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There are two reasons why the bottom hole puts out more water. 1, it is exposed for a longer period of time than the two holes above it, add, 2, the velocity of the water coming from the lowest hole in greater than the other two holes above it. See formula below: V = sq. root of 2gh where: V = velocity in ft/s g = accel const. 32.2 ft/ s^2 h = height of ...


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This has nothing to do with air pressure since the air pressure is exactly the same at all of the holes (including the top one). Regarding pressure only differences can cause stuff to move, the absolute pressure is only relevant for density and such. The concept you should read more about is called hydrostatic pressure and given by a very simple formula. ...


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Simplify the equation to make it more convenient to you by using the definition of a mole. A mole , generally denoted by 'n' is the mass of the substance taken divided my its molecular weight. On solving the only unknown in this equation , you get the mass of air contained in the volume you obtained. Now , you can just plug in this value into the definition ...


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The ideal gas law says you something about $p$, $V$ and $T$ in terms of the number of particles. That's nice, because it holds approximately for all gases. For a given $p$ and $T$ you know the number per volume - it is independent of the type of gas! Then why is the density of gases different? - because the mass per particle is different. So now you have to ...


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Your mistake: the volume is not 207 times greater. This would be only true for constant temperature; so it's no wonder if you get constant temperature :) The volume increases more than this. It is governed by the laws for adiabatic expansion. See wikipedia. The relevant equation is $$T^\kappa p^{1-\kappa} = const.$$ Here $\kappa$ is a parameter of the ...


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Keep in mind that pressure is not force. Also, pressure is not mass per area. Pressure expresses the ratio of differential force exerted normal to a surface per differential area, and is expressed in units of force per area. A pressure of 100 kPa exerted on a surface means that on 1 cm$^2$ of that surface there is a total force of 10 N normal to the ...


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Yes, the increased air density in winter will increase drag and thus fuel consumption, especially on the highway. The density is increased by even more than the 10% you propose, since the air is usually drier in the winter than in the summer, and dry air is denser than wet air (because the molar mass of N2 is much greater than that of H20). Also, the ...


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I think you are right about the 10% increase air density in the winter and this thorough answer on the Bicycle Stack Exchange supports your observation about the effect when cycling. Drag forces are directly proportional to air density so that would have an effect on fuel consumption. There is another factor this is also significant - in regions where ...


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You said "at constant pressure." I think you mean without wind, correct? (Because you also mentioned wind.) Just so there won't be confusion let's remove wind from the equation and assume the air is completely motionless at colder temperatures. Air molecules condense or shrink in cooler temperatures - causing higher pressure. So yes, cooler ...


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Shouldn't the concentration of nitrogen increase with higher altitudes since nitrogen has a lower density than oxygen? No, it shouldn't, at least not up to 100 km or so. Look at your graph, which shows that even argon is well-mixed throughout the lower atmosphere (the troposphere, stratosphere, and mesosphere). Argon atoms are considerably more massive ...



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