2

Since you have not specified the "real world" size of the ship, let's take a 74-gun ship of the line https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seventy-four_(ship) as the desired type, firing a 36-pound cannon. The bore on such a cannon https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/36-pounder_long_gun was about 175 mm, with a shot weight of about 39 lb. Shrinking this cannon to a bore ...


2

I will focus on just a little bit of one of your questions - the relationship between compressibility, density and pressure - and per my comment, recommend that you narrow down the scope of your question. As you know, in a gas we experience "pressure" because molecules hit the walls of the containing vessel. When I double the number of molecules in the same ...


2

The article you refer to is talking about the speed of sound (or speed of longitudinal wave vibrations) within a material and how that relates to volumetric mass density. If you were transmitting sound from one end of a guitar string to another, this would be relevant. But the sound produced from a string is not related to the speed that it travels within ...



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