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Assuming you are talking about exoplanets, I'll offer this. To obtain a density you need a mass and radius. Masses come via two methods - either measuring the radial velocity variations of the star it orbits (the bigger the RV variations, the bigger the planet mass), or so-called transit timing variations. This latter works in multiple "transiting planet" ...


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So I am guessing you have a a 2 dimensional density? say, kg/m^2? In this case, you will need to get the area of your box -> say it is 2m^2. The mass of the box is 2 * 0.5 = 1 kg. But the mass of your person is 80kg. So your new mass is 81kg. This means the new density will be 81/2 = 40.5kg/m^2. The item will only float if the item has a lower density ...


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One should always specify whether one is talking about rest mass per unit rest frame volume, $\rho_0 = m_0/V_0$, rest mass per unit observer-frame volume, $D = m_0/(V_0/\gamma) = \gamma\rho_0$, or relativistic mass per unit observer-frame volume, $(\gamma m_0)/(V_0/\gamma) = \gamma^2\rho_0$.1 (I can't imagine the fourth case, relativistic mass per unit rest ...


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If you want to float a human in gas, the density of the gas must be greater than human density, which is about the same as water. For the human to be comfortable, this should be done somewhere near STP. Given the ideal gas law can be written in terms of density as $\rho = PM/RT$, the only way to make a denser gas is to increase the molar mass, M. Since ...


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If we take neutron star material at say a density of $\sim 10^{17}$ kg/m$^{3}$ the neutrons have an internal kinetic energy density of $3 \times 10^{32}$ J/m$^{3}$. So even in a teaspoonful (say 5ml), there is $1.5\times10^{27}$ J of kinetic energy (more than the Sun emits in a second, or a billion or so atom bombs) and this will be released instantaneously. ...



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