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Where is the spring balance here? It's not present. It's a statement that anywhere you find a force, you can put a spring balance along with it to measure the magnitude (at least conceptually). In this case, we might imagine that there is a solid radius present (like a rod), and a spring balance attached to the radius, free to move radially, but ...


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For the first part of your question, you have to realize that your net velocity (the one that you plug into the expression for centripetal force) is the vector sum of the surface velocity and your velocity relative to the surface. If you were running West as fast as the earth turns East, you would "stay in place" and the sun would appear to stop moving in ...


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OK, so I figured out why I was so confused: The keywords that helped me have the "aha" moment were on wikipedias page for Coriolis Force. the Coriolis force is an inertial force (also called a fictitious force) In my head I was imagining Coriolis Effect being caused by fluid friction, but it's actually caused by inertia with not enough fluid friction ...


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The quick answer here is no. At least not more that you can fly with the help of the centrifugal force. Remember that both of these forces are fictitious forces, so there exists a coordinate system where the forces are zero. Do not get me wrong, i like the way you are thinking. Unfortunately the scenario you are describing is essentially a situation where ...


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I never did like the merry-go-round explanation for the Coriolis Effect. It may be intuitive for some, but I never could wrap my head around it. (And it's properly the Coriolis Effect, not Force. It's no more a "force" than the "force" pushing you against your car seat as your car accelerates.)This works better for me: Imagine you plan on launching a ...


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In the northern hemisphere winds moving from north to south do deflect to the right i.e. towards the west. Two an example of this would be: - In the northern hemisphere winds in hurricanes circle in a clockwise sense so on the eastern side of the storm winds a moving towards the south and deflected west - to the right. In the Hadley cell in the ...


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In physics, the Coriolis effect is a deflection of moving objects when they are viewed in a rotating reference frame. In a reference frame with clockwise rotation, the deflection is to the left of the motion of the object; in one with counter-clockwise rotation, the deflection is to the right. In the Northern hemisphere the Coriolis force ALWAYS ...



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