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Centrifugal force is a pseudo force; the effects you experience from it are due to centripetal force. If you were to eliminate the centripetal force, you would stop going in circular motion and would also no longer feel any centrifugal "force"


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A pseudoforce, like centrifugal force, the Coriolis force, or gravity, is a correction term we use in order to be able to apply standard physical models to accelerating reference frames, when the alternatives (rotational motion, rotation in 3-space, or relatativity) are conceptually or computationally harder to deal with. Imagine the following problem ...


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The force you feel when you round a corner in your car is the friction force of the car seat on your behind, and perhaps the pushing force of the door on your shoulder. These are very real forces that occur when your car tries to turn while your body tries to continue moving in a straight line. But from your point of view in the car, with the windows ...


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Suppose you are at a red light in your car. You apply Newton's second law on the street light. $$F=ma$$ $$F=0N, a=0ms^{-2}$$$$0N=0N$$ It works!! Now the light turns green and you start accelerating. Suppose your acceleration is $1ms^{-2}$. According to you, you are at rest. Do you see your nose moving? Apparently not. It means your body is at rest wrt you. ...


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If you have ever seen a pizza being made by hand, you will know that when the baker throws the disk of dough in the air, he makes it spin. As he does so, the pizza "disk" gets bigger because the dough on the outside experiences a larger centrifugal force (in the rotating frame of reference of the pizza. Don't start on "there is no such thing", you asked for ...


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There is a wikipedia article which describes the effect http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equatorial_bulge Basically the bulge is caused by the rotation of the Earth. The centripetal force is given by $F=m\omega^2 r$. Therefore the poles feel a lesser force than the equator which wants to spin out into a disc. This is balanced by gravity which wants the Earth to ...


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The question seems to be wrong. If they want to know tangential acceleration, they should have given angular acceleration. From given things , 'r' , 'v', and "mu" we can only find centripetal acceleration. And as you said you are getting answer 5 m/s². How it is possible?


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Sit in the frame of car if you are having problems. Apply tangential and centrifugal pseudo forces. As we are at rest, friction has to act of same magnitude of their resultant and in opposite direction. The answer will be $4ms^{-2}$ $0.5 \times 10=\sqrt{3^2+a_t^2}$ $a_t=4ms^{-2}$


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Consider a lift with its rope snapped. The lift would be falling freely. An observer is inside the lift (tough luck for him!) releasing the ball just at the moment of the free fall. Since the ball and lift would be falling freely the ball would appear to float. Thus, to the observer in the lift, it would seem as if no force is acting upon the ball, using ...


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Here, because the coin is placed at the center, the centrifugal forces balance each other. Every point mass in the coin has it's conjugate point at the diameter passing through it and on the same distance from the center on the other side. Hence the coin is under equilibrium and does not fly off.


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The coin will not move. First, to differentiate between centrifugal and centripetal, I'll start by stating the definitions first. Centrifugal force is the apparent force that draws a rotating body away from the center of rotation. It is caused by the inertia of the body as the body's path is continually redirected. Centripetal force is a force that makes ...


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The direction of the inertia propagation is the direction of the velocity. Any acceleration can be applied to change the velocity. If the acceleration has the same direction of the velocity you will change only its modulo, but if you want to change the direction of the velocity (which is your "line of inertia") you need "a force that push from the side" or, ...


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The centripetal force can actually be measured. If you take the slingshot as an example, while rotating the end-mass you can measure a tension in the stings of the slingshot. If you stop the motion of the end-mass at a certain point in time, you can observe a velocity of the mass, that is tangential to the circular path it is taking over time. The strings ...


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A particle does not have to move in the direction of the acceleration. Acceleration is change in velocity, so the change in velocity is in the direction of acceleration. Velocity, being a vector, obeys certain Laws of vector addition(see traingle law and parallelogram law of vector addition). For example, if two forces(another vector) of equal magnitude are ...


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There are several issues occurring here- none of which require a "fictitious force" to resolve. 1) the acceleration on the shot cannot operate in the direction of it's velocity as the shot in the sling maintains a constant distance from the slinger while it is being "slung". 2) there is no "centrifugal" force on the shot... the shot attempts to follow ...


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I think your confusion with the slingshot is this: when you move your hand in circles to keep the slingshot moving in a circle you need some force, so you feel the weight of the projectile. But you where taught that according to Newton, things want to keep going in a straight line and inertia is this tendency to "not want to move or change direction". So ...


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Okay, let's lay some ground rules: An object that does not experience any force will fly in a straight line A force applied to an object will change its momentum toward the direction of the force. Now, the trick with circular motion is that both the direction of motion and the direction of the force change simultaneousely, such that the inward cetripetal ...


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Momentum is a vector, and the job of a force is to change it, in magnitude and direction. The ball has tangential momentum at any point, and when the force is perpendicular only the direction of momentum is affected. You can think of the force as a reaction force needed to keep the ball in a circle, and since it is perpendicular to the direction of motion, ...


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The direction of acceleration is the same direction for the propagation of inertia usually! This is where you are wrong. Direction of propagation is the direction in which the body is currently moving or rather, changing position. So it is the direction of infinitesimal displacement $d\vec x$ at that instant. Now what makes you think that direction of ...


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Fictitious forces naturally arise in non-inertial (accelerating) reference frames and you have to be careful with them. In this example, it only leads to confusion. $F = ma$ tells us that when the (total) force is zero, the object will continue in a straight line. It's not the centripetal force, but the absence of a centripetal force that makes the object ...



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