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Briefly, no. Charged particle interaction is fundamentally a non-instantaneous photon exchange. The interaction can be written or expanded as the ''naive'' instantaneous interaction ($e^2/r$) plus a photon exchange portion which contains exactly a $-e^2/r$ term and a non-instantaneous (retarded in time) term. The author calls the first term the Coulomb ...


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To have the right picture in mind, you need to also take into account the Pauli exclusion between the electrons, being fermions, but also more importantly, do not exclude the nucleus from the picture here! Now, Why rule one holds you may ask? Well it clearly cannot be due to dipole dipole interaction between electrons as it's so insanely small (let's say ...


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There's no need to invoke spacetime curvature here in order to obtain some first order nontrivial results, at least in weak gravitational field, such as Earth's. Because of the equivalence principle, homogeneous gravitational field is indistinguishable from the accelerated frame. Therefore, freely falling observer in, e.g. Earth's gravitational field, will ...


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Yes. Strictly speaking you can't apply Coulomb's law, or in general any law about the falloff of something with distance, in curved space. Instead you have to shift to a field-based formalism. You can calculate the way the electromagnetic field propagates through a curved background—basically you take Maxwell's equations in tensor form and replace ...


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Of course Coulomb's law has to be adapted! And it is therefore fortunate that there exist manifestly covariant formulations of electromagnetism that do not care how spacetime is curved. However, we should first briefly observe that Coulomb's law is not one of the fundamental laws of electromagnetism, though it has played a great role in its inception: ...


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The Lorentz force experienced by a charge $q_1$ is: $$\mathbf F = q_1(\mathbf E + \mathbf v \times \mathbf B)$$ where x means vector-product. The electric field $\mathbf E$ between charges does not come from magnetic properties of the charges. With the magnetic field the things change. A moving charge $q_2$ produces a current, and a current produces ...



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