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The entropy of a single atom does not make sense per se, unless you specify the preparation. The entropy of a single isolated atom, fixed at a point, is indeed not defined – the entropy is, after all, a property of an ensemble not of a system. The entropy of an ensemble of isolated atoms prepared at a specific energy, on the other hand, is well defined (this ...


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I guess the smallest mass would be the neutrino's, though their mass hasn't technically been determined, but it is thought to be of the order 0.05 eV.


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Fundamental values are quantised so I believe there is a 'minimum' or 'smallest' mass. If you look at the similarities between fundamental electromagnetic and gravitational interactions then its clear to see the two are very similar, with gravitational interactions being related to Mass and EM related to Charge. There is a minimum quantised Charge (e, or ...


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If we work on the theory that over decades we have been able to with the assistance of more unique scopes been able to break down these sub atomic particles then in theory, as we have in discovering quarks, these particles must be made up of even smaller particles. Our perception is only confronted by our current knowledge and capabilities, therefore in say ...


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Atoms in an element are identical. Then why they behave differently if we go to a scale containing a few atoms from a scale containing billions of atoms? It is all due to orbitals, atomic and molecular orbitals, which are the probability loci of where the electrons may be found in space. The five d orbitals in ψ(x, y, z)2 form, with a combination ...


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The approximation you are referring to is the scattering length. Neutron scattering lengths are tabulated in a few places, such as at NIST; more elaborate cross-section data is tabulated at the National Nuclear Data Center. Note that the cross section depends on the neutron energy. Most tabulated cross sections are for "thermal" neutrons with kinetic ...



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