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You feel cold when heat is flowing from you to the surroundings, your body tries to burn more energy to keep up your temperature, so you shiver. Water conducts heat much more effectively than air (more than 100x as well) so even with water at the same temperature as air you will lose a lot more heat and feel cold. When your body is too hot it losses energy ...


4

When you feel hot, you perspire so as to benefit by evaporative cooling. As the relative humidity gets closer to 100%, the sweat cannot evaporate and evaporative cooling becomes less effective. Liquid water is a much better conductor of heat than air (even humid air) is, so if the water is even a few degrees cooler than your body, you feel cold because the ...


2

You can calculate the air drag along your arms using the formula for air drag, $F = \frac{1}{2} \rho u^2 c_D A$, takin $u$ the speed at which they'll effectively move relative to air, and $A$ their projected area on the plane perpendicular to motion. $\rho$ is the density of air, that's why it's so much less efficient than in water. $c_D$ will be close to ...


1

There's an important difference between liquid water and water vapor. The difference is 539 calories per gram to be exact. That's why being in humid air makes you hotter - the water vapor has all this latent heat it can release upon you by condensing. Equivalently, it prevents your sweat from evaporating and absorbing this energy. Liquid water doesn't have ...


1

You are describing two different mechanisms of cooling the human body: 1) When we sweat our body produces fluids that tranfer heat from us through their evaporation (fluids gets the heat from our body and evaporate). One can easily understand that the more the surrounding enviroment has a highly humidity value , the more this heat- transfer gets ...



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