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Fresh fruits can be used as battery, for glowing bulbs, but how this is possible? I mean how electric charges can flow through fruits? Do they contain chemicals like cells? Potatoes are normally used as battery cells since they contain phosphoric acid(whereas acid batteries contained sulphuric acid) in their juice. The mechanism is nearly the same ...


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Also, say, if the external device is 11,000 mAh, then, what if at some state, such as when it reaches 3,000 mAh, the voltage falls to 4.3V, then can it still charge another device that is 5V? Or can the full 11,000 mAh energy all go to the other device? You are correct that a real battery cannot push out all of the available charge at a constant ...


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Fruits can be used as part of a battery. Fruits typically have a weak acid in an aqueous solution. Because the acid can dissociate, it is usable as a cell's electrolyte, allowing a net migration of ions from one electrode to the other. You would still need appropriate electrodes, which contain materials that participate in the chemical reactions to ...


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The article you refer to is about the electrolytic splitting of water. A 100% efficient electrolytic cell would require a voltage of about 1.23V to split water, but for various reasons a simple electrolytic cell requires about 1.48V. The difference between the voltages is called the overpotential, and it increases the amount of power needed to split the ...


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A battery is effectively an electron pump. Inside the battery a chemical reaction (typically a redox reaction) pumps electrons from the cathode to the anode. If the two ends of the battery aren't connected to anything there's nowhere for the electrons to go and the reaction stops. When you connect the battery to an external circuit the reaction resumes and ...


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You need to think of batteries as complete units. Inside, you have a chemical reaction producing the EMF. Leads are connected from the anode and cathode of the cell to the terminals on the battery. When you connect 2 batteries, all you are doing is connecting the terminals together; you are not changing the connection to the voltaic cell inside.


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Supposing that the charger gives the voltage greater than 12 V (say, 15 V), we can estimate 15 V × 100 A = 1500 W, a power of a small electric kettle. It is insufficient to effect an actual explosion quickly, but the battery will possibly immediately start to spew the acid mixed with hydrogen bubbles (note that hydrogen is flammable). Another question in: ...


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Whether EMF is a kind of voltage or not depends on terminological conventions. EMF certainly has the same dimension as the voltage (a.k.a. electric tension) has. They are customarily added or subtracted in formulae related to voltage sources such as $U = {\mathcal E} - I\cdot R_{\rm int}$. But these ${\mathcal E}$ and $U$ are no more the same quantity as ...


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The voltage across the battery when there is zero current (no load connected) is called the open circuit voltage. The emf of the battery is equal in magnitude to the open circuit voltage. I'm not certain that there is a standard term for the battery terminal voltage when a load is connected since, in general, this voltage varies with the load. One might ...



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