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Could be that the expanding gasses behind the projectile diminish faster as the outside air influenced the outcome ,herefore decreasing ramp time(bullet arc)wich lead to bullet drop on its intended path!pesonal experience in sub tempreatures using a 45acp had the same outcome at 15metres.2seprate 1911 pistols were fired and both litterally experienced bullet ...


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I believe that despite the difficulties you'd have getting the atmosphere to rush into a tube, that would be the far easier of the two problems you'd have. The bigger problem is dealing with all that air. Where would it go if not back to earth? Since we're talking about science fiction, I propose the following technology to make it work. Suppose you ...


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The first version of the question asked about just sucking up the atmosphere with a hose, without manipulating gravity. I'll answer that first, since I think it's a very good question that many — including my previous self — get wrong. No manipulation of gravity They did this with a giant vacuum cleaner in the movie Spaceballs. But as knzhou comments, it ...


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For many—but not all—shielding processes the parameters of interest are proportional to the areal density, $$ \text{Range} \propto \frac{\text{areal density}}{\text{mass density}} = \frac{\sigma}{\rho} \,,$$ so a first expectation would be that the same areal density of material (of roughly the same composition) will have the same effect. I don't have the ...


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In simple terms, the glass is being constantly shaken by weather. There isn't very much difference in mass between Oxygen and Nitrogen and the air at low altitudes is dense enough that molecules collide after a very short distance and so the atmosphere is very well mixed. At very high altitudes where the density is very low there is no weather, and little ...


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I think, after reading what´s written above, we must make a distinction between systems that are big and little, like the atmosphere and a single billiard ball. I´s clear that a billiard ball on a table makes a journey that deviates more and more from the path it would have taken hadn´t you give a slightly different direction in velocity. Consider now a ...


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It's all density. Gravity should start to immediately pull it down. The density of the cloud nor atmosphere can hold it up. More than up draft would be needed


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Have a look at the answers to Pressure and altitude as they explain how the pressure:altitude equation is derived. There is nothing wrong with our working, but you have assumed that the temperature is constant and in reality the temperature falls with altitude (in the troposphere at least). That means the pressure falls more rapidly with height than your ...


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After further research, I've concluded that the ideal gas law would work for Venus' supercritical fluid atmosphere, at least reasonably well enough for my curiosity, and certainly as well as it would here on Earth. My research took me to learning compressibility factor, equations of state, and several other real gas topics. From what I gather, a gas ...



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