New answers tagged

-1

Take an egg, crack it and pour it out on a hot pan. The proteins are subjected to heat and they change their conformational shape. The heat causes these proteins to thermally vibrate more violently until these vibrations are sufficient to push the proteins into a different shape. In general the cooking of meat does much the same.


4

Yes folded proteins do fluctuate even in their native/folded state. They do not fluctuate like a polymer chain in good solvent for example but rather like atoms in a solid, where the concept of neighbours in 3 dimensions is well defined enabling one to give labels to the residues if needed. For that reason people in the community call these states "ordered ...


0

I always understood that a smell is caused by minute particles of the substance being emitted at a rate relative to the stability and temperature into the air thereby entering the nasal passage of recipient. The question is, do you inhale obnoxious particles that you would normally repel.


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What gives smell to those odorous chemical compounds Your nose and your brain. First of all, there are just some molecules flowing through your nose. There are many receptor neurons that react to those molecules and send "signals" to your brain. In the end, you smell something. It's the same with light: light really is just an electromagnetic wave of ...


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Even though it is called membrane potential, it's actually the potential difference between inner and outer cell, so in other words potential difference across the membrane. Since there is a potential difference of around -70mV in a standard animal cell (interior being the negative), it's normal that a bit more of the negative ions will arrange near the ...


-2

I have been wandering that same question for 40 years...I have asked all kinds of doctors and researchers, only to see a glaze form over their eyes. The question, I think, is not whether it exists, but how do you measure it. The problem is figuring out the machine that can measure it. And then, where to measure, because I think there will be not only an ...


2

The ball-park answer is 1.5 GeV per wing beat. Here’s how we get that: To start, take the case of a mosquito hovering in a fixed position with no breeze. This keeps the problem relatively simple, and should give us a pretty good ball-park/order-of-magnitude estimate (even though hovering requires somewhat less energy than, for example, flying upward, or ...


2

Based on your mention of electricity, and of a "welding rod", I will assume you are talking about arc welding. From Lincoln Electric: "Arc welding is one of several fusion processes for joining metals. By applying intense heat, metal at the joint between two parts is melted and caused to intermix - directly, or more commonly, with an intermediate ...


4

Walking requires raising and lowering the centre of gravity, as well as moving the limbs. Both of these require muscles to contract and extend and use energy. If the muscles were perfect springs then the energy stored during contraction could be fully recovered during extension. No energy would be lost. But they are not perfect springs - some energy is ...


1

To understand why holding objects costs energy even though the work appears to be zero, you have to understand how muscles work. When you are holding an object, your muscles are contracted. The process of muscle contraction consists in a protein filament called Myosin pulling another filament, called Actin. Since this is a dynamical process (the Actin ...


0

In simple words its just like if you are standing in-front of a small wave you won't be affected that much when that wave hits you but if its a large one then you will definitely be affected a lot, its just all about force and pressure, the louder and bassy it gets the more the pressure and force that hits your heart mind ears and almost every part of your ...


0

(Others can correct me if I'm wrong, but...) I think the answer is no. Not even theoretically. Humans are basically diamagnetic, because they are mostly water. Therefore, if you got a large enough magnet, you could repel (or levitate) a person with it, but you could not possibly attract a person with it. Look up the Ignobel Prize for levitating a frog. ...


2

When you work "fairly hard", your body can produce about 200 W of power - enough for two incandescent bulbs. Top athletes can produce more - in short bursts. Your body is roughly 25% efficient in converting "calories" (which are actually kilo calories) to Joules - meaning that if you work out hard enough to burn 600 kcal per hour, then you actually produced ...


2

A (kilo)calorie is a unit of energy, while a watt is a unit of power, which describes the rate at which energy is expended. So a 100W bulb is using 100 joules a second. A kcal is about 4184 joules, so a 100W bulb takes about 42 seconds to consume (really: convert into light and heat) a kcal. The joule is the SI (derived) unit of energy. Units of energy ...


4

An average person uses approx. 1500-2500kcal/day. Since one kcal equals 4148J in SI units, that's between 6.2-10.4MJ per day. A day has 86400 seconds, which brings us to an average power consumption of 72-120W... about as much as a light bulb. :-) Physical exercise varies between light (300kcal/h) at an additional 350W to very strenuous at probably six ...


0

From the library of expert witnesses: The fundamental theory for voice identification rests on the premise that every voice is individually characteristic enough to distinguish it from others through voiceprint analysis. There are two general factors involved in the process of human speech. The first factor in determining voice uniqueness lies in the ...


1

The simple answer is that different people have different pain thresholds Your gender, your stress level, and your genes all contribute to your sensitivity to pain.


1

All the above ranges of the given electric current is in A.C. Hence, even 1 milliamp of a.c. current is dangerous for us. The reason for this is that our body has a capacitive property which lets the a.c. current to pass through us and we fell a shock even at a very low current. But d.c. current of 1mA or even 1A don't appear to be dangerous. All this is ...


5

Nitrogen is not liquefied in these conditions at all. What happens is that when pressure increases, nitrogen's solubility in blood increases (this is a general property of gases: their solubility in liquids always increases with pressure) When a diver decompresses properly (i.e. quite slowly) the nitrogen is released from the blood slowly (due to the now ...


3

Replace "magnetically charged" by "magically charged" - I would rather agree to that :) (and that's actually how I read it by mistake! ;)) Writing of magnetic charges (=monopoles) actually doesn't increase the plausibility. I think it's just a hoax (I mean, that the university is involved, not the whole business) - though this word would be not ...



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