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If you are measuring y at some value x, and both quantities have uncertainty, then in principle you should show the uncertainties on both axes. In some circumstances you might omit the x error bars. This would be the case if the y value depends on x such that $$\Delta y \gg |dy/dx| \Delta x,$$ where $dy/dx$ is your best estimate of the gradient of $y(x)$. ...


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If we know-and we are sure about-the relationship between y and x: If $y=f(x)$, you must propagate the uncertainty of $x$ to $y$. That is, since $y$ is analogous to $x$, then the uncertainty in $y$ is analogous to the uncertainty of $x$. So, you use a method that you can find in detail in Taylor's book "An Introduction to Error Analysis: The Study of ...


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If I have a raw xrd data then how should I convert my peaks arbitray unit intensity to percentage? In olden days visual intensity scale was used by us in the interpretation of single crystal diffraction data. As the relative intensities were a requirement the laboratory standards were set on the 'reference' diffraction photographs available say of ...



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