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Why not try (as Nathan hints) assuming a charge density of $\lambda$ $(= q/l)$ per unit length. By symmetry you know that the electric field must be directed along the axis of the cylinder, because in the radial direction, the fields due to a charge on one side of the cylinder have an equal and opposite component generated by a charge on the opposite side of ...


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If the two plates are made of conducting material, there is nothing preventing charges from flowing as close as possible to each other, which, in this case, means toward the edge of each plate closest to the other, right next to the insulating layer. If we now suppose the layer to be thin (dimension $d$) with respect to the plates' sides $L = 10\; cm$), ...


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Yes. See Principles of Electrodynamics by Melvin Schwartz. He derives all electrodynamics including Maxwell's equations from Coulomb's Law and Special Relativity.


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It depends how the charges are distributed in the material, and on the material's conductance. If you have a metal, the charges of the plates would be mobile and result in a hard to compute distribution. I cannot help you with that. There are probably good approximations to tackle those kind of problems but I am no expert. If the charges are static and ...


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On a microscopic level the effect you describe does occur. For example, the force between two molecular ions or polar molecules will be affected by the presence of water molecules in the space between them. As ACurious points out, there will be little or no effect if the liquid is on the outside of the rod.


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Permittivity is a macroscopic property of matter - it is a consequence of the way material is polarized in the presence of an electric field. The properties of an atomic bond are determined by the atoms participating in the bond, the molecular structure in which they find themselves, and (to a lesser extent) the presence of a magnetic and / or electric ...


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If the ions are separated they have no shared band. Bringing them close together results in a bonding state, i.e. a shared electronic state that has a potential energy below that of the ions at infinity. The other questions follow from understanding this.



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