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A capacitor is often used for "decoupling". The wires into any electrical appliance have inductance (because they are long and thin). This means that if there is a sudden increased demand in current, there will be a significant voltage drop. A capacitor can act as a "tiny battery" that briefly supplies this current while the main supply catches up. A fan ...


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There is no notion of quantization of charge in classical electrodynamics. Charge is a continuous, infinitely divisible quantity there, and there's nothing at all that would indicate what carries the charge. The electron (or any other particle, for that matter) is not predicted by classical electrodynamics, and thus none of the classical notions of ...


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By your parition $A=L\cup R$, we have that \begin{gather}&\oint_A \left( \boldsymbol J + \varepsilon_0\frac{\partial \boldsymbol E}{\partial t} \right) \cdot d\boldsymbol S = 0 &\implies\\ &\int_L \left( \boldsymbol J + \varepsilon_0\frac{\partial \boldsymbol E}{\partial t} \right) \cdot d\boldsymbol S + \int_R \left( \boldsymbol J + ...


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Yes indeed. Assuming that by storing static electricity you mean storing an electric charge directly then there is currently a lot of interest in devices called supercapacitors that do exactly this. In particular they are being investigated for use in electric vehicles. Storing a high charge density in a capacitor is hard because it produces a very strong ...


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Each electron has a fixed charge of $-1.602\times10^{-19}\,\mbox{C}$ (where (C stands for coulombs). If you gather $6.24\times10^{18}$ electrons, the total charge will be \begin{align*} \mbox{Total charge} &= \mbox{Charge per electron}\times\mbox{Number of electrons}\\ &= ...


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Is it possible for electrons to carry more than one charge? If by, one charge, you mean more electric charge than (the negative of) the elementary charge, the answer is no. More specifically, an 'electron' would not be an electron if its charge were not $-e$. However, electric charge is not the only type of charge electrons 'carry'. But this is a ...


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All of our observations in particle physics have led to the so called standard model of physics. The particles in the table are characterized with several quantum numbers, spin, lepton number, baryon number, charge and a mass This states that all particles of matter are made out of a basic number of elementary particles, with very specific rules ...


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Many fan motors are single phase, permanent split capacitor (PSC) induction motors. Single phase motors inherently have no starting torque and to get around this problem, engineers often "trick" the motor into thinking it is being supplied by 2 phases instead of one. This is done by adding a second set of windings to the motor that are physically offset to ...


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Is there a center-of-charge kind of concept where that point remains stationary when a neutral particle splits into two or more charged particles ? Not when there are external forces acting on the system. As soon as the particle breaks down, the two charged particles experience magnetic force in the same direction, so their sum momentum changes and the ...


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Rubbing a balloon generates a static electric charge. Some electrons are separated of their nuclei. Electrons have a repulsive force on each other. They are located on the spherical shape of the balloon. Uniformly distributed because of their repulsion. Touching the ballon, these electrons flow - a small electic shock. Moving electrons are called electric ...


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Short answer: If you want to analyze things in the electrons' rest frame in wire A (whose electrons move at less than half the speed, relative to the wire, as the electrons in wire B), you have to take into account not just the electric force on the electrons in the wire A, which will be repulsive as you say, but also the electric force on the positive ...


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If you integrate acceleration w.r.t. time, you'll get the change in velocity. If you add the initial velocity to that and integrate again, you'll find the change in position. what they mean by calculate the "path" is find the function that describes its position w.r.t. time.



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