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In the current paradigm of cold dark matter, then yes, dark matter is everywhere in space, and can pass through and inside your body. It must be so weakly interacting with normal matter that there is nothing to stop it. However, the answer to whether there is any dark matter inside you now turns out to depend strongly on what that dark matter is. Dark ...


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Dark energy is a response of the GRT followers to that they can't explain the shape of galaxies. The Heaviside style GEM does indeed give the correct shape without adding a fix to nature to make the equations work.


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Consider the average beta decay, which at nucleon level looks like $$ n \longrightarrow p + e^- + \bar{\nu} \,. \tag{1}$$ The distribution of electron energies (as measured in proton's frame) is controlled by the phase space of the products. We observe an electron energy spectrum consistent with these physics. What you propose is essentially that this ...


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This argument might conceivably work for weak decays, though I believe there is evidence to the contrary. This comes to mind, but I won't 100% swear it's quite what you're after. Peterh mentions in a comment that weak decay rates (e.g. in supernova afterglows) appear to be independent of the local density of dark matter. There is no reason to believe the ...


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There will be as many formulae as models, because it depends what one supposes dark matter is composed of. If WIMP In particle physics and astrophysics, Weakly Interacting Massive Particles, or WIMPs, are among the last hypothetical particle physics candidates for dark matter. The term “WIMP” is given to a dark matter particle that was produced by ...


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My view on the constant speed of stars orbiting around the centre of the galaxy is this: the density of stars is such that a ball (same centre as the ghalaxy) with radius $r$ has to contain mass directly proportional to $r$. As long as the mass outside the ball is distributed evenly enough, that outside objects' mass's gravitational effects cancels ...


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These are models that extend/modify the theory of general relativity: In theoretical physics, massive gravity is a theory of gravity that modifies general relativity by endowing the graviton with a nonzero mass. In the classical theory, this means that gravitational waves obey a massive wave equation and hence travel at speeds below the speed of light. ...


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You are asking if one of these theories is "more correct" than the other. That is a somewhat philosophical question. You can surely believe that a theory "makes more sense" than another, but this has more to do with your personal preference. Correctness in modern science is a matter of agreement with experimental observation. And at the moment there is no ...


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Dark matter is uncharged, it might be its own antiparticle. No relationship to matter and antimatter, where mainly its charge conjugation and parity. we don't know that dark matter has any antiparticle broken symmetry. And there is no known relationship between matter and dark matter, except they interact gravitationally and maybe through weak interactions....


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No way, amount of dark matter is estimated to be 4 times the amount of normal matter. Even if we ignore all other arguments, it still does not restore the symmetry. Dark matter (if there is such a thing), is actually transparent matter (we can not see it) and cold matter (it does not absorb/emit any heat/radiation). That also means that you can not measure ...


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No, we know enough of the "bulk properties" of antimatter to rule this out. Antimatter interacts with the electromagnetic field in exactly the same way as regular matter, just with the opposite charge. Therefore, antimatter should be detectable using most of the techniques we use to detect regular matter in astronomy. This works even if the antimatter is a ...


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I think we can pretty safely say this is not the case. The main reason is that we have a pretty good idea of where dark matter is--to some degree, it can be reconstructed from the gravitational influence it has on surrounding matter. The dark matter appears to be distributed evenly throughout the galaxy. Thing is, a galaxy is pretty "dirty," as far as space ...


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Like it was said before, there is no a priori reason why nature should treat everything symmetrically. Much to the contrary, we know several examples of P- and CP-violating processes. And in other cases we do not even know the reason why a process is "symmetric", when in principle it would be allowed to violate CP (see: the strong CP problem). I guess you ...


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There's not reason to assume nature should treat everything symmetrically. There are many phenomena in nature that we actually know are asymmetric. For example the weak force violates parity symmetry (meaning the weak force has a preference for right or left handedness).


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Dark matter might be matter which has no protons or neutrons, more like pure energy than the kind of matter which is familiar to us ... kind of like the "GEONs" which John Archibald Wheeler proposed, speculatively, many years ago (see his book Geons, Black Holes & Quantum Foam for details). Because it contains energy, and because energy is ...



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