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22

You don't. You actually hear the high frequency notes from headphones. The bass really doesn't travel at all well, but the attack noise from the drum or bass guitar is what leaks from headphones. This is why on the tube you hear "tsss tsss tsss tsss" and very little else. From @leftaroundabout's answer on the post that valerio92 linked: Normal ...


6

My high school physics teacher was saying that “this is because of interference of sound waves. During the day, there are a lot of sounds and they cancel each other due to interference. But, during the night, there are few sounds and they can reach to our ears without canceling each other”. You need a better high school physics teacher. Temperatures tend ...


5

Any physical phenomenon is potentially capable to cause some change to any other phenomenon, more or less directly. If it was not the case, the physical world could be divided into completely independent realms; there would not be the one single world we call Nature. Practically though, many if not most of the actually existing interactions between systems ...


5

I can answer half your question in that a sound can change the path of light. A change in the density of the air produces a change in the refractive index of the air and so a Schlieren photograph can make this visible. Here is a YouTube video to show a sound wave produced by clapping.


4

The effect you noticed is a function of strength and size. When you have a large window, and a sonic boom comes along, a relatively small pressure difference can set up very large tensile forces in the surface of the glass (especially if the shock wave cannot easily "go around the back" of the glass). When there is a bending stress, all you need is a small ...


3

To a very rough approximation we can say that frequencies of speech are selected by standing waves in the speakers mouth, larynx etc. If they breath helium the speed of these standing waves increases but their wave length, being constrained by dimensions of their body, remains the same. This results in higher frequency sounds produced. (think $f=v/\lambda$...


3

I would tend to agree that background noise is a factor, but rather than reducing, adding to the sound you are trying to make sense of. So part of that may be how your brain is able to filter the information from the background noise. But at night the temperature is lower and according to this tutorial on sound propagation (which does cite reliable ...


2

Yes, sound waves in a gas, liquid or solid can affect the light passing through it, as the motion of the atoms due to sound waves changes the atomic spacing, and this changes the index of refraction slightly. So the light would be diffracted and some amount of the light would experience a frequency shift up and a frequency shift down by the sound wave ...


2

Keep in mind that frequency is both the wave property that is preserved in a change of medium (both wavelength and velocity change) and the physical property of sound waves that we experience as pitch. So the frequencies you hear in both cases are ones produced by the vocal cords. Nor do we expect the gas environment of the vocal cords to have a large ...


2

The exercise seems not too difficult. With $f_0 = 456 \text{Hz}$, $c$ the speed of sound an $v$ the speed of the observer, you just have to find the beat frequency by adding the wave equations for 2 different sound waves with frequencies $f_1=f_0(1-\frac{v}{c})$ and $f_2=f_0(1+\frac{v}{c})$. So this is just an exercise in applying the Doppler effect, and you ...


2

Higher frequencies are attenuated (absorbed) more strongly than lower frequencies. Here are a couple of attenuation values from this table of sound-wave attenuation (90% relative humidity): f (kHz) a (dB/km) 1 5.3 2 9 4 20 8 63 The discharge itself will generate a wide spectrum of frequencies, from infrasonic all the way ...


1

Difference between real and absolute value in general: Look at count_to_10 's answer. For acoustics and preasure measurement: Absolute pressure - pressure against perfect vacuum. Real pressure: Usually defined as the pressure against a reference-environment. Also called differential pressure. For example the pressure of the air inside a football against the ...


1

I am going to steal from an answer to another question. ... a variety of sounds are heard following a lightning strike is not due to dispersion, but rather the multiple branches of the pre-strike, the main strike, and the extended distances covered by the lightning, plus, sometimes, echos. ... In the quote there is a link to a page where they ...


1

Based on some experience in music, I realized that the relation of the frequency of two pitches with equal steps say from C to D (whole step) or D to E (same whole step) is $f_2 = af_1$, where $f_2$ is the higher pitch, and $f_1$ is the lower, and $a$ depends only on the distance of steps from the lower to higher pitch. This means that the frequency ...


1

Yes. Let's consider the phase shifts to be random. Then we can consider each amplitude to be an independent random variable $A_i(t)$. Each one has a variance of $$\text{var}(A_i) = \langle A_i^2 \rangle - \langle A_i \rangle^2 = \langle A_i^2 \rangle \propto I_i$$ because the average amplitude should be zero, and intensity is proportional to amplitude ...


1

I remember working this out in the opposite direction, hoping to get a paradox: that the amplitude of the sound produced by a choir of 100 singers is only 10 times the amplitude of the sounds produced by one of them. Each individual sound can be represented as a vector in 2-dimensional space, with length 1 (since all are equally loud) and random phase. The ...


1

The most obvious answer is you measure the total sound energy that you released and is carried away with the sound and the unit is Joule. However, this does depend on intensity, the higher the intensity, the more energy per second and the more energy/sound is released in the 10 minutes. If you want your measurement to be independent of the intensity, you ...


1

Assume that the sound you are interested in is heard at 1000 Hz in air, where the sound is traveling at 343 m/s. If the device generating the sound (some type of waterproof speaker) is placed underwater, it will still generate a 1000 Hz sound, because the frequency is determined by the device that generates the sound, not by the speed of the sound in a ...


1

Electromagnetic waves are produced by oscillating charged particles but they do not need other particles to propagate. Indeed electromagnetic waves are solutions of the Maxwell equations with no sources, i.e. in the vacuum. On the other hand, mechanical waves need an elastic medium to propagate, regardless of being transverse, longitudinal or mixed waves. ...


1

Yes, the two approaches are equivalent. As you've noted, there's only one physical effect going on here, interference, and the standard beat frequency / path length interference formulas are just special cases of the same thing. There are some restrictions. Both beat frequency and path length interference only make physical sense when the sources are ...



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