3
votes
1answer
81 views

How does one make a particle with particular wavefunction?

I was always curious how scientists achieve a particle with particular wavefunction (of location and spins etc.) So how do they achieve it? Or is this impossible?
0
votes
0answers
100 views

Counterpart of the Klein Gordon Equation on the “Coordinate Shell”

The relation $$\psi=Ce^{i/\hbar(Et-\mathbf{p}\cdot\mathbf{x})}\tag{1}$$ satisfies the Klein Gordon equation on the mass shell, i.e. for $E^2=p^2+m^2$. Now let's think in the reverse direction. ...
13
votes
4answers
2k views

Is there a deep reason why springs combine like capacitors?

I was solving a practice Physics GRE and there was a question about springs connected in series and parallel. I was too lazy to derive the way the spring constants add in each case. But I knew how ...
1
vote
1answer
156 views

Relating theta_QCD to neutron EDM

How do I relate the topological $\theta_\text{QCD}$ parameter to the electric dipole moment (EDM) of the neutron? I am very familiar with chiral perturbation theory. I just need to know how to take ...
9
votes
2answers
545 views

Was Jupiter's mass “guessed at” by Kepler or Galileo?

Following Kepler's publication of his 3rd law of planetary motion1, $$p^2 / r^3 = 1$$ in 1619, it would have been possible to use telescopic observations to arrive at an estimate of the orbital ...
5
votes
2answers
310 views

Conservation Laws in Photon Parametric Down-Conversion

As Wikipedia explains, one photon passing through a crystal sometimes down-converts to two photons. Wikipedia says total energy and momentum are conserved by just considering the three photon states; ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

Why does it take until the middle of summer before lakes have warm water, but desert sand heats up in hours?

My sister asked me this question and I keep thinking that water would conduct heat much faster than sand. Hence the energy transfer of heat across the lake does not allow it to heat up soon. Sand on ...
1
vote
1answer
111 views

Complex part of the solution for physical values

What's a physical meaning of, for example, complex part of the solution for coordinate change of the anharmonic oscillator? Why after substitute (for diff. equation solve) for real x we can earn $x = ...
0
votes
3answers
271 views

Classical mechanics. One-dimensional motion

Here is one task below. How to solve equation $$ m\ddot {x} + ax = F(t), x(0) = \dot x (0) = 0 $$ in quadratures by using two methods? I tried to create a system of equations $$ \begin{matrix} \dot ...
1
vote
2answers
713 views

Is the letter delta generally only used to express change in variable or quantity?

I was speaking with a friend of mine earlier and he said "Oh look, delta, the sign of uncertainty" (he doesn't study physics often so had only seen in in Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle equations). ...
-1
votes
2answers
804 views

Quantum Mechanics and nuclear fusion

I've been told that, according to QM, when Hydrogen atoms are left together there is a non-zero probability that they spontaneously fuse (I accept this bit). I've been told further that, because of ...
3
votes
1answer
350 views

Why do hydrogen atoms attract?

That is, why is the potential energy with the orbitals overlapping less than with the Hydrogen atoms 'independent'. Similarly, why is a noble gas configuration stabler than if an electron were to be ...
0
votes
5answers
347 views

How do you calculate the time to emission of an electron from a metal given the incident radiation?

Here's the question: A monochromatic point source of light radiates 25 W at a wavelength of 5000 angstroms. A plate of metal is placed 100 cm from the source. Atoms in the metal have a radius of 1 ...
1
vote
2answers
315 views

Why are atoms particles?

The Oxford English Dictionary definition of particle is as follows: "A component of the physical world smaller than the atom." I read an article in NewScientist and it said "...all particles from ...
3
votes
1answer
155 views

Why is the $\langle v_{x}^{2} \rangle=\frac{1}{3} \langle v^2 \rangle$?

For a randomly moving particle. Or, I suppose that 1/3 could generalise to 1/n, where n is the non rotational degrees of freedom for that particle. Related reference Kinetic Theory of Gasses.
1
vote
3answers
160 views

Discarded by Relativity [closed]

Both the General & Special Relativity discarded Newtonian mechanics of absoluteness. According to Einstein's view, Time, Mass, Length and Space are interdependent. So, Did Relativity discarded ...
1
vote
1answer
605 views

Does Heisenberg's energy-time uncertainty principle imply that quantum computing is no more efficient than classical computing?

See http://arxiv.org/abs/quant-ph/0006080v1 "On Non Efficiency of Quantum Computer", by Robert Alicki. In this paper, the author argues using Heisenberg's energy-time uncertainty principle, that ...
2
votes
0answers
60 views

Beginning with an arbitrary classical equation for energy, how do I get the QM Hamiltonian?

For linear momentum I can use the de Broglie equation, but what about energy in terms of moment of inertia or some other form?
0
votes
1answer
157 views

Making or Demonstrating Principle of Electron Microscope

is it possible to either demonstrate the principle or make a SEM ( electron microscope ) at home or lab as an enthusiast?? and how can i start?
3
votes
2answers
174 views

Increased mass from signals traveling close to the speed of light

As you travel close to the speed of light, it is to my understanding you gain mass. Does this also apply when the brain sends electrical signals to the muscles? Do the signals (that are traveling at ...
1
vote
3answers
631 views

The vacuum light speed: Is it really constant, i.e., independent of location in space-time?

I am by no means an expert in this field, however something puzzles me about the speed of light and the relativity of time and space (space-time). Is is universally acknowledged that the speed of ...
2
votes
3answers
198 views

Heat Equation Equalities

While studying the heat equation, I ran into a few equalities that I cannot understand. For example, Fourier's law of heat conduction claims that $$\varphi(x,t)=-K_0\frac{\partial u}{\partial x},$$ ...
-2
votes
2answers
2k views

How to add two perpendicular 2D vectors [closed]

vector D = 4 cm North vector J = 4.5 cm West what is D+J? In a more general sense, how can two 2D vectors that are perpendicular to each other be added?
3
votes
2answers
137 views

is there spin degree in 1D

it is well known that the intrisic spin is closely related to the rotation in space. However, in 1d , it is impossible to define rotation, therefore it is meaningless to talk about spin in 1d.However, ...
4
votes
1answer
839 views

Is there a relation between quantum theory and Fourier analysis?

These days I was studying the quantum theory.I found that some theories about that is similar to Fourier Transform theory.For instance, it says "A finite-time light's frequency can't be a certain ...
5
votes
1answer
545 views

Lagrangian density for a Piano String

So I'm trying to do this problem where I'm given the Lagrangian density for a piano string which can vibrate both transversely and longitudinally. $\eta(x,t)$ is the transverse displacement and ...
1
vote
2answers
145 views

Has anyone ever actually compared the weight of a heavily loaded centrifuge when it is spinning and not spinning?

I have searched the internet and have not found any actual test results.
2
votes
0answers
366 views

include the stretch of the spring own weight in potential energy for spring pendulum?

we are given a problem with spring with its own mass $m$. I am confused how to set up the PE term in the Lagrangian. Assume the spring has length of $L_{0}$ when it is laying on a table horizontally. ...
2
votes
2answers
202 views

Is there a Transparent, Non-Magnetic Conductor?

I am looking for a transparent (visual wavelength: 390 to 750 nm), non-magnetic (not attracted by a magnet) electrical conductor that could be used for a physics demonstration. Is there such a ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

Stationary Solutions

An unbelievably basic question, but it's something I've never been taught. Am I right in thinking that the following defines a stationary solution? Let $\phi$ be some dynamical variable satisfying a ...
4
votes
2answers
624 views

What is an intuitive picture of the motion of nucleons?

I understand the "motion" of electrons within an ordinary atom (say argon at room temperature and pressure). They are moving in "orbits" defined by quantum mechanical wavefunctions where the "orbits" ...
0
votes
1answer
134 views

What are the Electric and Magnetic Properties of Aluminum Oxynitride?

Is Transparent Aluminum (Aluminum Oxynitride) a good conductor of electricity? Also, is it attracted by a magnet?
1
vote
3answers
9k views

Average power dissipated by a resistor on AC current

So let's say we have an AC current of 120 V at 60 Hz. Then i's waveform would be $$f(t) = 120 \sqrt{2} \cos(2 \pi 60 t)$$ Or rather the amplitude times $\sqrt{2}$ times $\cos(2 \pi ...
6
votes
3answers
1k views

What should a physics undergrad aspiring to be a string theorist learn before grad school?

The question I guess is pretty clear. I am a physics undergrad wishing to pursue research in quantum gravity(string theory?). What are the subjects I should learn other than the usual compulsory ...
1
vote
1answer
258 views

Fields of Steady Currents Using Electrostatics

Suppose you have a uniform ring charge rotating at constant angular velocity so that you also have a uniform ring of steady current, and thus you can use the Biot-Savart Law to compute the magnetic ...
1
vote
1answer
321 views

Improved energy-momentum tensor

While still dealing with this issue, I've stumbled upon this answer to a question asking about the conserved quantity corresponding to a scaling transformation. It mentions that in accordance with ...
8
votes
3answers
1k views

Why does inverting a song have no influence?

I inverted the waveform of a given song and was wondering what will happen. The result is that it sounds the exact same way as before. I used Audacity and doublechecked if the wave-form really is ...
1
vote
1answer
229 views

classical dynamics on group manifold SU(2)

I am trying to understand how to formulate classical dynamics on group manifold SU(2). This will be an exercise for me to the more advanced subject of path integral on group manifold. Does someone ...
2
votes
2answers
779 views

Force applied perpendicular to direction of motion, static or kinetic friction?

Let's assume we have a 1 kg cube on a flat uniform surface. The coefficients of friction between them are $\mu_k = 0.25$ and $\mu_s = 0.50$. This cube is moving at 1 m/s in the y direction, with ...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Direction of friction on particle placed on a rotating turntable

If a particle is placed on a rotating turntable then the particle has a tendency to slip tangentially with respect to the underneath surface... So the friction should act tangentially to the ...
58
votes
10answers
8k views

Is time continuous or discrete?

While working on physics simulation software, I noticed that I had implemented discrete time (the only type possible on computers). By that I mean that I had an update mechanism that advanced the ...
4
votes
1answer
803 views

representation of SU(2)

The question is regarding SU(2) group and SU(2) algebra. The SU(2) group can be generated by exponentiating the generators of SU(2) algebra $X_a$ as $exp(i t_a X_a )$ with $t_a$ being three ...
2
votes
2answers
184 views

How is an ideal mirrored box of photons distinguishable from massive particles?

Suppose you have an ideal mirrored box that contains enough photons as to have a relativistic mass equivalent to the [rest mass + kinetic energy] of an electron. In other words, the two systems have ...
1
vote
1answer
511 views

How does Doppler effect differ between EM -waves in Electrodynamics and Sound -waves?

I have an electrodynamics -course that contains doupler -effect but unfortunately with little explanations. Is it the same thing as the classical doppler effect for example with sound, more here, or ...
6
votes
3answers
177 views

why nontrivially space-like connected event horizons do not respect unitarity?

I want to understand the assertion that the gluing between distant event horizons is forbidden by unitarity. What is exactly the argument that unitarity will necessarily forbid topological nontrivial ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

Is there a difference between a postulate and a principle in physics?

Is there a difference between a postulate and a principle in physics? Both seem unproved statements taken as true. If thats correct, why the different names?
13
votes
2answers
591 views

How can we define BF theory on a general 4-manifold?

(I have rewritten the question some, with new understanding) 4d BF theory is classically presented as the TFT arising from the Lagrangian $B\wedge F$, where $B$ is an abelian 2-connection (locally ...
0
votes
1answer
527 views

Inductance of loop to a square wire? What is the induced current and the induced $\bar E$?

I am practising for the elementary-physics -course Tfy-0.1064, this puzzle is a simplified version of the problem 3A here (sorry not in English). My basic idea here is to understand a scenario with ...
-1
votes
2answers
172 views

A large rock falls on your toe. Which concept is most important in determining how much it hurts?

A) The mass of the rock B) The weight of the rock C) Both the mass and the weight are important. D) Either the mass or the weight, as they are related by a single multiplicative constant, g. ...
-1
votes
2answers
482 views

Mass vs. weight on a spring-loaded bathroom scale

You stand on a spring-loaded bathroom scale in a bathroom. The scale "reads" your mass. What is the scale actually measuring? Similarly, you stand on a spring-loaded bathroom scale in an elevator ...

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