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How can a scattering process have bound states? We are familiar with bound states from our everyday experience. For example, two hydrogen atoms interact through the Coulomb force. This leads to the formation of a bound state, namely, the hydrogen molecule. The most simple model of this situation is the square-well potential. This potential has ...


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At constant pressure the volume of an ideal gas is given by Charles' law: $$ V \propto T $$ and this law tells us that when the temperature $T$ falls to zero the volume $V$ also becomes zero. But no gas is ideal and real gases show all sorts of non-ideal behaviour. For example real gases liquify then solidify as the temperatue falls. Real gases deviate ...


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TL;DR: The Gross-Pitaevskii equation is only applicable for very weakly-interacting bosons. At $a=\infty$ the gas displays universal physics. Strictly speaking, the Gross-Pitaevskii equation (GPE) is only valid for $$na^3 \ll 1,$$ where $n$ is the density of particles and $a$ is the $s$-wave scattering length. As it is a mean-field theory, one has to look ...


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Since the non-interacting condensate is a pathological situation (it is not a superfluid), I will assume that by "traditional" you mean a (perhaps extremely) weakly interacting condensate. I will denote the repulsive interaction strength (the T-matrix) by $g>0$. For simplicity, I will describe the situation at very low temperatures. The elementary ...


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The short answer is that you have to work with particle densities, namely, $$n=N/V,$$ where $N$ is the number of particles, and $V$ is the volume of your system. The long answer is as follows. Working in the thermodynamic ensemble with a fixed chemical potential $\mu$, and knowing that the Bose-Einstein distribution gives the average number density of ...


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In the field of multi-component condensates, the single mode approximation (SMA) means that different dipole states are assumed to share the same spatial wave function. Thus, there are no dipolar textures. SMA is well justified when the inter-component (e.g., spin-dependent or dipole) interactions are much weaker than the interactions independent of the ...


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In the context of ultracold Fermi gases, a BEC-BCS crossover means that by tuning the interaction strength (the s-wave scattering length), one goes from a BEC state to a BCS state without encountering a phase transition (thus the word "crossover"). It is also useful to know that the BEC state is a Bose-Einstein condensate of two-atom molecules, while the ...



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