2
votes
2answers
767 views

What would happen to a person that was inside the Large Hadron Collider when it is turned on? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: What would happen if you put your hand in front of the 7 TeV beam at LHC? Not a terribly scientific question, but one that I'm sure many people have thought about :)
2
votes
1answer
83 views

Why does $H_2$ form on such a long time scale?

If we were trying to figure out the time scale for a gas-phase reaction between two hydrogen atoms in a molecular cloud (which has density $~10^4/$cm$^3$), apparently the reaction would happen on a ...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the relativistic particle in a box?

I know people try to solve Dirac equation in a box. Some claim it cannot be done. Some claim that they had found the solution, I have seen three and they are all different and bizarre. But my main ...
0
votes
2answers
12k views

What is the characteristic length of a cylinder

I have a cold cylinder that is submerged in hot water and I need to find the convective heat transfer coefficient. I can do the whole process but I am stuck finding the characteristic length. I found ...
3
votes
2answers
166 views

Simulating a proton

How much computing power would it take to simulate a single proton from the bottom up, without taking any shortcuts whatsoever? My current understanding is that: A proton is basically a seething ...
3
votes
1answer
48 views

Are there any electro-optic crystals that are also pyroelectric but not birefringent?

As the title says, a crystal that is electr-optic and pyroelectric can it be non-birefrigent?
1
vote
0answers
289 views

Photon Statistics of a Coherent Gaussian Beam [closed]

Assume that a 100 pW He-Ne single-mode last emits light at 633 nm in a TEM00 Gaussian beam. (a)What is the mean number of photons crossing a circle of radius equal to the waist radius of the beam ...
3
votes
2answers
579 views

Thomas-Fermi approximation and the dielectric function (+ small bit on graphene)

1) With the dielectric function, which is a function of wavenumber and frequency,how is it possible to take the limit of either to zero without changing the other one? I thought that frequency and ...
1
vote
1answer
375 views

Where did Karl Schwarzschild derived his solution?

Does anyone know more about circumstances of Karl Schwarzschild at the Russian front in 1915 where he allegedly derived his famous solution of the Einstein equations (describing a black hole)? Sources ...
3
votes
3answers
249 views

Does the equivalence principle mean that the Earth is expanding?

Popular books suggest that for an observer in the Einstein lift the following situations are equivalent: 1, the lift hangs motionless (relative to the Earth) on a cable in the gravitational field of ...
0
votes
1answer
177 views

(Earth's) magnetic field

Always when we want to represent the magnetic field of the earth we see a similar image: My question is, what exactly does this show? What are the blue and orange lines, what do they represent? Why ...
2
votes
1answer
707 views

Minimal coupling of an atom to the EM field

The Hamiltonian of an atom coupled to an EM field, both described quantum mechanically is: $$H = \frac{1}{2m}(\hat{p}-q\hat{A})^2 = \frac{\hat{p}^2}{2m} ...
3
votes
0answers
262 views

What is the Landé g factor?

What is the Landé g factor? I know that it gives the relation between magnetic moment and angular moment, but i wanted to know why are those magnitudes related to each other and why is the magnetic ...
0
votes
1answer
895 views

What is the linear momentum of an inelastic and elastic collision?

The arrows in the figure represent the linear momentum of two balls before they collide. If the collision is perfectly inelastic, find the linear momentum after the collision. If the collision is ...
1
vote
3answers
3k views

If something weighs 25 kg, how do I find the mass of the object?

An object is falling and it weighs 25 kg (on a scale, presumably). What is its mass? I know that weight is measured in Newtons and mass in kilograms, but what if a problem states that something ...
3
votes
3answers
565 views

How to compute the expectation value $\langle x^2 \rangle$ in quantum mechanics?

$$\langle x^2 \rangle = \int_{-\infty}^\infty x^2 |\psi(x)|^2 \text d x$$ What is the meaning of $|\psi(x)|^2$? Does that just mean one has to multiply the wave function with itself?
1
vote
2answers
3k views

What does the velocity of a wave mean?

I know that the velocity of a wave is given by $v=\lambda f$ but what does this velocity represent in the physical sense. For instance, if I am told a car moves at a velocity of 5 $m/s$ I know that ...
3
votes
1answer
698 views

Limit of Fermi-Dirac distribution as $T$ goes to zero

Hopefully this is a simple question, I just can't seem to get my mind around it. I'm to take the limit of the Fermi-Dirac distribution for $T \rightarrow 0$. In this limit the chemical potential is ...
3
votes
2answers
216 views

Many faces of linear response theory

I have seen two forms of linear response: One is in the calculation of susceptibilities using Green functions. The other is in the evaluation of response currents, say, London current of a ...
10
votes
2answers
1k views

The physics community's take on noncommutative geometry

Connes's noncommutative geometry program includes an approach to the Standard Model that employs a noncommutative extension of Riemannian metric. In recent years I've heard physicists say that this ...
1
vote
0answers
99 views

Kinematics algebra, pT, Peskin Eq.17.59

my question concerns the kinematics of 2 to 2 particle scattering. I refer to Peskin and Schroeder eq.17.59 going from this expression ...
0
votes
0answers
152 views

Angle of Inclination

How do I calculate the angle of Inclination for a specific location on the Earth? The only Information I've got is the longitude and latitude in degree, so I do not understand. I now ...
3
votes
1answer
249 views

What are the properties and characteristics of a single Quantum?

In Quantum mechanics , a quantum of energy called Quanta is origin of everything. In physics, a quantum (plural: quanta) is the minimum amount of any physical entity involved in an interaction. ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Wave function of Hydrogen Atom [closed]

Wavefunction of a Hydrogen atom is expressed in eigenfunctions as: $$\psi(\boldsymbol r,t=0)=1/\sqrt{14}(2\psi_{100}(\boldsymbol r)-3\psi_{200}(\boldsymbol r)+\psi_{322}(\boldsymbol r) ).$$ Is ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

Poynting vector of a wire between capacitors

A capacitor made of two circular plates of radius $L$ separated by $d$, initially the plates carry $\pm$ Q charge. Then a wire of resistance R is placed between them, how do I go about deriving a ...
0
votes
0answers
257 views

The Deflecting System in a Hot Cathode Ray Tube

In an HCR-Tube, the deflecting system used to deviate the electron beam is made of positively charged plates. How is this justified? If, due to some malfunction, the electron beam deflects from its ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

What are Wightman fields/functions

Simple question: What are Wightman fields? What are Wightman functions? What are their uses? For example can I use them in operator product expansions? How about in scattering theory?
-2
votes
1answer
516 views

How to reconstruct information from a graph of an oscillation? [closed]

We are given a graph of the position of a wave (amplitude). How can we calculate the wavelength, frequency and the maximum speed of a particle attached to that wave? We have Speed = wave length ...
2
votes
3answers
828 views

Difference in velocity of light in change in medium [duplicate]

It is often seen that according to physics the light changes it's velocity according to the medium through which it is traveling. So can it be explained that why so happen?
5
votes
4answers
366 views

Are a quantum mechanical system a chaotic (yet deterministic) system?

The title is slightly misleading. I really want to know if the randomness and probabilities observed in quantum mechanics is really just the result of a chaotic (yet deterministic) system. If it is ...
8
votes
5answers
939 views

The role of representation theory in QM/QFT?

I need help understanding the role of representation theory in QM/QFT. My understanding of representation theory in this context is as follows: there are physical symmetries of the system we are ...
5
votes
3answers
408 views

Takhatajan's mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics

So I began skimming L. Takhatajan's Quantum Mechanics For Mathematicians, and saw the mathematical formulation of QM that he uses (page 51). (The PDF file is available here.) I've only taken a basic ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Bernoulli's equation and reference frames

So I was thinking about this while driving home the other day. I've never been quite clear on why when you drive with the windows down air rushes into your car. I thought this might be explained by ...
2
votes
1answer
168 views

Definition of scattered particle?

Compare the number of scattered particles: $N_s=Fa\int\sigma(\theta)d\Omega$ With the total number of incident particles: $N_{in}=Fa$ Here, F is the flux of incoming beam, a the area. sigma the ...
9
votes
3answers
773 views

If superposition is possible in QM, why do we often assume systems are already in their eigenstates?

My understanding is that an arbitrary quantum-mechanical wavefunction can be written as a linear combination of eigenfunctions of some Hermitian operator, most commonly the Hamiltonian; when a ...
3
votes
1answer
67 views

The synthesis of $^{254}\text{No}$

How is $^{254}\text{No}$ synthesised? Could you explain the reaction where it is preceded by $^{208}\text{Pb}(^{48}\text{Ca}, 2\text{n})$? References to articles are well enough—I was somehow unable ...
2
votes
2answers
187 views

SI units with more than one prefix in fractions

Is it (in the view of SI) correct to note units with more then one prefix? I discuss this since several months with friends, but we could not find a proper source for our statements yet. Examples for ...
2
votes
1answer
144 views

Flat poster on a wall gaining curvature over time

Assuming you have a flat poster with no curvature, why is it that when you pin it to the wall (with thumbtacks) it gains curvature as seen in the picture below. When I put the poster up it was ...
2
votes
3answers
659 views

Find Inductance in a Coil

Question: An inductive coil has an internal resistance of 20 $\Omega$. When an AC Voltage source with a frequency of 100 Hz is connected to the coil, the current lags the voltage by 30 degrees. What ...
2
votes
1answer
195 views

What is the weakest magnetic field that can practically be measured?

I would like to be able to measure magnetic fields that are generated by nerve impulses in extremities like in fingers. I know that they are very weak: about 100 mV electric potential would give us ...
10
votes
1answer
469 views

What does the latest $B_s^0\rightarrow \mu^+\mu^-$ results mean for SUSY?

A paper from the LHCb collaboration just came out last week, stating basically that the $B_s^0\rightarrow\mu^+\mu^-$ decay matches standard model predictions, and people are already shouting that SUSY ...
4
votes
3answers
404 views

QED: Would atoms without electrons be visible?

I have been reading a lot of QED books lately, and understand (as well as possible anyway) the interaction between electrons and photons. But I can't seem to get a clear indication of the interaction ...
4
votes
3answers
681 views

Vacuum energy and perpetual motion

The part of the Einstein equations of general relativity referred to vacuum energy, introduce a repulsive term in gravity. This means that as the space become bigger and bigger, vacuum part become ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

Basic questions about voltage drop in DC circuit

I understand all the concepts of what voltage is using all the analogies but some things related to the drop of voltage across a circuit confuses me. If I had a short circuit and attached a ...
2
votes
0answers
70 views

Dirichlet's work on gravity in non-Euclidean space?

In the book The Norton History of Astronomy and Cosmology by the late John North I have found the following statement (page 514): "The German mathematician Lejeune Dirichlet studied the law of ...
1
vote
1answer
111 views

Getting a given wavelength radio signal given an antenna with real-world constraints

Supposing you are given a transmitting antenna of whatever type of metal is most commonly used these days, and supposing that you are applying an AC current with the intent of transmitting a 1 m ...
14
votes
2answers
18k views

Why is Near Field Communication (NFC) range limited to about 20cm?

Near Field Communication (NFC) operates at 13.56 MHz. Near Field is the region situated at a distance r << λ λ = c/f ...
0
votes
1answer
474 views

Show that purity = 1 in a pure state

How can you show that for any pure state, the purity = 1? Pure state: $\rho^2 = \rho$ and $Tr(\rho^2)=1$ Mixed state: $\rho^2 = \rho$ and $Tr(\rho^2)<1$
0
votes
1answer
705 views

Refraction and Reflection Seismology

So I am wondering if I got the difference right. Both methods use explosives to send waves into the earth's surface. Now reflection seismology tries to get information from the reflected waves; the ...
4
votes
2answers
425 views

What is the exact relationship between scale invariance and renormalizability of a theory?

I have often read that renormalizability and scale invariance are somehow related. For example in this tutorial on page 12 in the first sentence of point (7), self similarity (= scale invariance ?) is ...

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