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No, because you forgot to take into account the W-->E motion the helicopter had upon takeoff. What matters (ignoring winds and such) is the relative linear speed and the altitude. Calculate the circumference at the ground, compare with the circumference at altitude, and you'll see that since both the Earth and the helo have the same linear W-->E speed that ...


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The coriolis effect only applies to objects in relative motion -- specifically, motion that changes the distance from the rotational axis (of the earth in this case). A hovering helicopter cannot feel this force. You seem to be confusing the coriolis effect with wind: the coriolis effect is the consequence of us pretending the earth is not rotating: under ...


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Airplanes always maneuver with respect to the surrounding air. Something which confuses beginner pilots is the following question: imagine you have a wind from north to south, and you point your airplane to the west. Where is the air pressure higher? a. The left side of the plane b. The right side of the plane The answer is: neither. The pressure is the ...


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Just to make things simple, suppose you are standing at the north pole, and you shoot a bullet south at some speed, aiming for a target 1 km away. In the time it takes the bullet to get there, the target has moved east a certain distance, because the target travels in a complete circle around the north pole in 24 hours. From the viewpoint of the shooter, who ...


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Why do airplanes experience negligible Coriolis force while bullets experience the Coriolis force in long range shooting? You are confusing the force with the consequence of the force. Consider a powered parafoil whose total mass is a mere 100 kg (motor+parafoil+pilot) and is moving at a mere 25 km/h and a 50 caliber bullet whose mass is 50 grams and is ...



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