Tag Info

New answers tagged

4

Occam suggests that the sounds are either able to be explained as typical noises that 'just happen' or are hoaxes. It is unfortunately extremely common for a large number of copy-cat reports of major "strangenesses" to occur once something suitably notable appears "on the web". There are numerous web discussions about these "phenomena". This 14 minute ...


1

Solution based on wind energy and cost aspects: Typical design range 10-20 m/s: Wind Turbines are designed to produce maximum power under somewhat above normal mean wind speeds such that overall energy output per total cost of ownership is maximised. This typically results in optimum operating velocities in the 10-20 m/s range. Wind Turbines already ...


1

While I'm not willing to spend the money to get access the paper, one issue jumps out at a casual reading of the abstract - turbine design. Honeste_vivere's answer mentions the possibility of destroying a farm, and the abstract includes "The reduction in wind speed due to large arrays increases the probability of survival of even present turbine designs." ...


1

I think you need to be careful here. The total power contained within a hurricane ranges from $1 \times 10^{12}$ to $6 \times 10^{14}$ Watts or 1 to 600 TW. The world energy consumption in 2008 was 20,279 TWh. There are 8760 hours/year, thus our consumption rate was ~2.31 TW (1 TW = $10^{12}$ W). The point being, the energy you would need to dissipate ...


7

The Wikipedia article refers to a fireball, but as Wikipedia itself explains the word fireball has many meanings and doesn't necessarily literally mean a fire as in the combustion of a material in oxygen. In this case it means a ball of very high temperature gas. The gas is heated by the impact and gets hot enough to emit light just like the gas heated in a ...


2

The space appearing black despite the abundance of stars is Olbers' paradox. Poet Edgar Allan Poe suggested that the finite size of the observable universe resolves the apparent paradox: because the universe is finitely old and the speed of light is finite, only finitely many stars can be observed within a given volume of space visible from ...


13

The reason the sky is blue on Earth is because of the Earth's atmosphere. The molecules and gas in the atmosphere interact with solar light via Rayleigh scattering, which allows for blue light to be scattered more efficiently than lower frequencies. This results in an abundance of blue light, which makes the sky look blue. Actually it should be said that ...


0

Clouds are the color of whatever wavelength of light strikes them. Before sunrise and after sunset, when the sky darkens but light comes from beyond the horizon, sunlight passes through a greater thickness of atmosphere than when it is shining straight down from above. When the Sun is directly overhead, Rayleigh scattering sorts out short-wavelength ...


0

I am here because of the bright spots on Ceres. It does not have the dense atmosphere of the Ionsphere, so I will quote you a reference on the phenomena of Reflection. This is covered by Philip M. Morse "Chpt 7 Hndbk of Physics Vibrations of Elastic Bodies; Wave propagation in Elastic Solids Sec 4. Reflection from a Plane Interface, Surface Waves" '(if the ...


3

As Dirk Bruere has pointed out, the mass of the earth's oceans is 1400/5 times the mass of the earth's atmosphere. If 1% of that mass is converted to vapor (and not immediately precipitated out), this implies a mass of water vapor 1400/500 times the mass of the atmosphere, or 2.8 times greater. Ignoring the slight change in gravitational attraction of the ...


0

Earth's atmosphere = 5 x 10^18 kg Earth's oceans = 1.4 x 10^21 kg So if 1% of the water became atmosphere the pressure would likely increase by about a factor of 3 or so. Probably not survivable given the temperature this would require


3

Physical things (solid, liquid, gas, plasma) both absorb and emit energy in the form of electromagnetic radiation of a wide range of frequencies. How fast they radiate and the strongest frequencies of radiation depend on the absolute temperature. How fast they absorb depends on the temperatures of objects around them. Therefore, the net intensity (energy per ...



Top 50 recent answers are included