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In lower gravity, you could expect to swim faster I am not answering the other questions as I do not have much more to say which is not already said in other answers. But I do disagree with their conclusion that swimming would be the same. Regarding swimming, one would need a better understanding of swimming motion to decide how much effect can be expected ...


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Swimming would be nearly identical to a 1g planet, other than the splash being bigger. The forces involved in swimming are largely horizontal, so as long as there is some gravity to keep the water where it belongs you are acting against the viscosity of the water rather than the weight of the water. Might be a problem at very low g as you would splash away ...


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Interesting question. 1 and 2 I agree with you. 3 - I think swimming would be similar to on earth - from the point of view of floating on the surface what counts is the density and our bodies and water have similar density - we are a bit less dense and float - swimming we force our bodies to go through water against the resistance of the water, which ...


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1) You'd be able to jump pretty high correct? Two or three times whatever you could on earth? Since you would have the same strength as on earth, the initial kinetic energy of your jump would be the same as on earth. Since your mass is the same as on earth, your initial jump velocity is the same as on earth. Thus the height to which you jump would be ...


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Well, this one's a bit less tedious and easier to understand. It all depends on how a blender actually works. The most common blenders have a couple of vertical knives as blades included. When these knives rotate, a tornado of air with a vortex is created . The vertical blades push the veggies upwards creating the vortex, the horizontal ones then slice off ...


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When you push something and it remains at rest your muscles transfer energy through isostatic muscle contraction/respiration. This means that even though the muscles don't move they convert the glucose into respiratory energy for muscle contraction that will be dissipated eventually by heating the surroundings. The only work done is that in contracting the ...


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There is another problem here. How to shield humans from the hard radiation (high energy protons and neutrons) from the Sun and Galactic cosmic ray sources, once outside the Earth's magnetosphere. Analysis of data from instruments on board the Mars Curiosity spacecraft and on the Rover itself, allowed Zeitlin et al. (2014) to compare the equivalent ...


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Money certainly is one issue, but it is far from the only issue. It isn't even the biggest issue. Issue #1: Humans need air, water, and food. We can live without air for a few seconds, without water for a few hours, without food for a few days. And then we die. We need air, water, and food. And we don't know how to do that on Mars. There are conjectures ...


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By definition, work is the energy required by a force to displace something. So, you're not doing any work, you're just cancelling out the force being applied to you. If you wouldn't push back then the other force would be doing work by displacing you. So, your work done basically cancelled out the work done by the other force.


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In the physics definition of "work done" energy is transferred from one object (the one doing the work) to another object or system. When you push against the stationary stone you apply effort but the energy transfer is all internal to you own body - glucose being metabolized, etc. You get tired but you do no work according to the definition above.


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In your case, no work is done. Intuitively: If you want to move a wall, you could push on it and you might use a lot of force. The wall isn't moving, and you are simply "wasting" your energy in your muscles. You are not doing any work of any value. If you push a balloon you can push it far without any real effort. You might move it a long way but that ...


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The size of the image in frequency domain $f_{max}$ is inversely proportional to the grid spacing in real space $\Delta x$. (i.e. the finer step, the hight frequency you can sample). And grid spacing step in frequency domain $\Delta f$ is inversely proportional to size of real space image $ x_{max}$ ( i.e. the longer interval of data you have, the more ...


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Molecular simulation is certainly used in the field of astrobiology. For example, here's a quote from a NASA technical report specifically on Molecular Simulations in Astrobiology: We use computer simulations to address the following, questions about these proteins: (1) How do small proteins (peptides) organize themselves into ordered structures at ...


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1 horsepower is 746 Watts and was designed to compare the power of steam engines with the work done by horses. You appear to be looking for some comparable number for humans, but of course it depends on the human, so can only be arbitrary. A reasonable comparison for mechanical work done by an engine could be that provided by someone riding a bicycle. An ...


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Gravitational potential is defined such that it is $0$ at infinity, and has negative values at all points other than the one at infinity. So, an object technically has the highest gravitational potential at infinity. (an extremely extremely far distance.) The incline can be considered as path from an area of lower gravitational potential to a higher one. ...


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The sun gets its energy from the nuclear fusion, mainly the fusion of hydrogen atoms to form helium atoms. This energy passes through the vacuum of space via Electromagnetic radiation. Plants collect some of this radiation and use it to perform photosyntheses, which in turn is used to make carbohydrates and such. You eat that plant or some other animal ...


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When you walk up a hill, pushing a bicycle or not, you increase your potential energy by spending chemical energy. One of the reasons you need to eat is to ingest fuel, so to speak, that allows you to spend energy on doing your daily tasks. For example, your body can metabolize sugar (most notably glucose) by oxidizing it, which frees energy that you then ...


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Consider a muscle fibre as a thin rod of "spring constant" K = Y.A/L. Y= modulus of elasticity. Energy stored as potential = 1/2 stress * strain * volume. which is proportional to cube of length. Now jump height achieved = energy/ (mass * g) hence jump height remains unchanged!



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