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Our current understanding says that the entirety of spacetime, matter, and energy was compressed to a singularity. Our current understanding also says that it is impossible to know anything about what happened on the other side of the singularity. Therefore, there is no answer to your question that does not involve pure speculation or theology.


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In the standard homogeneous cosmological models the total energy in an expanding volume is zero. This is true for positive, negative or zero curvature and it must take into account the gravitational energy (which is negative), dark energy, matter and heat. Since the gravitational energy is negative the heat can be positive and increasing as you go back ...


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In Zero-Energy Model, negative energy associated with Gravity counterbalances positive energy associated with matter, photons, etc. So, No, Big Bang wasn't cold. You are just looking at partial picture (you just ignored Gravity). This is what Zero-Energy Model says: With traditional Big Bang model (which doesn't contain Inflation), the universe started out ...


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Fluctuations of density in the universe naturally become greater with time because matter is attracted to regions that are denser than average, and as a result they get denser still and the other regions less dense. So if there were even tiny density fluctuations in the early universe they would have grown into the density variations we see today - ...


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First off, spherical symmetry isn't really the best description. Cosmological models usually assume that the universe is (approximately) homogeneous and isotropic. That's a higher degree of symmetry than spherical symmetry. Spherical symmetry would normally be used to describe something that has a lower degree of symmetry, so that there is a center. The ...


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Here is the scenario from wikipedia According to inflation theory, the inflaton is a scalar field that is responsible for cosmic inflation in the very early universe. A quantized particle for this field is expected, similar to other quantum fields, called an inflaton. The field provides a mechanism by which a period of rapid expansion from 10^−35 to ...



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