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In electric circuits there is concept called duality, which says that for any phenomenom that occurs related to voltage, there is a dual phenomenom related to current. Thus, voltage and current are equally important to understanding electric circuits. As for your light bulb problem, your light bulb requires 16 W of power to operate. Your supply is only ...


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I can verify using Kirchoff's laws that this is solvable. Ultimately, $$R_{equiv} = \frac{I_aa+I_bb}{I_a+I_e}$$ where the subscripts denote which resistor the current flows through. Setting up $I_e = I_d+I_c$, $I_b = I_a+I_c$, $I_ee + I_cc - aI_a = 0$, $I_dd - bI_b = cI_c$, which is 5 unknowns, but only 4 equations. This isn't a problem, as you can soon ...


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Reducing eddy current does not change property of conductor or circuit Eddy currents (also called Foucault currents) are circular electric currents induced within conductors by a changing magnetic field in the conductor, due to Faraday's law of induction. Eddy currents flow in closed loops within conductors, in planes perpendicular to the magnetic field. so ...


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Point particles as the electrons (which are the charge carriers) move according to Newton's law $\textbf{F}=q\textbf{E}=m\textbf{a}$. Whenever an electric field is present it generates a difference of potential between two points $A$ and $B$ given by its differential form calculated between the two points $$ V_A - V_B = \int_A^B \textbf{E}\cdot d\textbf{s}. ...


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The alternative to moving in a curved path is moving in a straight path. Which your electron will only do only if all the forces are parallel to its velocity vector. So an electron starting from rest in a uniform electric field will travel in a straight line - but that is an exception, not the rule. But you could think of that as a "curved path with infinite ...


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The electrons are not moving in a curved path. They are moving according to the solutions of the Newton's equation $$ m\textbf{a}=\textbf{F}(\textbf{r},\textbf{r}')=q\,\textbf{E}(\textbf{r},\textbf{r}') $$ As the above being a Cauchy problem, the form of its general solution explicitly depends on the initial conditions for position and velocity and in ...


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Current density (CD) is dependent on voltage (AC or DC), geometry of the conductor, and the material properties. I use printed circuit tracks where the geometry plays the most important role in calculating the CD. For straightforward geometries, I guess hand calculations could be used - but for me, such hand calculations have been incorrect by up to a factor ...



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