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The movement comes from push, or pull. A push, or pull comes from one of the forces. For example, a push happens when two things/fields can not co-exist at same point of space time and one (or both) of them get displaced. The displacement, is the movement. The forces govern how things behave. Movement is one of the behaviors caused/governed by forces.


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One approach to exploring this question is to study the Glider in Conway's Game of Life. Where does its movement "come from"? It is a direct and easily-verified result of the rules of its universe. I highly recommend you take a few minutes with graph paper to verify its behaviour for yourself. What is really important to see is that motion is not a law ...


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At a basic level, current models of physics describe a force as the exchange of (virtual) bosons. This is just a model, but here's the general gist at what's a very basic level: There are different types of fundamental forces: Strong, electroweak (electromagnetic + weak) and gravitational. On top of this, there is the Higgs Boson. The strong force is ...


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Physics is the discipline that studies natural phenomena, and finds mathematical models that fit the measurements and observations and also predict future behavior of the system under study. Mathematics is a discipline which studies numbers with sophisiticated methods, it has axioms and theorems and can prove statements or disprove them absolutely. To use ...


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Many of the answers given above are wrong. The word "causal" is not subjective. One of the answers includes the analogy: if I (the charge) throw a ball (the electric field) at a lamp, was the cause of the lamp breaking (the change in the magnetic field) the ball or me? But this is not a good analogy because the two cases are not at all similar. If a ...


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If we define some event which we will call "p" to be the cause and "q" to be its effect, then p and q should satisfy the following rules, 1.p implies q but q doesn't imply p. 2.in the absense of p, q shouldn't exist either. 3.p and q shouldn't be simultaneous events as viewed from any inertial frame of reference.


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The causality of the response, along with the fact that it would never introduce imaginary-valued D as a response to real-valued E, stipulates that the spectra of permittivity conform to the Kramers-Kronig relations. These form a very tight relation between the real and imaginary parts of permittivity. In particular, each part is a Hilbert transform of the ...



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