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Q: When we write that, do we suppose a collisionless or collisional nature of the fluids? A: It's the energy-momentum tensor for a perfect fluid Chapter 2.26 Q: If this description corresponds to collisional fluids, why cosmological simulations are N-body simulations (collisionless) and are not simply based on hydrodynamics? A: Cosmological simulations are ...


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The second solution will mathematically satisfy the conservation equations, but corresponds the objects not actually colliding. Or they ``ghost'' and fly right through each other. :)


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If you have a planet of mass $M$, then its self-gravitational binding energy is roughly $-GM^2/2R$ give or take a small numerical factor. So, for the Earth, this would be $-2\times 10^{32}$ J. Something colliding with the Earth, which has a similar mass and size, would do so at velocities of tens of km/s at least. I think the minimum closing velocity would ...


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I have found mistake in my calculatuion. First j = −(1 + e) vab1 · n j/= 1⁄ma + 1⁄mb + (rap × n)2 ⁄ Ia + (rbp × n)2 ⁄ Ib is how we calculate the impulse. taken from here http://myphysicslab.com/collision.html. the expression (rap × n) is a cross product of vectros, i calcualted it as dot product. and the expression jn is NOT a scalar value. it is ...


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Given the mass m of the ball, the incident normal speed v, and the coefficient of restitution $\rho$, Then the integral of F over the duration of the collision $\Delta t$ is $$\int_0^{\Delta t} F dt = \frac{m(1 + \rho)v }{\Delta t}$$ assuning no rotational effects are incurred. This follows from the fact that at any instant the acceleration of the ball away ...


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Anything over 500 miles in diameter, give or take is almost always sphere-shaped, the primary variation being rotation speed, which can give a flatness to the object, for example, Jupiter is visibly flattened by it's high rotational speed. The problem with building a strange shape by very large collision is that the heat generated in a collision of that ...


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Depends on the nature of the collision. If there is a mechanism that takes energy from the system, i.e. a deformation, than energy is lost. You could think of your example as the center of mass of your rod as a point mass that starts rotating on a massless string once is passes the pivot. As usual, energy and momentum are conserved. You could do the ...


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I will yet add another formalism: Lets start with the hamiltonian form of Hamilton's Principle. Let $c: \mathbb R \longrightarrow T^*Q; t\mapsto (q(t),p(t))$ be the trajectory of a particle in the phase space of the configuration space $Q$, we define a subset of $Q$, $C$, where no contac occur between the particles, and $\partial C$ is te set of ponts wer ...



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