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1

Let´s go: [1] From the DIS (Deep Inelastic Scattering) of eletron-proton, we can imagine that the photon exchanged in te process "sees" a parton (possible constituent of the proton) distribuition. We can imagine a cross-section of photons and that constituents of the proton. And we can analyze two situations: From a cross-section of longitudinal (scalar) ...


2

1) Note that the non-relativistic gluon model of glueballs has even less justification than the non-relativistic quark model of baryons and mesons. This is because the model messes up the spin assignments: Massless gluons have only two spin states, but non-relativistic gluons have three. 2) The color quantum numbers are trivial: The product $$ [8]\times ...


4

Experimentally the charge distribution of protons and neutrons has been measured as a function of the radius. So the different charge content of the two nucleons does affect the distributions. As the other answer states this is the regime where only quantum chromodynamics models can attempt to describe the wavefunctions of the quarks within the ...


0

This is not a meaningful question. No, really, it isn't. Quarks don't exist as free charged objects on which we could take the classical limit and consider "forces" on them. They are confined, and occur only as constituents of bound states. In quantum mechanics, it doesn't make sense to ask whether the constituents of a bound state "repel" or "attract" each ...



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