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1) What can be say about the work done by the man to the weight? Unlike gravity, the force exerted by the man is in general not constant, does not depend only on position of the body (you may apply different force on the weight at the same height $h$ on the way up vs. on the way down), and is not conservative (does not arise from a potential). When the ...


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1&2) Let's suppose there are only two forces in play: the one exerted by the man, and weight. The sum of works done on the body equals the variation of kinetic energy (this is a theorem of mechanics; I fail to find its English name). Since the body has no velocity at the start and at the end, the sum of works is zero. The net work done by the man on ...


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The correct statement is - the total work done on the weight is zero i.e. the total energy of the weight before and after the experiment is same. However, when the man is lifting the weight he is obviously working against gravity. More importantly, when he is lowering the weight, he is still working against gravity, as gravity would rather lower the weight ...



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