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7

It can be done, but there's some trade offs. Larger speakers are better at moving longer wavelength (low frequency) waves. When you try to combine a bunch of small surfaces in different locations to recreate a single wave you end up with a some random interference where the wave is stronger or weaker (in 3d-space) (see phased-array antenna for some ...


4

This is a neat question. Did you know that adding two Sine waves of the same frequency but different phase together always produces another Sine wave? Of course you can imagine two perfectly out-of-phase Sine waves that "cancel" by adding to a line but in that case you can just imagine the result as a Sine wave with 0 amplitude. Using gnuplot with the ...


4

Actually I have read (although I can't find a reference) that the subjectively perceived psychological notion of pitch itself, although very nearly wholly set by the sound wave's frequencies, is also weakly dependent on the intensity of the sound: that is, a higher intensity sound wave does seem ever so slightly sharper (higher in subjective pitch) than one ...


4

Taste and smell are mediated by receptors in your body that molecules can attach to. These receptors then give off an electrical signal which is translated in the brain to a certain taste or smell. The details of this are biological and not of importance here. So no, there is no relevant frequency or even wave-like behavior. Touch is a very different thing. ...


3

Taste: There are 5 basic tastes that the human tongue can detect. They are sweet, savory, salty, sour and bitter. These are detected by taste receptor cells on our tongue, I won't go deep into the biology part. The basic tastes of sweet, salty and sour have different thresholds, or concentration levels, at which they can be detected. In other words, it is ...


3

Well, does playing flute-like across the top of a beer bottle count? Or, better put: a jug-player in a country "Jug band" plays his instrument that way. It's also your call whether blocked instruments with holes along the length qualify, such as an ocarina. I sort of guess what you're looking for is an instrument with an air pocket as the resonance, as ...


2

Let me give a more detailed back-of-the-envelope approximation, which might actually be able to decide, given the conditions of the problem, if we would be able to hear the sound of Sun. Assumptions: The space between Earth and Sun is filled with uniform air. This is a non-physical assumption. It basically means we are ignoring the gravitational effects ...


2

The surface of the sun is where local plasma cools enough to recombine and go transparent, the photosphere. You would still be deep within the sun's atmosphere, and it would be LOUD. H-bombs are LOUD at the edge of their fireballs.


2

Chris White's answer using an analogy to incoherent light pretty much answers the question; it's fundamentally a question of the statistics of how wave sources add. Here's a slightly different but equivalent rephrasing of Chris White's answer using matrices: Given $N$ wave sources, incoherent waves add "diagonally" ($I\propto N)$, ie, additively. ...


2

The Doppler shift for small speeds is $\Delta f/f = \Delta v/c$, where $\Delta v$ is the (signed) speed of the source relative to the detector, and I'm using $c$ as the speed of sound. So let's plug in some numbers. I'm going to use numbers that will produce a large effect to see how larger an effect is plausible. Let's take a woofer operating at $f = 200 ...


1

Based off of that video, the differences you're pointing out are the nice wavefronts from the speaker at 2:04 and then the clap shown at the beginning and the end. It's true that the wave fronts from the speaker (and even the book) give nice "crests" and "troughs" whereas the clap kinda just... is this blob-y thing. There are several potential reasons why ...


1

Sound as you hear it is waves of pressure differences in the air, which is interpreted by your ear as sound. So no, you cannot directly hear electromagnetic radiation (EMR). You could, however, take the EMR and convert it into sound waves in the audible range, which you could listen to. This was done in 1990 for Jupiter by Voyager as it passed Jupiter. It ...


1

It was already mentioned by Carl Witthoft, but I think the ocarina does count, as long as you're not too hung up on the resonance chamber being a tube as such. From Wikipedia: The ocarina, unlike other vessel flutes, has the unusual quality of not relying on the pipe length to produce a particular tone. Instead the tone is dependent on the ratio of the ...


1

You don't explicitly state you are looking for a wind instrument so perhaps a drum would count. Perhaps a snare drum since the snare is on the resonant (non-struck) head or a kettle drum maybe qualifies as a pitched instrument. If you are looking for a wind instrument in particular and Carl Witthoft's suggestions of the ocarina or the jug do not fit the ...


1

The maximum level before the eardrum break is 140 dB @ 1000 Hz, because sound wave generate vibrations at the tympanic membrane , at 140 dB the displacement of the membrane its so high that it begins to rip of from the tympanic muscles. The minimum level that the human ear can perceive is 0 dB @ 1000 Hz, thats is the equivalent to 2x10-5 N/m2. You also ...


1

At low Renyolds number, the vortex shedding described in the question does not occur, based upon the following simulation videos: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ElmTA0t3bEc http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8o-JC3R9YBY http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sN9LP5dNWhc However, for higher Renyolds number see Nakamura et al. "Experiments on vortex shedding from flat ...


1

Another thing that happens that can lead you to think that low frequency sounds attenuate quicker is that if you record yourself one time being close to the microphone and another time being farther away, you'll notice that the farther you are the more the lowest frequencies are picked up. This is due to the proximity effect and not to the low frequency ...



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