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4

A "left over waste product" is matter, too, and it must be composed of something, of some particles allowed by the laws of physics. So labeling something as "waste" doesn't really answer any question about the identity of dark matter. Moreover, most of antimatter has annihilated with the ordinary matter into photons. In fact, any product of the annihilation ...


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Let us clearly draw the line between two things here, since the question can easily involve opinion based answers, which may also be dubbed non-mainstream (which isn't welcome on this site). 1) The existence of dark matter is generally believed by a majority of the Physics community, since astronomical observations, notably by the Planck space ...


6

Yes, there have been suggestions that such particles exist, and an example is the sterile neutrino. But your question is a little more involved than you might think at first sight. For example if the sterile neutrino only interacts through gravity what interaction caused it to be created in the first place? There is nothing in the Standard Model that could ...


2

This answer is within the current physics and theoretical understanding, which has developed a successful formalism that includes all the experimentally seen particles in the Standard Model. The model has been very successful in predicting several new particles using its symmetry and mathematics, the experimental observation of the Higgs boson serving as ...


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Most of it would've become radiation- mostly photons and some neutrinos. Some of that can be seen in the cosmic microwave background. The rest would've gone into the kinetic energy of remaining matter particles (i.e., heat). We don't actually know what dark matter is made of, but we do know what the reaction products of matter/anti-matter annihilation are ...


1

The word energy tends to be used in a rather vague way, and typically to mean something exotic. In the context of particle reactions energy either means photons or the kinetic energy of the particles leaving the reaction. For example an electron and anti-electron annihilate to produce two photons. By contrast the annihilation of a proton and anti-proton is ...


3

Milgrom's simple Newtonian MOND cannot, as it is just a modification of newtonian dynamics (which is the acronym for MOND, after all). Jacob Bekenstein, however, has worked out a relativistic generalization of MOND called TeVeS that does account for gravitational lensing and a variety of other effects: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TeVeS TeVeS is ...


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Some Googling later I have an answer for you. The relevant papers are: M. A.Markov, “Elementary particles of maximally large masses (Quarks and Maximons),” Soviet Physics (Journal of Experimental and Theoretical Physics), vol. 24, p. 584, 1967. V. I. Man’ko and M. A. Markov, “Properties of fridmons and the early stage of evolution of the universe,” ...


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I think the idea is that the interior universe is not infinite -- it is just the finite size of the visible universe. This is not dissimiar to the "Hubble bubble" idea in cosmology: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hubble_Bubble_(astronomy)



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