0
votes
0answers
257 views

The Deflecting System in a Hot Cathode Ray Tube

In an HCR-Tube, the deflecting system used to deviate the electron beam is made of positively charged plates. How is this justified? If, due to some malfunction, the electron beam deflects from its ...
6
votes
1answer
1k views

What are Wightman fields/functions

Simple question: What are Wightman fields? What are Wightman functions? What are their uses? For example can I use them in operator product expansions? How about in scattering theory?
-2
votes
1answer
516 views

How to reconstruct information from a graph of an oscillation? [closed]

We are given a graph of the position of a wave (amplitude). How can we calculate the wavelength, frequency and the maximum speed of a particle attached to that wave? We have Speed = wave length ...
2
votes
3answers
826 views

Difference in velocity of light in change in medium [duplicate]

It is often seen that according to physics the light changes it's velocity according to the medium through which it is traveling. So can it be explained that why so happen?
5
votes
4answers
365 views

Are a quantum mechanical system a chaotic (yet deterministic) system?

The title is slightly misleading. I really want to know if the randomness and probabilities observed in quantum mechanics is really just the result of a chaotic (yet deterministic) system. If it is ...
8
votes
5answers
939 views

The role of representation theory in QM/QFT?

I need help understanding the role of representation theory in QM/QFT. My understanding of representation theory in this context is as follows: there are physical symmetries of the system we are ...
5
votes
3answers
408 views

Takhatajan's mathematical formulation of quantum mechanics

So I began skimming L. Takhatajan's Quantum Mechanics For Mathematicians, and saw the mathematical formulation of QM that he uses (page 51). (The PDF file is available here.) I've only taken a basic ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Bernoulli's equation and reference frames

So I was thinking about this while driving home the other day. I've never been quite clear on why when you drive with the windows down air rushes into your car. I thought this might be explained by ...
2
votes
1answer
168 views

Definition of scattered particle?

Compare the number of scattered particles: $N_s=Fa\int\sigma(\theta)d\Omega$ With the total number of incident particles: $N_{in}=Fa$ Here, F is the flux of incoming beam, a the area. sigma the ...
9
votes
3answers
773 views

If superposition is possible in QM, why do we often assume systems are already in their eigenstates?

My understanding is that an arbitrary quantum-mechanical wavefunction can be written as a linear combination of eigenfunctions of some Hermitian operator, most commonly the Hamiltonian; when a ...
3
votes
1answer
67 views

The synthesis of $^{254}\text{No}$

How is $^{254}\text{No}$ synthesised? Could you explain the reaction where it is preceded by $^{208}\text{Pb}(^{48}\text{Ca}, 2\text{n})$? References to articles are well enough—I was somehow unable ...
2
votes
2answers
187 views

SI units with more than one prefix in fractions

Is it (in the view of SI) correct to note units with more then one prefix? I discuss this since several months with friends, but we could not find a proper source for our statements yet. Examples for ...
2
votes
1answer
144 views

Flat poster on a wall gaining curvature over time

Assuming you have a flat poster with no curvature, why is it that when you pin it to the wall (with thumbtacks) it gains curvature as seen in the picture below. When I put the poster up it was ...
2
votes
3answers
659 views

Find Inductance in a Coil

Question: An inductive coil has an internal resistance of 20 $\Omega$. When an AC Voltage source with a frequency of 100 Hz is connected to the coil, the current lags the voltage by 30 degrees. What ...
2
votes
1answer
194 views

What is the weakest magnetic field that can practically be measured?

I would like to be able to measure magnetic fields that are generated by nerve impulses in extremities like in fingers. I know that they are very weak: about 100 mV electric potential would give us ...
10
votes
1answer
466 views

What does the latest $B_s^0\rightarrow \mu^+\mu^-$ results mean for SUSY?

A paper from the LHCb collaboration just came out last week, stating basically that the $B_s^0\rightarrow\mu^+\mu^-$ decay matches standard model predictions, and people are already shouting that SUSY ...
4
votes
3answers
404 views

QED: Would atoms without electrons be visible?

I have been reading a lot of QED books lately, and understand (as well as possible anyway) the interaction between electrons and photons. But I can't seem to get a clear indication of the interaction ...
4
votes
3answers
679 views

Vacuum energy and perpetual motion

The part of the Einstein equations of general relativity referred to vacuum energy, introduce a repulsive term in gravity. This means that as the space become bigger and bigger, vacuum part become ...
1
vote
2answers
3k views

Basic questions about voltage drop in DC circuit

I understand all the concepts of what voltage is using all the analogies but some things related to the drop of voltage across a circuit confuses me. If I had a short circuit and attached a ...
2
votes
0answers
70 views

Dirichlet's work on gravity in non-Euclidean space?

In the book The Norton History of Astronomy and Cosmology by the late John North I have found the following statement (page 514): "The German mathematician Lejeune Dirichlet studied the law of ...
1
vote
1answer
111 views

Getting a given wavelength radio signal given an antenna with real-world constraints

Supposing you are given a transmitting antenna of whatever type of metal is most commonly used these days, and supposing that you are applying an AC current with the intent of transmitting a 1 m ...
14
votes
2answers
18k views

Why is Near Field Communication (NFC) range limited to about 20cm?

Near Field Communication (NFC) operates at 13.56 MHz. Near Field is the region situated at a distance r << λ λ = c/f ...
0
votes
1answer
474 views

Show that purity = 1 in a pure state

How can you show that for any pure state, the purity = 1? Pure state: $\rho^2 = \rho$ and $Tr(\rho^2)=1$ Mixed state: $\rho^2 = \rho$ and $Tr(\rho^2)<1$
0
votes
1answer
702 views

Refraction and Reflection Seismology

So I am wondering if I got the difference right. Both methods use explosives to send waves into the earth's surface. Now reflection seismology tries to get information from the reflected waves; the ...
4
votes
2answers
423 views

What is the exact relationship between scale invariance and renormalizability of a theory?

I have often read that renormalizability and scale invariance are somehow related. For example in this tutorial on page 12 in the first sentence of point (7), self similarity (= scale invariance ?) is ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Download only physics and maths wikipedia pages for offline use [closed]

There are tools for downloading the entire wikipedia database (above 8 Gb without pictures), but I would like to download only physics and maths pages, to view them offline. Wikipedia pages have a ...
0
votes
3answers
561 views

What is voltage: strict but intuitive definition from accumulator's perspective

I know, that voltage is analogous to pressure for charge, but analogies lie. I don't see charge pressing anything and I don't understand definition of $U=A/q$ (voltage = work/charge), cause I can't ...
9
votes
3answers
3k views

Have I discovered how to calculate the proton's mass using only integers?

Could it be possible that the mass of the proton can be calculated by a series of integer sequences? Or is this just a curiosity? $$\sum_{m=1}^{\infty } \frac{1}{10^{26}(m^2+1)_{2m}}=$$ ...
0
votes
2answers
1k views

Can electromagnetic fields be used to deconstruct and reconstruct atoms?

I was thinking one day and came up with a theory after reading about how scientists were studying anti-matter by using electro magnetic fields to separate matter from the anti-matter they made. It ...
0
votes
4answers
2k views

What does superposition mean in quantum mechanics?

What does superposition mean in quantum mechanics? When I say $A+B=C$ (forces). I can mean push something with force $A$ + force $B$ together, and that is same as I push it with force $C$. But when ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Schrödinger function: Separable wave function with even potential function of x

I have done the Problem 2.1 in Griffiths' quantum mechanics, and it seems not making sense to me. What if the wave function isn't symmetric at all? Then obviously the proof doesn't work. The ...
2
votes
2answers
221 views

Is there any law that prevents an object with mass to become massless?

I got into a discussion with my physics teacher about the speed of light and I asked What if an object with mass was to lose mass as it gained speed-- would that allow for an object to eventually ...
2
votes
2answers
418 views

How cold should it be outside for a hot coffee mug to break?

So I like to go outside for a morning coffee with a cigarette. In winter here it's usually between -5C to -25C, and sometimes it gets down to -30C and colder. Assuming that my coffee is about 75-80C, ...
6
votes
1answer
557 views

Aharonov-Bohm Effect and Integer Quantum Hall Effect

What is the relationship between Aharonov-Bohm effect and Integer Quantum Hall effect?
2
votes
2answers
630 views

Is wave–particle duality considered a valid interpretation of the behavior of photons?

There are a number of questions on this site that explain the many wave-like behaviors of photons by making reference to wave-particle duality. However, I have just finished reading Feynman's book ...
0
votes
2answers
316 views

Understanding the concept of period of motion in simple harmonic motion formula

I have a spring system, whose position equation is $$x(t) = c_1cos(8 \sqrt{2}t) + c_2sin(8 \sqrt{2}t)$$ The textbook says it will have a period of motion of $\frac{2 \pi}{(8 \sqrt{2}t)}$. I ...
5
votes
4answers
707 views

Meaning of the direction of the cross product

I was doing calculations with torque and then I came across something very confusing: I understand that the magnitude of the torque is given by product of the displacement(from the center of ...
4
votes
1answer
119 views

Practical meaning of making a measurement/observation in QM?

When an argument like 'measure the spin along the $x$ axis', 'observe the position of a particle' and so on is made, what is the implied experimental procedure? Since laboratory equipment is ...
2
votes
1answer
495 views

Two masses with interacting forces and an external force

Two masses in 3d space attract each other with a potential relative to the distance between them. There is also an external force on each particle based on the distance from a origin. I want to find ...
3
votes
1answer
308 views

How would an observer perceive movement on a train that's travelling near the speed of light?

Person A is on Earth and a train (or whatever you want to imagine) travels past him at near the speed of light. How would person A perceive movement on the ship? If time is slowed on the ship from the ...
3
votes
3answers
524 views

How can we create superposition in QM?

How can we force a particle (let's say that we know this particle has spin up) to be in a superposition of spin up and down? Wouldn't literally any interaction of it with anything cause it to be in ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Applying angular velocity to a rotation matrix

I have a very simple question. In our project we store an object's orientation as a 3x3 matrix which holds the orthonormal base of that object's local space. For instance if the object is aligned with ...
5
votes
2answers
551 views

Why doesn't a neon sign seem that hot?

I heard that neon signs contain plasma, why aren't they hot? is it because the electrons and ions do not hit the lamp's wall? Is it because it is non thermal plasma and electrons and ions are not in ...
6
votes
5answers
4k views

Relativistic momentum

I have been trying to derive why relativistic momentum is defined as $p=\gamma mv$. I set up a collision between 2 same balls ($m_1 = m_2 = m$). Before the collision these two balls travel one ...
3
votes
2answers
5k views

Normal Forces and Ferris Wheels

At the moment, I am reading an example problem regarding what was alluded to in the title. In this example problem, they say, "Based on experiences you may have had on a ferris wheel or driving over ...
2
votes
2answers
387 views

Does every measurement correspond to an eigenstate of an observable?

In the postulates of quantum mechanics, physical observables are described by Hermitian matrices on the state space of a system. In another of my questions, the measurements of Rydberg-Ritz spectral ...
0
votes
1answer
389 views

Question about finding $k$ in Hooke's Law

My textbook (Advanced Engineering Mathematics by Dennis Zill) offers the following explanation of Hooke's Law: By Hooke's Law, the spring itself exerts a restoring force $F$ opposite to the ...
3
votes
1answer
234 views

What velocity must an aircraft achieve for its shock wave to transform to plasma?

A follow-up to After what speed air friction starts to heat up an object? I understand there may be technological limitations at present ... but, is it theoretically possible for a body to travel ...
6
votes
7answers
2k views

Is there any reproducible tested evidence for Ni-H cold fusion?

The main replications of cold fusion, the ones that are beyond reproach, used Pd/d as the system. But commercial developers have often claim to use Ni-H to achieve similar effects. The claims include ...
2
votes
2answers
243 views

Why does leaning back make a kicked ball go higher?

It's relatively common knowledge that when one kicks a football, if they lean back the ball usually goes higher, and if they lean forward slightly it goes at a more desirable height. Why does leaning ...

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