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According to Constraints on Dark Matter in the Solar System the following upper limits have been placed on dark matter in the solar system, based upon orbital motion of bodies in the solar system: At the radius of Earth's orbit: $1.4 \times 10^{-19} g/cm^3$ At the radius of Mars's orbit: $1.4 \times 10^{-20} g/cm^3$ At the radius of Saturn's orbit: $1.1 ...


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From the paper itself: Gravitational lensing of the CMB’s light by large scale structure at relatively late times produces small deflections of the primordial pattern, converting a small portion of E-mode power into B-modes. The lensing B-mode spectrum is similar to a smoothed version of the E-mode spectrum but a factor ~100 lower in power, ...


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Dark matter is generally not associated with a total lack of visible matter. From formation simulations we predict that luminous matter is really only clumped together because dark matter was there already (gross simplification, but sorta descriptive). In addition, although the distribution of luminous matter and dark matter don't exactly match (ie bullet ...


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Planck: 13.82 Gyr; 68.3% dark energy, 26.8% dark matter, 4.9% baryonic matter. http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.5534 There is no dark matter in the solar system. Dark matter inside Saturn's orbit is less than 1.7×10^(-10) M_solar. Dark matter is repeatedly reparatmeterized curve-fitting with no empirical composition. Dark matter phenomenology is wholly ...


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The answer is because dark-matter has relatively constant density, as has been given explicitly in another answer. Then, it logically follows that the impact on the Milky Way due to this low density. To show this step, I will establish a figure of merit. $$ FOM = \frac{M_{dark}}{M_{normal}} $$ That is, the ratio of dark matter within the area of ...


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Dark matter collects in larger quantities (thus a higher proportion relative to matter) in the centre of galaxies compared to in the centre of stellar systems such as the solar system. galaxies are not very dense, as stellar systems are sparsly spaced. So even though on a galactic scale the dark matter is in high ratios, on a stellar scale the ratio is ...


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Dark matter would affect planetary motion, but the influence of dark matter on planets in our solar system is too small to detect even currenlty, due to the low concentration of dark matter compare to ordinary matter in our solar system. See Constraints on Dark Matter in the Solar System. The density of dark matter is very low, $ <~10^{-19} grams/cm^3$, ...


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As i see it a gravitons would interfere if gravity waves interfere. And I certainly think that a gravity wave would interfere. I guess that they are transverse waves that can interfere like any other waves.


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WMAP: 13.75 Gyr; 72% dark energy, 23% dark matter, 4.6% baryonic matter Planck: 13.82 Gyr; 68.3% dark energy, 26.8% dark matter, 4.9% baryonic matter http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.5534 Dark matter inside Saturn's orbit is observed to be less than ${1.7×10^{-10} M_{solar}}$. One doubts "dark matter" materially exists versus Milgrom acceleration universally ...


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According to the original paper from the Atacama Telescope team the collision axis is somewhere between 15° and 30° to the line of sight. So the claim that the axis is tangential to the line of site is misleading (since the line of sight is a straight line, wouldn't the tangent to it be the same straight line?). The velocity component normal to the line of ...


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I think that dark matter disproves the big bang. The energy excerpted by dark matter on all things would have prevented the universe from coming into existence through the big bag.


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You first ask whether there could be interference effects between virtual gravitons. Assuming something like the standard theory for particle interactions (quantum field theory) would apply to a quantum theory of gravitons, there would indeed be interference between virtual gravitons. The total probability of a scattering event involving gravitons, say ...


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Question 1. Can virtual particles, in particular gravitons, interfere? Gravitons are the hypothetical carriers of gravity, corresponding to the photon for electromagnetism, with a very weak coupling to matter in comparison to all other forces: With the strong force coupling at 1, the electromagnetic is at 1/137 , the weak 10^-6, the gravitational ...



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