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There are several ways to create Bose-Einstein condensates or systems that behave that way, there are ultracold atomic gases, solid state quasiparticles, and even photon condensates. Since you are obviously interested in ultracold atomic gases, I am going to cite Experimental methods of ultracold atomic physics by Kurn and Thywissen: The material must ...


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I think the answer should be "no", as they are phenomena happening in two different sectors. That is, Bose-Einstein condensation involves the center-of-mass degrees of freedom of each atom. On the other hand, radioactive decay pertains to the internal interactions among constituent subatomic particles.


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There are several ways to destroy a Bose-Einstein condensate. The most common is temperature, which is why BECs are all low-temperature phenomena. For instance, helium becomes superfluid when a large fraction of the atoms enter the same quantum state, which happens around $\mathrm{2\,K = \frac16\,meV}/k$, so apparently the first excited state in fluid helium ...


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Some may exclude superfluid 3He from being a Bose-Einstein condensate because it obeys Fermi-Dirac statistics. However, this viewpoint is also not quite clear cut as the 3He form Cooper pairs which then condense. However, even those pairs do not obey Bose-Einstein statistics but nonetheless condense. Therefore this question is a little murky and Wikipedia ...



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