Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

There are multiple ways to interpret Coulomb's law in quantum electrodynamics (QED). Interestingly, they don't lead to quite the same conclusion (but there is no inconsistency because they are not defined in the same way). The most commonly used way (that ACuriousMind refers to in his comment) consists in relating the notion of classical potential with that ...


2

Can we have electronics with charge carriers OTHER than electrons? Yes, see what Sebastian said above. And see the physicsworld article Taming light at the nanoscale: "Look around, and you will probably see numerous electronic and optical gadgets, such as mobile phones, personal digital assistants, laptops, TVs and digital cameras. These may all do ...


4

Depending on your view, there is electronics with other charge carriers. It is commonplace to have semiconductor devices where the relevant carriers are holes! Furthermore, batteries and electrolysis relies heavily on ions as charge carriers (but hardly count as electronics). I guess genuine electronics with ions will be difficult as charge carrier mobility ...


0

You need something that can be conducted along the wire to power electronics; if you were to get protons, rather than spreading from atom to atom you'd just end up changing the element of the atom or splitting it. The closest thing that you can do other than add electrons is chemically charge it, as in replace the batteries.


1

I think it is best to answer the question "What are gravitons?" to find out what they do. In quantum field theory, one constructs fields from representations of the Poincare group. The Poincare group has a rotation subgroup, so the fields have certain transformation properties under rotations, which we refer loosely to as the particle's spin. From this ...


0

In quantum field theory we describe the interaction between two particles, $A$ and $B$, as being due to the exchange of a gauge boson - call this $X$. So $A$ emits a gauge boson $X$ of mass $m_X$ that travels over to particle $B$ and is absorbed. If the lifetime of the gauge boson is $t_X$ then the range will be of order $ct_X$: $$ d \approx ct_X \tag{1} $$ ...


1

$$\Delta E \Delta t \sim \hbar$$ This is a version of the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle. Instead of using momentum and position,however,the above form uses energy and time ($\Delta$ means change in). How can the uncertainty principle be used to deduce range of a force from properties of the force carrier? Let's take the simplest example: the ...


0

Yes, I know gravitons are 'just a theory', but I'm wondering how they theoretically act. To echo Anna's answer, but putting it more bluntly: they don't. And see how John Rennie mentioned Matt Strassler's article? See this line from it: "A virtual particle is not a particle at all". Electrons and protons don't throw photons at one another. Hydrogen atoms ...


3

From the analogue of simple quantum mechanics Feynman diagrams, the graviton is what is being exchanged for two particles to feel an attractive force. Analogous to the exchange of a photon for the electron to interact with another electron. first order feynman diagram electron electron interaction The analogous diagram for the gravitational ...



Top 50 recent answers are included