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The Schroedinger model does much more than people here give it credit for. It doesn't just solve the problem of why the ground state doesn't radiate. It solves the problem of why and how the excited states radiate, and it does so by using nothing other than Maxwell's equations. In the Schroedinger model, the states that don't radiate are the states with a ...


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One of the problems with Bohr's theory to describe the hydrogen atom, was that the electron orbiting around the nucleus has an acceleration. Therefore it radiates and loses energy, until it would collapse with the nucleus. This is a common error in physicist's history of physics. The problem was not with Bohr's model, but (as Bohr thought) with ...


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the magnetic field lines are re aligning as the electron orbits the nucleus. however, even though the electron is accelerating as it orbits the nucleus, it simply does not have enough energy in its orbital to radiate until it reaches the next quantum amount of energy associated with the next orbital.


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This answer I once gave for What does it mean for two objects to "touch"? discusses what touching even means. It's not a direct answer to your question, but I think it may help you view the issue in a different way. Warning: It's one of my long, talky answers that some people love and others hate. The physics in it is accurate (and for many folks, ...


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This very much depends on how you define the measurement. The simplest answer would be that the distance is zero since they are touching, but I assume you are making reference to the electromagnetic forces/Pauli exclusion principle that keep the electron clouds of the molecules and atoms from actually intersecting. However, since the electrons are in clouds ...


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I think this is a very non-trivial question and I can't give you all the answers, but I can make a few general remarks. First of all, when atoms "touch", it's really their electronic orbitals overlapping. Those interactions are, of course, governed by quantum mechanics but it is very hard to solve multi-electron atoms and complete molecules with a completely ...


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The feeling of touch is actually result of electromagnetic interactions between your hand and another object. When you "touch" a book, you're actually experiencing a repulsive force between the outermost layer of atoms and molecules on your hand, as well as the object you're touching. So, even if you could super-size an atom (which you can't), it's important ...


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Protons and neutrons are not rigid objects, but are actually mostly empty space and made up of smaller particles named quarks than move inside them pretty fast. So, you would see a mostly empty gas. The quarks themselves could either have no size, or made up of smaller particles themselves, that is not know yet. If you chose an electron instead, current ...


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A sharp knife is still several molecules thick on the edge; dull blades are even wider. So when you attempt to cut material, it needs to be ripped apart. As explained in other answers, the material either fractures along faults in the lattice, or you separate molecules (as when you cut bread). The only materials where you might split chemical bonds are ...


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Reflection,refraction and transmission of light are macroscopic manifestation of a phenomenon called scattering.In this incoming photons are absorbed and either the quantum energy level of an atom is raised (as in case of resonance absorption) or the outer electron cloud is set into motion(this is responsible for light around us).Almost instantaneously ...


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This is a great question I too have been pondering about. I think theoretically it has to do with good quantum number. The optical pumping relies on defining circular polarization transition selection rules as delta m = +1 for a RCP polarization. Why is that? It comes from the fact that B defines the quantization axes. Imagine the experiment in which B and ...


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Rather than write something unintelligible, I'll quote from a page on cesium clocks. According to quantum theory, atoms can only exist in certain discrete ("quantized") energy states depending on what orbits about their nuclei are occupied by their electrons. Different transitions are possible; those in question refer to a change in the electron and ...



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