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What may be confusing you is that the passage you quote about the Space Shuttle is talking about speed relative to a fixed frame of reference: one fixed relative to the distant stars. On the other hand, when you think about aircraft flying through the air (or people walking along the ground), you think about a co-rotating frame of reference: fixed relative ...


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There is a slight effect on the lift requirement for an aircraft. A "stationary" object on the equator is actually traveling in a circle, at one earth-circumference per sidereal day velocity. That lessens its apparent weight because it is accelerating toward the center of the earth (centripetal acceleration). The effective gravitational constant (g minus ...


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Actually it's not like that when Earth is rotating all the objects in it's gravitational influence will also move with the same angular velocity $w$ so even if you are at certain height you are still stuck with your initial point but you can contradict it simply by using another external force which can cancel out your gravitational pull or you can go up to ...


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A modern airfoil is designed on the basis of the desired pressure distribution over the chord length of both sides. In some cases, only a single angle of attack is relevant while in others the airfoil must be a compromise of the pressure distributions over a range of angles and flap deflections. Two parameters can be used to tailor the desired pressure ...


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Let's start with an airplane making a circle level to the ground at a consant speed. Its position is given by $$\vec{x}_1(t) = r\begin{bmatrix} \cos(\omega t) \\ \sin(\omega t) \\ 0 \end{bmatrix}$$ where $r$ is the radius of the turn, $\omega$ is the angular velocity (i.e., $v/r$), and $t$ is time. The $x$- and $y$-coordinates are parallel to the ground and $...


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There are lots of answers on this site regarding "how is lift produced" etc. but this post asks about the determination of a typical wing profile, so it might be appropriate to follow through on that aspect. Determine the chord (length from wing leading edge to the trailing edge). Decide on your camber line, for a flat bottom surface wing, this is the ...



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