New answers tagged

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By E=−Z^2RE/n2 where RE is the Rydberg energy As n increase, EPE becomes less -ve(i.e. more +ve) , indicating higher energy level< Or EPE = 1/4πε( Qproton Qe-) /r, As r increase, EPE becomes less -ve(i.e. more +ve) , indicating higher energy level< Thanks to everyone that helped !< I beg to differ on the above explanation provided by ...


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By E=−Z^2RE/n2 where RE is the Rydberg energy As n increase, EPE becomes less -ve(i.e. more +ve) , indicating higher energy level Or EPE = 1/4πε( Qproton Qe-) /r, As r increase, EPE becomes less -ve(i.e. more +ve) , indicating higher energy level Thanks to everyone that helped !


5

The potential energy stored in a two like charge system will increase with decrease in distance between them. While for a two unlike charge system, the potential energy decreases with decrease in distance (means potential energy gets liberated if they come close), accounting for increase in attraction. In the equation, you provided, the potential energy ...


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The energy in a level $n$ is given by $$E = - \frac{Z^2 R_E}{n^2} $$ where $R_E$ is the Rydberg energy ($R_E = 13.6\mathrm{eV}$). Therefore, greater $n$ means lower energy (in absolute value), i.e., the electron is less bounded.


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Negative sign just indicates the attractive potential. The factor of $1/2$ is to average the double counting of the same term. It is the average of two terms for every value of $i$ and $j$.


-1

If apply in moving charge then no. Of forces act on them so we can't calculate position of charges but in case of static it is possible so it applicable only for point charge or static


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The notation $k^2$ for vector $\boldsymbol{k}$ means the square length/magnitude of the vector; if $\boldsymbol{k} = (k_x,k_y,k_z)$ in Cartesian coordinates then $$ k^2 = \left|\boldsymbol{k}\right|^2 = k_x^2+k_y^2+k_z^2 $$ so that $$ \widetilde{g}(\boldsymbol{k}) = \frac{4\pi}{k_x^2+k_y^2+k_z^2} $$ (using Pythagoras)


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In vacuum, any two point charges bearing electric charge of the same sign will solely interact, if they are pinned at a particular distance, via the Coulomb force that is in $\sim \frac{q_1q_2}{r^2}$ as you say so that they will always repel no matter the distance. Now, if you take in vacuum any two charged pieces of the same material (even at the ...


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In this situation, I just want to quote what Richard P Feynman once said in an interview. "If you hold two like poles of a magnet together, they repel apart, which means there is some force existing in between them avoiding them to have a contact. That's an experimental truth. But if you ask me why there is a force in between them that do not want them to ...


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But I don't understand the mechanism of the force creation But the concept of electric charge and electric field is, by definition, the mechanism of the force creation - that humans have invented to model that which has been observed. Never forget that the observed is the metaphysically given. It is up to us, as beings possessing a rational faculty, ...


2

You have misrepresented the citation in the book. The 5th edition page 757 discusses experiments with a hollow sphere and a solid sphere. The experiments verify that the exponent is 2 within experimental error.


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This mostly comes under the theories of matter and therefore essentially chemistry i.e the types of bonds. The typical bonds are metallic bonds, ionic bonds, covalent bonds, hydrogen bonds, as well as Van de Wall forces and the like. I advise looking into these. Electromagnetism is responsible for the amalgamation of elements into compounds of any phase, ...


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To my mind, the above explanation (and others commonly presented) is missing an important piece though. In the semi-classical intuition presented, there should never be a preference for spins to align. The reason is that Pauli exclusion slapped on top of a classical picture simply restricts the phase-space of the system, thus reducing entropy. Sure, the ...


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Much of chapter I, section 9 in "Foundations of potential theory, Oliver Dimon Kellogg, Berlin: Verlag von Julius Springer, 1929", parts of which appear in the answers by Mathaholic, Procyon and Qmechanic, is devoted to answer this question. Let $v$ be a small region of arbitrary shape, containing $P$ (defined by $\vec{r}$) in its interior. We consider the ...



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