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7

this is a broad, complex, somewhat tricky question with many angles that an entire survey or book could be written on but unfortunately it seems one hasnt yet. heres a "grab bag" of some deep parallels noticed over the years that such a book might cover & "research leads" for further inquiry. Modelling and simulation. as computing capability has ...


7

There exists substantial evidence that integers that appear in physics are emergent in character, see e.g. this essay by Prof David Tong http://fqxi.org/data/essay-contest-files/Tong_integers.pdf which won a silver prize in a related contest http://fqxi.org/community/essay/winners/2011.1 Because the integers are emergent, they're not fundamental ...


5

The computer program can be very simple and they have existed in one form or another for many years. At least for the purpose of defining variable star pulsation timings. The problem lies in both in signal to noise ratios and total timings. The variation in light can be lower than milli-magnitudes for planetary passes and as such this is very tricky to ...


5

There are numerous examples of people using genetic algorithms, for example, to optimize some output where an actual solution of the equation would be otherwise impossible. Information entropy, which is a generic computing concept, has some hold on statistical physics. But I cannot think of a case I have seen where a concept from cutting edge computer ...


4

Hard disks use magnetic storage, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magnetic_storage i.e. the information is stored in the South/North orientation of small pieces of the magnetic medium (also the case for tapes in the old tape recorders; and credit cards; these applications differ by the "geometry" how the bits are arranged but not by the essence how a bit ...


3

The link between Computer Science and Physics can be very subtle sometimes. For example, consider this article: http://arxiv.org/abs/1010.0128 The point is the following. Consider a quantum algorithm in order to solve an NP-complete problem (i.e.: a hard problem, which is conjectured not to be solvable in polynomial time). Now, consider a classical ...


3

According to Seth Lloyd's Ultimate physical limits to computation, the time taken for an operation is limited by the uncertainty in the energy available $\Delta t=\pi\hbar/2E$


3

Optical Drives are used for the storage of data (Using Photochromism) in several disk formats with the help of laser diodes. Popular optical drive formats include CD-ROM, CD-R, CD-RW, DVD, DVD-RAM, DVD-R, DVD+R, DVD-RW, DVD+RW, DVD-R DL, DVD+R DL, BD-R & BD-RE. As we all know, computer understands binary data (either 0 or 1). Here, 0 (false value) says ...


2

Simply put, it's because a fan imparts momentum on the air (i.e. accelerates it), so in front of the fan you get a roughly conical jet of high speed air. At the back side of the fan there is a low-pressure region which makes the surrounding air move towards the fan (following the pressure gradient) from a large solid angle, as you already stated. This is ...


2

Re question 1: A processor is obviously a very complex object, but it's made of from basic structures called logic gates. A logic gate consumes power mainly when it's changing state, and the frequency with which it changes state will probably be, on average, proportional to the clock frequency. To work out the work done whenever the gate changes state you ...


2

That is a very good question. I think the answer is that it is a quest for the unexpected. Programs have been developed to detect the transits, but perhaps there are new kinds of discoveries waiting to be made by having thousands of people looking at the data. From Humans vs. Machines on the Planet Hunder's site: ... developing computer algorithms to ...


2

It's because present-day computers are syntactic devices, not semantic devices. Humans use both levels (and possibly others) to figure out our way in this world, whereas computers only have access to the first level. More simply put, computers lack the big-picture perspective, and the hugely interconnected network of representations that our brains are so ...


2

A flip-flop (bistable multivibrator) is, in simple terms, two transistors wired together in such a way that there are two stable conditions: (1) one transistor is full "on", while the other if full "off" (2) vice versa If the circuit happens to be in a state "in-between" these two states, it will, due to positive feedback, very rapidly move towards one of ...


1

You don't add matter when you store information. Unless you do so by plugging in a drive. Additionally, since there are about the same amount of 1's and 0's running around in a computer when it's drive is empty as when it is full, and since the states of the electrons in the physical drive (ie how info is stored) makes a lack of information weigh the same as ...


1

Voltage runs through transistors which are formed in the substrate of the IC. In order to perform logic this voltage needs to be controlled. When they get too close together then electrons can tunnel across the gap between them and you can no longer maintain control of the flow of electricity through the IC. What I expect he's saying is that within about 5 ...


1

As mentioned in the comments, this is an extremely complex problem if you intend to consider every possible aspect. However, for a general estimation, you can use the relatively simple methods described in this document to begin calculating the effects of air drag on projectiles. Note that in the document cited, they make the assumption that the air is not ...


1

On a physical level, they basically work on the same principle of encoding information in pits arranged in a spiral track on one or more reflective layers in the disc, and using them to modulate laser light reflected off these layers. The main differences are: The size of the pits and the pitch (spacing between adjacent iterations) of the spiral, with ...



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