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11

In addition to answer of Autolatrty, you might want to take a look here at an experiment by Harry Swinney at U. Texas in Austin This experiment simulated the atmosphere of Jupiter and found that there was always one 'stable' vortex like Jupiter's red spot. If ever two were formed then they would quickly combine together to form one. This is a classic ...


7

Circulation in the Jovian atmosphere is different from Earth because the interior of Jupiter is fluid and lacks any solid surface so convection may occur throughout the planet's outer "molecular envelope". The vortices on Jupiter are such that since they are so large (more than 95% of anticyclones have a diamieter of $> 2000$ km) they can last from 1-3 ...


0

Take a look at wikipedia article on numerical weather simulation and Atmospheric physics In general the simulations involve complicated models and need fine-tuning and error compensations. The idea though is simple. Start with simple models of the weather (see for example Lorenz equations) Some references: ...


-1

it likely comes from nitrogen dissolved in the molten iron and nickel in the earth. A large comet would be roughly capable of delivering 1/10000 of the earths atmosphere if it where all nitrogen. They are not all nitrogen, but they have at least a fair amount. The interested reader will note that Mars has an atmosphere very rich in N2. Most likely ...


3

From what we know, the Earth's original atmosphere was not made of nitrogen (or oxygen, or carbon dioxide), but of gases such as hydrogen and helium. These would have been lost to space early on, because the Earth's gravity was not strong enough to hold on to them. The present-day oxygen came from organic sources, as you said. Here's what Wikipedia has to ...


2

Your Brazilian Professor is partly right: the high temps at the surface of Venus are partly due to the high pressures at its surface. But that's not sufficient to explain the total temp. Other factors are that Venus is a lot closer to the sun than Earth is, and of course the greenhouse effect. As a thought experiment, if you took two planets that were ...


0

Exactly the same happens as when light reflects off a metal surface. In both cases you have an electron gas that interacts with the light. In the case of a metal it's a dense (almost) free electron gas, and in the ionosphere you have a very dilute electron gas formed by ionisation of air molecules. The incoming electromagnetic wave causes the electrons to ...


3

Well, to clarify some things first In atmospheric science, or more correct: If you do the math... your only to free Variables are Density and Temperature. The equation of state which gives you the pressure, is a material property. The equations for the atmospheric variables are interconnected at any moment, it is nonsense to say P causes T or T causes P. ...


2

(I have only read the first paragraph of the question) The pressure of Venus's atmosphere is about 90x greater than that on earth. It also happens to be about 90x more dense that that on earth. Coincidence? No. The density is the reason the pressure is so high. If you were to descend 1 km into one of our oceans, the pressure would be comparable to that of ...



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