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The image below represents the Sun's density gradient, which shows how the density changes with the radius. The ground we stand on should have a density between 2 to 3 $g/cm^{3}$. That should put you just above the water point on the vertical axis. The corresponding radius is then about 0.45 of the solar radius. Note that the vertical axis is in a ...


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As long as the outlet tube has greater vertical depth than the inlet tube, the weight of falling gas in the outlet tube should maintain an area of decreased pressure at the top of the siphon which should keep the gas in the inlet tube from sliding back into the source pool, and a flow should be maintained. I don't see why this wouldn't work. The Wikipedia ...


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It does seem odd that a star that isn't a black hole can explode, and therefore presumbly lose mass, and still form a black hole. The explanation is that to form a black hole requires a high density not just a high mass. Even a small object such as, well, you or I could form a black hole if compressed enough, though obviously in practice that level of ...


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As @KyleKanos point out, "the answer is a google search away", but it's not quite as simple as he suggests. The mean density doesn't answer your question (the mean density turns out to be about 1.4 times the density of water by the way). An ill-defined idea in your question is the "surface" of the sun. Where is the "surface" of the sun given that none ...


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Since a car is made up of many different materials, which all likely have their own different densities, the density of the car is, therefore, not the same everywhere. The average density is the density such that, were the entire car to be that density, it would have the same volume and mass. It is very easy to figure out. The total mass of the car divided ...



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