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Coriolis force: $$F_c=m v \wedge \omega$$ We need the velocity component perpendicular to the axis of rotation, which is $$v_c = v sin(\theta)$$ Now we integrate the acceleration twice with respect to time in order to get displacement: $$x = \int\left(\int{v sin(\theta)\omega dt}\right)$$ Noting that $$\theta = \frac{v.t}{R}$$ where $R$ = radius of ...


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Density is not an issue. Winds can lift planes, cars, houses, and other things much heavier. Hailstones can grow to 15 centimetres (6 in) and weigh more than 0.5 kilograms (1.1 lb). It forms in strong thunderstorm clouds, particularly those with intense updrafts, high liquid water content, great vertical extent, large water droplets, and where a good ...


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In the moist air of the clouds, the water condenses on dust particles. At the altitude where this happens, it is usually below the freezing point of water, so it quickly freezes. If winds and updrafts keep these particles of ice in the moist air, they collect more water. Eventually, the weight of the ice particles overcome the updrafts and fall to the ...


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Hailstones - or anything like sleet, snow, etc - are formed by the freezing of water. Water droplets rise up, and as the temperature keeps decreasing, they freeze at a certain point into a stone, after which this stone would start falling. Certain studies say that the stone after falling, can enter an area with differenct conditions - causing it to maybe ...


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Nice question! The answer is yes, it is certainly possible. There is no need to start at the top of the atmosphere though. The air around the earth has a density (and pressure) gradient that increases as you get closer to the surface, see the figure below. If you have an object whose average density is less than the atmosphere at the ground, then it will ...


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You need to consider the pressure on the cube. The cube would have a certain initial average density (mass of the steel divided by the volume of the cube). The cube would sink to at least a level of its average density. Then the pressure would begin to crush the cube, decreasing the volume and increasing the density. The cube would progressively be ...


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The total pressure of the gas in a closed mixture is the sum of the so called partial pressures of the gasses: the pressure of each gas in that container if it were alone. In a container that you could have in a lab, the differences in gravity in all the points are neglegible, so you can assume the pressure is constant. But, if the vessel is big enough and ...



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