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If we identify a force as a scattering process, i.e. with a mediator of some interactions, then this need not be a vector boson of course. One can speak of "Higgs" force for instance if the process under consideration is mediated by the the Higgs (which is a scalar). There are also numerous cases where the interaction is mediated by a fermion. Therefore, ...


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The situation is not symmetric at all: This diagram describes a force between two fermions, but a diagram such as just doesn't exist (in the Standard Model). Fermions can in fact mediate a force between bosons, like in: Such diagrams are highly suppressed loop diagrams though, and the one above would after renormalization be seen as just one ...


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I think that this is more about the historical construction of the theory than about the actual interactions. In a lagrangian, two fields A, B interact when there is a product term of both such as AB. So, I see no real fundamental distinction there, even with more complicated expressions. But when one introduces the interaction bosons, it's by the mean of ...



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