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1

One answer lies in utility and the evolutionary origin of our eyesight. Our eye is basically the same as that of a fish. Water absorbs red light. It absorbs near infrared even more strongly. Fish didn't evolve the ability to see in the near infrared because this strong absorption would make that capability rather useless. Near infrared would also be rather ...


1

There are many variables that come into play in an armwrestling match, but one answer as to why a person with a larger hand and wrist has an advantage in armwrestling has less to do with strength, and more to do with leverage. In armwrestling, you and your opponent lock hands and attempt to pin each other to a pad on either side of the table. To pin your ...


3

Not discounting other traits, is there something about six legs that has helped insects achieve this success? Spiders oftentimes have eight legs, mammals oftentimes have four. But centipedes have lots of legs, and millipedes have lots of legs. The reason mammals have four legs, and millipedes have lots and lots of legs isn't so much about optimality so ...


5

Mobile phones output UHF and long microwave frequency radiation; roughly 1GHz. These are not ionising radiations, which begin at ultraviolet light frequencies and above (several eV photon energies and above). 1eV is about 250THz, or five orders of magnitude greater than GHz photons in energy per photon. GHz photons thus have negligible effect on atoms and ...


0

There are no bad effects, only possibly psychological effects caused by worrying too much about the dangers of electromagnetic radiation that in reality do not exist. Note also that in much more serious cases where there is potentially a big risk due to ionizing radiation like in case of the Fukushima disaster and in Chernobyl, the main health problems in ...


6

I can think of two possible reasons: first, you can have half your legs up in the air at one time (as in walking - two on one side and one on the other, then change) and still be perfectly stable (3 legs = most stable, like a tripod); and second, if a predator chews off a leg on either side, you still have two legs (so you can still walk). I think those ...


1

I think the latter two questions may lend themselves to order of magnitude estimation approaches, but I don't think the first one does. Q1: Why is our body temperature around 30 °C? The first clue is in the original definition of the Celsius scale: 0 °C the freezing point of water and 100 °C the boiling point. Life as we know it relies on chemistry and a ...


1

Assuming you do survive the impact with the water, according to this answer all you need is 4m.


0

Ilya Prigogine and the school of non-equilibrium thermodynamics has investigated the emergence of structure in chemistry and biology away from equilibrium. In these cases chemical clocks (and by implication biological clocks) can be seen as complex systems forming structures away from equilibrium. These are refered also as "TEMPORAL DISSIPATIVE STRUCTURES" ...


1

i will give another answer (or maybe two related answers). Smell and taste as raw signals relate to specific molecules and their bio-chemical properties which cannot be simulated electronicaly. Not to mention the brain processes involved (do we actually see the same color or just agree on same name of a color?). On the other hand, audio or visual signals, ...


0

I think the OP is referring to either optogenetics or the fact that the skull is transparent to IR light and can affect chemical processes in the brain.


1

UV rays are absorbed by skin and bone. In order to expose the brain to UV rays, you would have to remove it from the skull, which would have the totally irrelevant side effect of interfering with the brain's functioning.



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