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There is an excellent paper of 15 pages that contains all the electromagnetism distributional approach fundamentals from Skinner and Weil. Its title is "An introduction to generalized functions and their application to static electromagnetism point dipoles, including hyperfine interactions". Let me know if this is useful for you.


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The glass bob will reach the ground earlier as acceleration due to gravity is independent of a falling body's mass. Being an insulator, no induced current is developed in it due to Earth's magnetic field.


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I assume the first part, up to But how exactly does it happen? defines and explains your question, and then you show what you think about it so far? It looks like the point where it goes wrong is about what the inductor does. There is nothing about "split-second" and relativistic, it behaves in a pretty symmetric way to the capacitor. It's "dynamic" ...


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Fleming's right-hand rule applies when a conductor is moving in a magnetic field and the current is induced. However, in this case, we have a charged particle moving through a non-varying magnetic field, so it's Lorentz magnetic force law that applies best here. The simple form, in which there is only a magnetic field component (and no externally applied ...


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You Should consider lorentz force into account with the absence of electric field the lorentz force on electron is given by F = -e(v x B) Visit http://sun.iwu.edu/~gspaldin/B_deflection_Lab.pdf


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We don't really understand why charge is quantized. Nor we do know if there ought to be magnetic monopoles. These two things seem linked. Dirac gave an argument for charge quantization in the early days, but this presupposed the existence of a magnetic monopole. In Maxwell's equations, it would be completely natural to imagine the existence of magnetic ...


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Ion lenses (either of the electrostatic or magnetic variety) typically all have something in common: the fields are such that particles which are off-axis are more strongly bent towards the axis, and particles that are on-axis remain unaffected. Using electrostatics, this is most easily achieved using an Einzel lens. This is a lens that consists of two or ...


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If there is "no initial inertia", then the acceleration is infinite! I'll assume you mean initially at rest. The simplest answer is that the charged particle will oscillate (sinusoidally) in the same direction as the applied electric field. The acceleration and E-field are in phase, but the velocity and E-field are out of phase. In most cases only the ...


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The only exceptions I know arise from quantum effects. For example a charged fundamental particle with non-zero spin also creates a magnetic field. So an isolated static electron has a non-zero magnetic moment. Even though this is a purely quantum effect it can produce macroscopic fields. For example the magnetic field of a ferromagnet is due to the magnetic ...


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Magnetic fields can be generated by particles in motion (in the classical sense). Generally, this not a requirement. For example, magnetism can arise from quantum effects, such as orbital angular momentum (you could say that this is a particle in motion in the classical sense, but quantum probabilities come into play here) and may also arise due to the ...


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Depending on how "basic" you consider an equation to be to electromagnetism, you could consider other equations to be important enough to be thought of as basic, given the type of situation. For instance, when dealing with electromagnetism in media (typically linear media), the Constitutive Relations also apply and are necessary: $$\overrightarrow{D} = ...


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Let's explain the principle of rotation here from the scratch. Say you have the circuit with 1T magnetic field perpendicular to it but the battery is intially switched off. Obviously the wheel will not rotate now as there is no moving charge and hence no Lorentz Force . Now when you switch on the battery, electrons will flow through the spokes from outer ...


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The Maxwell equations only approximately describe electromagnetism, even in a pure vacuum. This is a consequence of quantum electrodynamics. One can derive corrections to the Maxwell equations; this was first done by Heisenberg an Euler in the regime where the fields only change appreciably over distances much larger than the electron Compton wavelength, see ...


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In intuitive terms, electromagnetism is the theory of the electric and magnetic fields $\vec E$ and $\vec B$. Given charge and current distribution in space, the solutions to the Maxwell equations are unique as discussed here. So, if they suffice to calculate $\vec E$ and $\vec B$ for any given electromagnetic configuration, the theory is complete. What ...


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In electromagnetism we say that all the electromagnetic interactions are governed by the 4 golden rules of Maxwell. But I want to know that is this only an assumption It is not an assumption, it is an elegant way of joining the diverse laws of electrictity and magnetism into one mathematical framework. or a practical observation The laws of ...


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If you had a neutral plasma (which can be the free charges in a metal) and you pulled the negative and positive charges apart and let them go, they would oscillate due to the electrostatic potential. This is an excitation known as a plasma oscillation. A Plasmon is the quasiparticle associated with plasma oscillations (analogous to phonons being the ...


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There's no difference between plasmon and plasmon polariton. Both of them indicate the resonant excitations involving electromagnetic wave and collective electronic motions simultaneously. "surface" stresses that the excitation in many cases occurs at the interface of a metal and a dielectric. However, there exist bulk plasmons as well. So "surface ...


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The effect of each $O_2$ molecule on the susceptibility is almost the same in both phases. The magnetic susceptibility of the liquid oxygen is about 1,000 times higher simply because it's a liquid and the density of liquids is about 1,000 times larger than the density of gases (it's more or less true whether you count the density as mass per unit volume or ...



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