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When you fix a reference point (take it to be the origin of your reference frame) you can write the position as $$\vec{r} = r \hat{r}$$ where $\hat{r}$ is the unit vector pointing toward the particle. Deriving you obtain $$\vec{v} = \frac{dr}{dt} \hat{r}+ r \frac{d \hat{r}}{dt}$$ The first term is the radial component of the velocity, the second one is ...


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I'm not an engineer, but this is how id do it. According to your rules, we can use a computer, and Audacity. You get a pair of headphones. You plug the headphones into the microphone jack on your computer. You open Audacity. You get a very small magnet. You glue the very small magnet to one of the fan blades. You turn the fan on. You hold one of the ...


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This is a problem that involves only calculation of velocities from other velocities, no influence (forces) needs to be considered. Imagine the system as it appears in the inertial system where the point of contact of the two wheels is at rest. Since the contact point is at rest, the mass points of both wheels that touch each other are at rest. Since any ...


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OK, I'm assuming you want the formal proof of this well known kinematics formula! So here goes: Let the particle rotate about the axis OO' ... Within time interval dt let its motion be represented by the vector dφ whose direction is along axis obeying right-hand-corkscrew rule, and whose magnitude is equal to the angle dφ. Now, if elementary displacement ...


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Assuming that this is a competition of some sort, and everyone has the same set of powertrain components (motor, batteries), then the best way to maximize the output of that powertrain is to characterize them and find the peak output in terms of torque at a given speed. It would be valuable to find this at a range of speeds starting from 0 so you can ...


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Think of a rotating disk. The disk is rotating on its center 1. Since the angular velocity, as you've mentioned, is the rate of change of angular position, then every point on the disk will experience the same angular velocity. If the disk change in shape as it rotate, then the angular velocity might not be the same anymore. 3. yes, you're right. since the ...


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1) Does this mean that for any particle on the rotating body the angular velocity is the same? On a rigid rotating body, yes, the angular velocity is the same for every point in that body. 2) Does this mean that when angular momentum is described, we are technically still describing a relationship between linear velocity and mass (mv), only now the ...


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However as seen by A , B remains at fixed distance and also doesn't rotate (relative angular velocity is zero). But it does rotate, if your reference frame does not rotate, but just gets centered on your point of interest. If you want to consider a rotating reference frame, then all points (that are fixed to the disc, or to the frame) are obviously ...



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