5
votes
1answer
157 views

To what extent correlation functions determines the theory (and lagranian)

In other words, does a finite set correlation functions sufficient to determine a theory? Is there a chance correlation functions are more fundamental then the lagrangian?
0
votes
3answers
2k views

Does brightness of the light remains constant with the variation of the distance with respect to the source in vaccum?

I have this question going in my mind from many days, i.e why brightness of light emitted from any light source around us decreases with distance? The brightness of light from tube light, streetlight, ...
1
vote
0answers
88 views

4 of Einstein equations without 2nd order time derivative

This question is related to my previous one and it was a homework problem and was due two weeks ago. Problem:prove that four of Einsteins' equations $$ G_{0\nu} = 8\pi T_{0\nu} $$ have to 2nd order ...
1
vote
0answers
57 views

Black hole entangled with the cosmological horizon

Maldacena and Susskind recently proposed a interesting and very suggestive duality between entanglement and topological identification: http://arxiv.org/abs/1306.0533 But are such ideas applicable to ...
2
votes
1answer
91 views

Steam bath physics

In the steam bath at the health club, why is the "steam" thicker first thing in the morning before it has been used all day and the walls are "hotter"?
0
votes
1answer
732 views

Does greater number of lines of force around the magnet imply greater magnetic field strength around it?

If we sprinkle iron fillings on a sheet of glass placed over a short bar magnet. The arrangement of iron fillings will be similar to the one shown above. Why do some of the iron fillings ...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

Resource about Supercontinuum Generation in Fibers

I would like to consult a nice reference that explains the theoretical background of SC generation in optical fibers in detail but more or less self-contained. I would also like to have your opinions ...
0
votes
0answers
316 views

Acting on a current density operator in second quantization

I have a current density operator in second quantization in the form: $\hat{J} = -i\left(\psi^\dagger \partial_x \psi - (\partial_x \psi^\dagger) \psi \right) $ operating on some state: $|\phi ...
0
votes
1answer
107 views

Quantum physics and object location

If I understand correctly, according to quantum physics, subatomic particles can "leap" from one location to another (for example, from a location on earth to a location on the "other side" of the ...
2
votes
0answers
155 views

High Young's Modulus and Tensile Strength of Carbon Nanotubes

I was recently reading about Carbon Nanotubes having extremely high Young's moduli, as well as high Tensile Strength, making them very interesting fibers. However, when I read this I wondered what was ...
1
vote
2answers
265 views

Separation of variables in various PDEs, physical meaning

The method of separation of variables produces an undetermined separation constant and a family of solutions indexed by the values of this constant. For instance, in the case of an infinitely long ...
1
vote
0answers
69 views

How is the probability of intersystem crossing influenced by small differences in energy levels?

Say I have some dye molecule in some low level triplet state, e.g. $T_1$, and it's decaying slowly to the ground state via phosphorescence. However, there are also events where the dye in the $T_1$ ...
0
votes
2answers
209 views

Determinstic implementation Sphere of Influence change using Patched conic approximation

wasn't 100% sure which StackExchange to ask this on, as it could be related to Gamedev (as it's for a game), maths (as it's a approximation model rather than a physical description) or StackOverflow ...
0
votes
1answer
214 views

shear and normal stresses

When we talk about shear stresses in a fluid, we find that the shear stress is given by $$\tau_{xy} = \mu(\partial_y u + \partial_x v) = \tau_{yx}$$ This relation we get when only looking at one side ...
1
vote
1answer
381 views

What is “number degrees of freedom for frequency ν”. Frequency is 1D right?

The book QM Demystified states this about black body radiation spectrum: An attempt to explain these results using classical theory was codified in the Rayleigh-Jeans formula, which is an ...
11
votes
3answers
491 views

Does radio use virtual photons?

In radio communication each accelerated electron in the transmitter antenna interacts with an electron in the receiver antenna by exchanging a photon. Is that photon always a virtual photon as ...
0
votes
2answers
552 views

Understanding Wikipedia's “Semiconductor Band Structure” diagram where the bandgap appears to increase with increasing density of states

I'm having a bit of trouble understanding the semiconductor band gap diagram on Wikipedia: (from Band gap article). Why is the size of the band gap increasing with the Density of States (DOS) in the ...
2
votes
2answers
604 views

Gravity on the International Space Station - General Relativity perspective

My question is an extension to this one: Gravity on the International Space Station. If all the outside views of the ISS was sealed, then the crew inside would not be able to tell whether they were ...
1
vote
1answer
150 views

At what frequency does the medium of air change from acoustic to light?

I'm calculating the max doppler frequency of a fading channel in an in-room environment and looking at different carrier frequencies. Calculated as follows: F = vf/c Where F -> max doppler shift v ...
2
votes
2answers
85 views

What gives an object its colour?

My understanding of colour is that atoms in a particular object will absorb certain wavelengths of electromagnetic radiation, and the scattered wavelengths give the object its colour. The absorbed ...
4
votes
2answers
2k views

Nuclear Spin of Sodium 23

I am actually calculating the nuclear spin of Sodium 23. Here we have 11 protons and 12 neutrons. Now both the nuclei are short of the magic numbers. When I use the shell model for protons and ...
4
votes
0answers
153 views

Calculating Forces via Feynman diagrams?

How would one go about calculating forces that test objects feel using Feynman diagram methods? For example, say we have a massive object in GR so that the metric takes on the standard ...
1
vote
0answers
150 views

Lenz's Law and Eddy Currents

You can determine the direction of eddy currents according to Lenz's law. E.g. If a metal sheet is losing flux into the page, it will experience induced eddy currents in a clockwise direction to ...
2
votes
2answers
22k views

Does pressure drop across pipe affect flow rate?

Let's say there is a main pipe containing $100\: \mathrm{m^3/hr}$ a fluid of density $750\: \mathrm{kg/m^3}$ and it's gonna be branched into 2 pipes (Pipe A and Pipe B) of the same diameter. If Pipe A ...
7
votes
1answer
429 views

Basic question about the S-Matrix, Unitarity and Effective Field Theory

Consider scattering some particles in a state collectively denoted by $i$ to a final state denote by $f$. The scattering amplitude, S-matrix is then defined by: $S_{fi}\equiv \langle ...
2
votes
2answers
244 views

Is the sign in the Schrodinger equation physical?

I always have trouble remembering the sign in factors like $\exp(\pm ik\cdot x)$ (I'll use mostly minus signature here) that arise in field theory. My mnemonic is to remember that the Schrodinger ...
1
vote
1answer
403 views

BCS Theory of Superconductivity

I'm currently taking an introduction to Solid State Physics class, and is now on the subject of superconductivity (SC). Currently I'm reading about the BCS theory, and how this works on a microscopic ...
1
vote
1answer
137 views

are there any “known unknowns” that could affect the possibility of a false vacuum?

(Although Donald Rumsfeld was mocked for talking about "known unknowns" and "unknown unknowns", I think it's an truly important distinction.) Periodically, I hear about how the universe might be in a ...
3
votes
2answers
1k views

How do gravitons and curved space time work together? [duplicate]

I've heard two different descriptions of gravity, and I'm wondering how they work together. The first is Gravitons: "The three other known forces of nature are mediated by elementary particles: ...
4
votes
2answers
245 views

$2\pi$ and Feynman Rules

I notice a $2\pi$ term in the $\delta$-function when trying to construct an amplitude using the Feynman Rules. The $2\pi$ also appears as an integration measure to enforce normalisation in the phase ...
4
votes
1answer
117 views

What sets AdS radius of the Vasiliev dual to the O(N) vector model?

In $\mathrm{AdS}_5$/$\mathrm{CFT}_4$ the AdS radius $R$ is determined in terms of the string length by the gauge theory t'Hooft parameter as follows \begin{equation} \frac{R}{l_{\rm s}} \sim ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

Neutrinos arrived before the photons (supernova)

A while back I read about the super Kamiokande detector detected a large neutrino flux and then several hours later a supernova was seen. Anyone know of this with sources? I don't recall the source at ...
0
votes
0answers
72 views

Explanation of the classical coupling of the Higgs Field to Electromagnetism

I'm interested in learning about the classical coupling of the Higgs Field to Electromagnetism. There are numerous sources explaining the Higgs mechanism quantum mechanically, i.e. How does the Higgs ...
5
votes
3answers
1k views

How do charge carriers move thermal energy? (Peltier effect)

I am having hard time understanding how the charge carriers (electrons and holes) are able to move thermal energy. I am on a high school physics level, so I will probably have a hard time ...
0
votes
2answers
227 views

Symmetries of relativistic Lagrangian and Hamiltonian systems

In non-relativistic mechanics, the conserved quantities found using Noethers theorem in Lagrangian mechanics are the same as those quantities which are conserved under canonical commutation with the ...
1
vote
1answer
546 views

Can capillary forces be used to make hydro electricity?

Could a device with very thin columns of glass or something that attracts water more be used to pull water up and then release it to drive generator and perhaps add vacuum. I have been wondering ...
0
votes
2answers
93 views

Components of forces?

Let's say we have an object lying on a slope, the weight of the object can be divided into two components one horizontal and one vertical. My question is does the weight act only in these two ...
-7
votes
2answers
7k views

Why objects of different masses accelerate at the same speed under gravity [closed]

If you push massive object it accelerates slowly compared to object which is of same size but less density/mass. However, all objects do Accelerate at the same rate. ...
1
vote
1answer
281 views

Units of the PDF in the Lattice Boltzmann Method

In the Lattice Boltzmann method we require (based on mass conservation) that the sum of the distribution functions for a node is equal to the density, i.e. $$ \sum_i f_i = \rho $$ But what units do ...
1
vote
1answer
127 views

What does $\nu$ mean in relativity?

I decided to teach myself relativity over the Christmas holiday, and I've gotten a bit stuck. Coordinates in space time can be defined by a collection of coordinates, $$ x^0 = ct \\ x^1 = x \\ x^2 = ...
5
votes
1answer
152 views

To what degree does guitar construction affects the vibration of the strings?

There's an old debate going on in the guitar community about how much does wood choice and body shape affect the sound of an electric guitar. No one denies that there's a difference acoustically (how ...
1
vote
0answers
45 views

Allowed transformations in General Relativity [duplicate]

So in Special Relativity we have: $$ \Lambda \eta \Lambda^T=\eta $$ Is there an analagous formula for the metric in General Relativity?
0
votes
1answer
142 views

Heat balance: how to obtain T(t) with energy in the form u(T(t))

I have the heat balance equation for a cooling case in the form: $$\frac{dU(T(t))}{dt}=-J$$ with $U$: energy (J) $T$: temperature (K) $t$: time (s) $J$: heat flux leaving the system (W) I have ...
3
votes
0answers
113 views

Bubbling metal vapor through liquid Helium?

When a metal cools from its liquid state, part of the nucleation happens from pre-existing clusters (a group of unit cells of the crystal lattice) already present in the liquid. In the case of a ...
1
vote
1answer
485 views

Riemann curvature tensor symmetries confusion

In the context of spacetime, reading Schutz, I'm confused about the symmetries of the Riemann curvature tensor, which I understand are: ...
3
votes
1answer
1k views

Axial forces on a solenoid windings

I understand that the windings in a solenoid experience a Lorentz force $\mathbf{f} = \mathbf{J} \times \mathbf{B}$, which tend to cause an outward pressure where $\mathbf{B}$ is directed along the ...
4
votes
3answers
313 views

Some small questions about quantum spin and rotations

I'm studying about quantum-spin (in a syllabus about non-relativistic quantum-mechanics though), but I have some trouble understanding everything. So I would like to ask some small questions, which ...
2
votes
3answers
193 views

How to smooth the spectrum of a light source?

Could somebody please tell me if there's a reasonably cheap substance or device can I use to smooth the spectrum of a light source? For example, if the spectrum has spikes as in the blue graph below, ...
5
votes
1answer
312 views

What are the arguments for gravity not being a force? (in quantum gravity)

In quantum gravity the standard assumtion is that gravity is a force, although there is a small but persistent group of theorethical physicists who think otherwise. What gives us the motivation to ...
1
vote
1answer
136 views

Best way to check for anisotropy given a metric tensor

Carroll gives the definition of isotropy at a point as given vector $V$ and $W$ in $T_{p}M$, there is some isometry that can push $V$ forward such that it ends up parallel to $W$. I understand what ...

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