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The cosmological constant has an interesting history behind it. Originally, when Einstein introduced his theory of general relativity in the early 20th century, the Einstein Field Equation, which was the equation for the gravitational field, described gravity as the effect of the curvature of space-time due to the presence of matter and energy. Perhaps you ...


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The cosmological constant is important for at least two reasons. Our universe is currently asymptotically evolving towards a universe where a constant energy density dominates the total energy density. The cosmological constant can be interpreted as exactly this. Therefore, analysis of the current state of our universe relies heavily on the concept of a ...


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We don't know how the relationship between gravity and dark energy changes over time as gravity decreases (from the rest of the universe), because one cancels out the other to a degree we don't know. It is not reasonable to assume that as the universe expands more strings of dark energy magically appear to keep the density constant. Einstein originally ...


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I think you are missing that the source is actually referring to he observable universe explicitly - just somewhat indirect: It is not obvious as it is talking about "visible/observable universe", but about "total mass of the visible matter" and "mass density of visible matter". As far as I can see, any references to mass etc in the universe are covered by ...


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My view is that dark energy is like hot air in a balloon. It's density does not stay constant, but decreases as the universe expands, like every other form of energy. Like other forms of energy, it would also be subject to the second law of thermodynamics and would cool down, slow down, and get sucked into black holes, converting it's pushing effect, into a ...



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