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The only factor is the capacity to return to the original shape when it is deformed by an external force. An elastic object recovers its shape after it has been compressed and deformed, if you crush a plastic bottle and remove the cap it will partially return to his original length, a lead ball is almost completely irreversibly deformed. The Coefficient ...


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*elastic collision occur between atomic particles? inelastic collision occur between ordinary objects? perfectly inelastic collision occur during shooting? super elastic collision occur during explosion?* as John Rehnnie has explained, an elementary particle as the term implies, is not made of other particles, has no lattices ...


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The force from the ball on the wall is exactly equal and opposite to the force of the wall on the ball. Both forces however are perpendicular to the wall (and must be assuming the wall is frictionless) and not necessarily perpendicular to the ball's initial direction of motion. Being perpendicular to the wall the force on the ball has absolutely no effect on ...


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Assuming a direct hit - so traveling through about 50 km of atmosphere - at 0.1 c that would take about 2 ms if it didn't get slowed down too much by the atmosphere. What about drag force? Let's assume a radius $r$, density $\rho$, mass $m = \frac43 \pi r^3 \rho$. If it is a sphere, it experiences a drag force $F=\frac12 \rho_a v^2 C_d A$. Putting $\rho_a=1 ...


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Consider the following results: From the definition of scalar product of four vectors, $$ \tag{1}(p_1 p_2)^2 \equiv (p_{1\mu}p_2^\mu )^2 = (E_1E_2 - \textbf{p}_1 \cdot \textbf{p}_2 )^2.$$ The usual dispersion relations: $$ \tag{2} E_i = \sqrt{ | \textbf{p}_i |^2 + m_i^2}.$$ The velocity $\textbf{v}_i$ in terms of momentum and energy: $$ \tag{3} ...


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You can be sure that at least one reasearch team may help answer your question. Try to mail them. It seems that one can make such model. But still, as we can see it's a bit probabilistic field. http://trb.metapress.com/content/v4t5712601175275/ ...


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This follows on from my answer to your previous question: Factors on which Coefficient of restitution depend. The coefficient of restitution of a collision depends on the available degrees of freedom for energy to be lost. If you take your example of the collision of atomic particles, let's say two electrons, then there isn't anywhere for the initial ...



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