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Firstly, your idea does make on important prediction, which is that the universe originated at a point in space (the location of a black hole) and we should be sucked towards that point, eventually being sucked in and the cycle happening all over again. There is plenty of observational evidence that your theory can not be correct. Firstly, the universe did ...


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Chris White's answer covers the content of the question . I will reply to the title At what point do researchers in physics make the leap from wild theoretical ideas to physical experiments? It is very very seldom that wild theoretical ideas lead to physical experiments. And when they do, as with special relativity, which the Michelson Morley ...


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First, it's important to realize that all proposed changes to physics need to be tested, whether they amount to adding new stuff to the universe or modifying equations that have worked fine thus far. Suppose someone comes along and says, "I can explain this supposed dark matter by modifying gravity," and lots of theorists agree. Great. Now observers will go ...


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I can't find an entry level article on the subject, but the baryon density affects the relative proportions of the light nuclei formed. Have a look at this graph from this article: This shows the calculated abundances of the light nuclei formed in Big Bang Nucleosynthesis as a function of the current baryon density. The thin horizontal lines show the ...


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Here are two recent review articles on the topic, on the subject of dark matter itself and the broader subject of the cosmological parameters. The short story is that we have good evidence that the Universe is flat. The main evidence for flatness is anthropic: we are still here to observe the universe some ~14 Gyr after the Big Bang. A "closed" universe, ...


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according to the astrophysical observations which shows for example: much more bending expected in lights directions due to the gravity of the stars and galaxies we know. it means we know there are four example 2 galaxies which can bend the light which come from a third and farther galaxy. and the bending to the light due to these 2 galaxies should be X. but ...


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http://t.space.com/all/25691-dark-matter-black-hole-atoms Some people much smarter than me think that "quantum" sized black holes are a candidate for dark matter. There are problems with it, but as far as I know there are problems with every candidate so far. I'm just reporting what I have read. My understanding of "dark matter" (meaning 1) is that it is ...


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To date there is nothing published (and serious) that makes a confirmed detection of dark matter particles. Thus, the only evidence in favor of its existence remains from indirect methods: calculate the mass that should be there based on visible sources (stars, galactic powder, etc), and use this mass to calculate the speed of stars about the galaxy as the ...


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I can't really say what the significance of the result is that you show without some more details on what exactly is being shown in the picture and where it is from. Here though is a counter-example from the well-cited study of Fich, Blitz & Stark (1989) for our own Galaxy, which appears to show excellent agreement where the two techniques overlap ...


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If you assume that there are 200 billion stars - that is objects with mass between say $0.075 M_{\odot}$ and $100 M_{\odot}$ you can use this to normalise a mass function - the number of stars per unit mass - and then integrate stellar mass, weighted by this mass function, to estimate the total mass in stars. If you do that then what you find is (1) high ...


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In another closely related question (According to the initial mass function, should there be more brown dwarfs than red dwarfs? ), I showed that the number of brown dwarfs (with $M<0.075M_{\odot}$) is a factor of five smaller than the number of red dwarf stars (stars with $0.075<M/M_{odot}<0.5$), using the widely adopted Chabrier (2005) lognormal ...



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