Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

You could think of this in terms equilibrium processes. The shower increases the partial pressure of water in air and that pushes the equilibrium of water condensing on the surface in the forward. There may also be some capillary action if the adsorbed water can form small liquid droplets. As more water seeps into the tissue the stress-strain properties of ...


0

The thrust a rocket can generate is proportional to the mass flow (thus $\frac{dm}{dt}$) and the velocity at which this mass leaves the rocket, often called the effective exhaust velocity, $v_e$. So the sum of all forces acting on the rocket, when also neglecting the fictitious Coriolis and centrifugal forces and assuming a pure vertical ascent, will be ...


0

Thinking through the problem for water vapour to exist by nature a fixed volume will contain more energy in the form of heat. The heat displaces air molecules around it making the volume lighter as in a hot air balloon. The amount of atoms in the fixed volume in comparison with surrounding air is higher in the water vapour. I see water vapour as heavier in ...


1

The air would be creating a high pressure in front of it and low pressure behind it, so the force would be pushing the door closed. If you were driving at highway speed backwards the door could be ripped off. To find out whether or not the force is enough to redirect the car, math is necessary. The drag force depends on surface area, airspeed, air density, ...


0

The pressure in the water at a certain level ($z$-coordinate) is everywhere the same. This implies that the pressure at the water surface outside the beaker, i.e. the atmospheric pressure $p_0$ has to be equal to the sum of the pressure created by the water column $\rho g h$ and the air pressure in the beaker $p_b$. $\rho$ is the density of the water, $g$ ...


0

Start off with beaker filled with water and completely submersed in the bath, with the beaker upside down (as in your schematic). Now, via some conduit, you introduce 10 ml of air into the beaker. Then move the beaker upwards until the water levels inside and outside of the beaker coincide exactly. The pressure of the air inside the beaker is now exactly the ...


1

I think this picture covers the gist of it. You need rubber or plastic, a mailable material that flattens when pressed against the object, but that wants to return to it's original shape when released. Think of, as part of measuring the weight of an object, you measure the pressure all around it. If you have more air pressure on the bottom than the ...


0

Suction cups work by having lower air pressure inside of the cup and more on the outside. The strength of a suction cup is dependent on both the difference in air pressure between the outside and inside of the cup and the area the cup covers, if the force applied to lift an object exceeds this amount then the cup will come free.


0

The idea gas law work; more specifically Boyle's law is a reciprocal law. Pressure and volume are inversely related. When you increase volume by a factor of 1.0666 (by 6.66%), you decrease pressure by $\frac{1}{1.0666}$. Pressure is inversely proportional to volume. $P \propto \frac{1}{V}$ So when you increase pressure by a certain factor, volume ...


0

The fins don't have moisture so no difference from evaporative cooling there. Air with higher humidity has a higher capacitance. As humid air passes from the front the back it will adsorb the same amount of heat and temperature at the trailing edge will be lower than the dry air. So humid air will maintain a greater temperature difference which results ...


0

In addition to having more heat capacity than dry air, humid air will deposit water molecules on the surface of the ice cream in the form of condensation. Upon contact with the cold ice cream, the condensing moisture releases latent energy, the energy of vaporization that originally was required to create humidity from water. Each water molecule that ...


0

Both turbines and motors can be used to turn an electric generator which produces electric power. I will exclude electric motors for this short overview. Both turbine and motor work on an operating fluid, the so-called working fluid. A turbine is continuously operating on the fluid, while a motor operates intermittently in strokes. Most modern cars use ...


0

For the case of the nuclear generating plant, the difference between a motor and a turbine is a bit more subtle. In the nuclear generating plant, high pressure steam is generated by the heat of the nuclear reaction, and this high pressure steam is sent to a turbine. The turbine is connected via a shaft to a generator (which in some cases, can be a motor ...


0

I see where you're trying to get to. So let me just jump right in with the textbook nomenclature. You are interested in the distinction between a device doing work versus having work done on it. What you might not have realized is that a turbine and a motor are in two completely different families. Let me lay out the distinctions here: A pump does work, ...


2

A turbine is machine in which the kinetic energy of a moving fluid is converted to mechanical power by the impulse or reaction of the fluid with a series of buckets, paddles, or blades arrayed about the circumference of a wheel or cylinder. The mechanical power typically has the form of a torque on a rotating axis. A motor is generic term for a machine ...


1

Assuming that the pressure change across the cone is small (e.g., no significant density changes for the flowing gas), use the continuity equation. With constant density, this simplifies to $A_1 \cdot v_1 = A_2 \cdot v_2$, where $A$ is the cross sectional area of the flow stream and $v$ is the velocity of the flow stream. If you additionally need the ...


0

This is actually not a completely settled question, so don't feel too bad if you don't understand it in every detail! It's also possible that the cause is not the same in all situations, and be aware that my explanation is not universally accepted, but here's my interpretation: There are actually two interacting phenomena going on: the formation of the ...


0

So the vortex street appears as the stream goes faster and faster: the stream obeys Newton's laws, "objects in motion tend to stay in motion unless acted on by a net force." The force that keeps the stream laminar around the cylinder is fluid pressure formed by the viscous forces of the fluid, which means there is a pressure gradient and a region of low ...



Top 50 recent answers are included