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1

Firstly, you must know that there are many models for inflation which give different results to your a) and b) questions, and we still don't know which is the right one. I'll try to answer regarding the most accepted and simple models. a) During the period of inflation the distance between two separated points in the Universe increased at least ...


1

Good question. Not clear to me it reaches infinity, or high enough for a singularity. It seems that if one is talking about non accelerating, i.e. Inertial, observers in a de Sitter spacetime, it is a constant temperature determined by the cosmological constant. The cosmological constant is constant in de Sitter, and per current observations. Please note ...


0

Then we have alternatives, such as the Big Freeze transitioning into the new Big Bang in the Conformal Cyclic Cosmology Anyway, the short answer is nobody knows. There is too little known about the nature of Dark Energy especially to be able to say what the universe will be like in the far future.


-1

Heat Death and the Big Freeze are the same thing.


5

The most straightforward theories of inflation assume there exists some scalar field $\phi$ that permeates the Universe and drives inflation. Over time this scalar field changes, and the rate of change is given by $\dot{\phi}$. There is also some "potential energy" associated with the scalar field, which is given by some function $V(\phi)$. The specific ...


-5

In a static bounded universe, what happens to particles that hit the edge? I venture to say nobody knows for sure. But it's an interesting question, because we have no evidence whatsoever that our universe is infinite or some kind of hypersphere. See this answer to a related subject. The story goes that in the old days, people could not conceive of a ...


-1

When we talk about universe inflation we should have in mind that the four cosmic forces did not appear yet, because at inflation no elements were formed yet. scientists say that at 0.03 second the inflation reached four light-years, also said that if it had continued at the same rate, it would have been disappeared during the second have of the first ...


4

Conformal space is nice because in it, photons have straight world-lines, so we can easily see what we must do to achieve causal contact between two points in the CMB, after the physical time $t_i=0$ of the initial singularity, but before the physical time $t_{\text{CMB}}$ of decoupling. Since we have \begin{equation} d\tau=\frac{dt}{a(t)}, \end{equation} ...



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