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when the atoms collide or touché they can make either a boom or friction wich creates energy and actually energy is heat so just think of out sun when a solar flare happends the atom in it touch they explode on the sun the solar flare is actually equvilent to 1000000 nuclear bombs on earth


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You have a chain of action and reaction. There is twice the weight on our head because the forces felt by the lower block are its weight, plus the action of the top block (minus the reaction force of your head). Then how is it on a molecular scale? Well, just the same: if you imagine a crystalline solid with horizontal layers, one layer feels the action of ...


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You're mixing up different things. Two blocks of iron press your head more than one block because the Earth's gravity pulls two blocks stronger than one. This is why two blocks can tear through the paper where one can not. The molecular bit comes into consideration if you ask why the top block doesn't pass through the bottom one. This is because the ...


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If it were possible for one object to pass through another object, then it would be possible for one part of an object to pass through a different part of the same object. Therefore the question asked here is equivalent to the question of why matter is stable. See this question on mathoverflow. That question was more about the stability of individual atoms, ...


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Things are not empty space. Our classical intuition fails at the quantum level. Matter does not pass through other matter mainly due to the Pauli exclusion principle and due to the electromagnetic repulsion of the electrons. The closer you bring two atoms, i.e. the more the areas of non-zero expectation for their electrons overlap, the stronger will the ...


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![Might orbitals appear as depicted here][1] [1]: http://i.stack.imgur.com/0MYZ6.jpg This image appeared during a test and impressed me as possibly displaying orbitals or energy fluxes generated by them.


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Hydrogen bonding arises when a chemical bond is polarised to one end of it has a slight positive charge and the other has a slight negative charge. In the case of o-nitrophenol it's mainly the OH bond that is polarised - the H atom has a slight positive charge and the O atom has a slight negative charge. The charge separation means the OH bond has an ...


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In Bohr`s model postulates are 1.Electrons in atoms orbit the nucleus. 2.The electrons can only orbit stably, without radiating, in certain orbits (called by Bohr the "stationary orbits") at a certain discrete set of distances from the nucleus. These orbits are associated with definite energies and are also called energy shells or energy levels. In these ...


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It really boils down to the fact that the electrostatic potential energy between positively and negatively charged ions in an ionic crystal is inversely proportional to the separation between the ions. For instance this inverse proportionality shows up in the Madelung constant. Of course the Madelung constant is an approximation to the lattice potential ...


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An electron with total orbital angular momentum of $L^2 = \hbar^2 l(l+1)$ will experience a centrifugal force in addition to the Coulomb force from the nucleus. The result is that, in the frame rotating with the electron (don't read too much into this), the electron will see an effective potential energy given by: $$ V_l(r) = - \frac{e^2}{4 \pi \epsilon_o ...


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An excited atom in vacuum is being gently tugged by the electromagnetic field back into its ground state. This occurs even when the electromagnetic field is in its quantum mechanical ground state. Should the electromagnetic field already contain photons with energies at the transition energy, this tugging will become greater, with the result that the atom ...


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it is not just that every transition would result in the change of spin this occurs only some times which is explained below Electron Spin The Pauli Exclusion principle states that two electrons in an atom cannot have the same four quantum numbers (n, l, ml, ms) and only two electrons can occupy each orbital where they must have opposite spin states. These ...


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Your question concerning the scaffolding that makes up various metals, in relation to their appearance is a unique one. As far as I know, what determines the appearance of various metals is determined by the demarcation of the atoms that they are composed of. Various material have a statistically higher chance of reflecting the photons of a wide range of ...


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Well, we are not only looking at the electrons of an object when we look at it. What I understood your basic question to be is why we see different objects having different color. Well the reason for that is because different materials are able to reflect only certain frequencies of light. The reason for this is a little more complex. Color in itself is ...


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The colors depend on the frequency of light. Let me explain. In atoms, there are various discrete energy levels that electrons can occupy. A photon that has energy (which remember depends of its frequency) which matches exactly the difference between the electron and the next excited state, will get absorbed by that electron and get excited to the next ...


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Is it conjecture that the electron must penetrate the nucleus in order for internal conversion to occur, or is this a straightforward result? 1) it is an experimental result that K etc electrons are ejected from atoms that have radioactive nuclei 2)The probabilities of the electrons to overlap with the nucleus are given by the atomic solutions of the ...


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In the 1s 1s state (both electrons in the ground state), one electron must be spin up and the other spin down by the Pauli exclusion princple. In other words the electron spins are anti-parallel and the state is a singlet. However, if only one electron is in the 1s state, and the other electron is in a higher energy level, the two electrons can have ...


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Since the two electrons are in the 1s state, they must have opposite spins according to the Pauli exclusion principle. For helium-4 the nucleus has no spin, so it does not contribute. For helium-3, the nucleus is spin 1/2 and make a small paramagnetic contribution, so helium-3 is less diamagnetic than helium-4. Dimerization of helium also has a small ...



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