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1

Under the scenario you presented, all you've done is made a bigger battery. Which is just sitting there, so there is no current flow. If you open up a standard 9 volt rectangular battery you will find six 1.5 volt cells connected in series, i.e. exactly as you described.


0

Based on your drawing, with the batteries all in parallel, the resistor will have the same voltage across it whether you have one battery in the circuit or more than one battery in the circuit. Assuming that each battery produces the same emf, this will give you one value of current through the resistor, regardless of how many batteries are in parallel. ...


3

Here is the question in context. I'm thinking it could be something to do with the internal resistances of the cells. Given the context, it seems reasonable to deduce that the person who wrote the question wanted you to consider the internal resistance. In real life, car batteries are made up of a series of cells. This fact makes this question ...


1

Edit: while my answer is indeed correct, RedGrittyBrick's answer properly addresses the context of the OP's question Nobody can explain why a battery made of a series of cells would not be suitable for a car battery, because such series of cells ARE INDEED suitable for car batteries. In fact, every car battery in the field today is a collection of 6 lead-...


0

The main question is unnecessarily complicated by alluding to a phone battery and its battery pack. Concentrating strictly on two "plain" batteries, one being charged to 5% of it capacity and the other charged to 35% of its capacity. The implication is that the one with the larger charge can charge the one with smaller charge. This is not necessarily true....


0

I may add a little bit of chemistry in the hope that it would be of some use to the physicists and engineers discussing the charging process of cell phone batteries using backup power source batteries. Betteries are devices that transform chemical energy into electrical energy and vice versa. The so-called secondary batteries operate in both directions ...


2

Your mistake in the above is in what you call the force required to move the charge from across the potential difference $V$. You identify the force as $\vec{F}=Q_{test}\vec{E}$, when it should be $\vec{F}=-Q_{test}\vec{E}$. This makes physical sense -- the reason it takes work to move the charge is because you need to oppose the electric field present in ...


5

Voltage is not any part of this explanation. The answer is that each battery pack stores a certain amount of energy. This is measured in joules. At its most basic level your phone battery has a certain capacity in joules, you external battery bank also has a capacity in joules. When you charge the battery you are transferring a certain number of joules from ...


22

Connecting your phone to the battery pack doesn't directly connect the cells in parallel. I assume this is where your guess of an equilibrium with equal voltage -> equal charge percentage comes from. Shorting lithium-ion / lithium-polymer (LiPo) cells together like that would likely cause one or both to literally catch fire from the high currents, or from ...


0

In case of the battery packs, there is much lighter weight requirement, and also much smaller development / manufacturing costs. But it is important to be bigger (in the sense of Ah). If you fill a cup of tea from a large jug, the cup will be full (100%) while the tea level in the jug decreases only a little bit. The Ah capacities of the batteries are ...


5

For an iPhone the battery voltage is a nominal 3.8 V and the battery pack would probably replicate the 5 V output voltage of a USB power supply. So the battery pack would be discharged as it was driving current into the positive terminal of the phone battery and thus recharge the phone battery. So only when the battery pack voltage was less than the ...


24

The key here is the voltage of both the batteries. The battery in the phone is generally at a voltage of 3.7V. The battery pack has a higher voltage or a circuit which gives a voltage of 5V to your phone. So, as long as the voltage with which you charge the phone is higher than that of the battery, the percentage of power in it doesn't matter and the phone ...


29

Sometimes it is easier to understand circuitry in the context of water. What you're imagining is two tanks of water of equal size linked together by a pipe that has been sealed off. If one tank holds 5% water and the other holds 35% water, when you remove the seal, the tanks equalize and you end up with 20% in both tanks. What you're forgetting is that ...



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