2
votes
0answers
88 views

Stat mech explanation for separation of one liquid from another in gravity?

If one mixes two distinct ideal gases above the Earth's surface, one with a higher molecular mass than the other, then at equilibrium, their number density gradients will be such that at low heights, ...
0
votes
1answer
3k views

Energy in orbit of satellites around the earth lost?

If the total mechanical energy in a satellite's orbit (assuming circular) is greater when it is closer to the earth, and hence smaller when it is farther from the earth, then we can say that as the ...
0
votes
3answers
3k views

If hydrogen and helium are lighter than air, why won't liquid hydrogen and liquid helium defy gravity?

Title says it all. If hydrogen and helium are lighter than air, why won't liquid hydrogen and liquid helium defy gravity?
17
votes
1answer
1k views

Why don't tuning forks have three prongs?

I was reading Why tuning forks have two prongs?. The top answer said the reason was to reduce oscillation through the hand holding the other prong. So if having 2 prongs will reduce oscillation loss, ...
3
votes
0answers
269 views

Is it mathematically possible or topologically allowable for cutouts, or cavities, to exist in a 3-manifold?

A few weeks back, I posted a related question, Could metric expansion create holes, or cavities in the fabric of spacetime?, asking if metric stretching could create cutouts in the spacetime manifold. ...
2
votes
0answers
56 views

Was Einstein's Cross Predicted by Einstein's Theories? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How does gravitational lensing account for Einstein’s Cross? Einstein's Cross is a fascinating phenomena for which I have asked explanation here. However, I'm also ...
3
votes
0answers
82 views

Gravitational effects and metric spaces

Could somebody please explain something regarding the Nordstrom metric? In particular, I am referring to the last part of question 3 on this sheet -- about the freely falling massive bodies. My ...
83
votes
6answers
8k views

Why do tuning forks have two prongs?

I believe the purpose of a tuning fork is to produce a single pure frequency of vibration. How do two coupled vibrating prongs isolate a single frequency? Is it possible to produce the same effect ...
2
votes
2answers
4k views

Materials with a high compressive strength to weight ratio

We know about extremely strong materials such as carbon nanotubes. However, this is only in tension. What are some high strength-to-weight materials (both available and hypothetical) in uniaxial ...
1
vote
0answers
169 views

Range of forces from mass of force carrier?

Why is $\frac{\hbar}{mc}$ a good estimate of the range of the four forces, where $m$ is the mass of the carrier particle of the force? Inputting the pion mass gives $1.4\ \mathrm{fm}$ for the hadronic ...
6
votes
2answers
152 views

Is it possible to have annealing without creep?

Annealing can repair a material by allowing atoms to find the minimum energy state; since solids have a surface tension this process will allow cracks to fuse and reverse fatigue. However, annealing ...
1
vote
3answers
502 views

where the proper time is invariant why $d\tau$ is not zero?

where the proper time is invariant why change (differential) in proper time $d\tau$ is not zero? $\Delta \tau=\tau_f-\tau_i$ as i know. $d(invariant)=0$ note to comment: action $S=-m_oc^2\int_C d\tau$ ...
1
vote
2answers
516 views

Where inside a large uniformly dense, symmetrical sphere would its gravity toward the center be the strongest?

Imagine a sphere of uniform density with similar volume and average density of our Earth. There is a bore leading to the center of the sphere from the surface with a scale at regular intervals. At ...
1
vote
1answer
704 views

Wave functions for three identical fermions

I would like to express the wave functions for three identical particles, each with orbital angular momentum $L=1$ and spin angular momentum $S=1/2$, in terms of single-particle wave functions. In ...
3
votes
3answers
414 views

Is this interpretation of $\psi=\frac{1}{\sqrt{\pi a^{3}}}e^{-r/a}$ correct?

Apologies if this is stating the obvious, but I'm a non-physicist trying to understand Griffiths' discussion of the hydrogen atom in chapter 4 of Introduction to Quantum Mechanics. The wave equation ...
0
votes
2answers
213 views

Two moons of Earth?

Hypothetically, suppose there is a situation where the Earth's moon gets neatly sliced into two equal hemispheres, and the force responsible for this slicing also creates a distance between the two ...
1
vote
0answers
71 views

Interaction energy calculation in QFT

Suppose I have a QFT action describing interaction of two objects and I can perturbative write the action as $S=S_0+S_i$ where $S_0$ is the non-interacting, unperturbed action and $S_i$ is the ...
1
vote
0answers
62 views

Do Boundary Conditions depend on spin connections for gauge fields?

In the article arXiv:1206.5642, which talks about gauge fields in conical spacetime, I came across the statement in footnote 4 that the boundary conditions on the gauge field depend on the spin ...
3
votes
2answers
459 views

Why do hot objects prefer to emit photons over electrons ? Is there electron-positron annihilation?

Why do hot objects prefer to emit photons over electrons ? Is there electron-positron annihilation ? If so , why ? Im confused by this.
1
vote
0answers
31 views

Does a flame produce free electrons? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Does Fire Conduct Electricity? Why? Is fire plasma? Does a flame produce free electrons ? Or is the answer sometimes depending on the chemicals ? Does the answer depend ...
5
votes
8answers
689 views

What exactly are we doing when we set $c=1$?

I understand the idea of swapping from unit systems, say from ms$^{-1}$ to kms$^{-1}$, but why can we just delete the units altogether? My question is: what exactly are we doing when we say that ...
1
vote
1answer
416 views

How much (usable) potential energy is stored in a compound bow?

I have done a bit of reading about the energy stored in bows, but I haven't seen anywhere a description of how much energy actually is stored. Clearly there are many factors, bow design being ...
1
vote
3answers
2k views

What does the quantum state of a system tell us about itself?

In quantum mechanics, quantum state refers to the state of a quantum system. A quantum state is given as a vector in a vector space, called the state vector. The state vector theoretically ...
2
votes
0answers
42 views

Scattering in quantum wires

I'm working on a project involving scattering of particles in networks of quantum wires off of point scatterers. The problem that I am having is that even in fairly simple configurations of quantum ...
1
vote
1answer
495 views

Double-counting correction in a LDA + DMFT calculation

To theoretically study correlated materials, one usually has to consult to the LDA + DMFT calculations, in which the two-particle interaction is usually double-counted. A general recipe for the ...
4
votes
1answer
510 views

Time-ordering in QFT

In Srednicki QFT page 37. In the derivation of LSZ reduction formula, he introduces the time-order operator $T$, so no time-dependent creation/annihilation operators are left in the transition ...
2
votes
1answer
419 views

Is it wrong to associate non-isotropic flow high with Reynolds-Number and is there a better metric?

IT is often stated the flow with high Re is not isotropic, meaning there is no uniform or dominant direction of the flow. But this seems wrong to me - -while there's certainly cases where no dominant ...
-1
votes
1answer
586 views

How much pressure is needed to break an egg if applied from top and bottom?

Everybody knows that you can't break an egg with our fingers when pushing from top and bottom. I assume if we could squeeze hard enough the egg would break?
2
votes
0answers
82 views

Topological Solitons and the Higgs Condensate entanglement

While focusing on resolutions to the Firewall controversy, and the possible implications of the Higgs field as it relates to the issue, the possibility of using EPR correlations in the Higgs ...
1
vote
1answer
221 views

Show that $\partial_\nu T^{\mu\nu} = - j_\nu F^{\mu\nu}$

In a theoretical physics homework problem, I have to show the following: $$\partial_\nu T^{\mu\nu} = - j_\nu F^{\mu\nu}$$ Where $T$ is the Energie-Momentum-Tensor, $j$ the generalized current and $F$ ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

How are current and voltage out of phase in capacitive circuit? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Physical explanation for capacitive circuit We say that in capacitive circuit, the voltage and current are out of phase. Current is 90 (degrees) ahead of voltage. What ...
3
votes
1answer
147 views

all the 1-dimensional problems in newtonian mechanics are solvable?

i mean given a system with a conserved Energy in one dimension $$ E= \frac{p^{2}}{2m}+V(x) $$ then the 'solution' to this problem is implicitly given by $$ t(x)= \frac{1}{2m} ...
2
votes
0answers
198 views

How can I determine the type of magnet used in a DC motor?

I repair electrical motors in a workshop and sometimes I must repair permanent magnet DC motors and other motors that use permanent magnets. I need to specify type of permanent magnet (Ferrite or ...
5
votes
2answers
485 views

statistics for photon counts in photomultiplier

It seems that a common statistical model for the count numbers of a photomultiplier is a Poisson distribution whose parameter $\lambda$ equals to the square-root of the number of counts.(e.g. ...
3
votes
2answers
321 views

Total radiation flux from a star

I'm looking around the net to find good resources on how to compute total radiation flux from a given star at a given orbiting distance. Ideally I'd like to get not just the $W/m^2$ of the star, but ...
0
votes
1answer
125 views

Do we reside in any particular dimension(s)?

In other words does it make sense to say that we live or exist in dimension x? Or do dimensions not apply to reality the universe its self?
3
votes
1answer
664 views

Is there any case in classical mechanics where Newton's (strong) third law doesn't hold?

Is there any case in classical (non relativistic) mechanics where the strong form of Newton's third law does not hold (that is, reaction forces are not collinear)? For example, if we consider a system ...
3
votes
0answers
164 views

Can mass dimension of a field be viewed as another 'quantum number'?

While studying SUSY in 4D, I noticed the dynamical chiral superfield has dimension [GeV], whereas the dynamical vector superfield (for gauge theories) is unitless. Because I was introduced to the ...
5
votes
0answers
101 views

Are irrelevant terms in the Kahler potential always irrelevant, even at strong coupling?

I've been reading about the duality cascade in Strassler's TASI '03 lectures (hep-th/0505153). He reminds us of the non-renormalization theorem theorem for the superpotential so that the beta ...
0
votes
1answer
135 views

Can the zeroth-component of a 4-velocity be negative?

Is it allowed to have the zeroth-component of a four-velocity be negative? I presume the answer is yes, but I just want to make sure. Many thanks. This is referring to $V^0$ for a curved space ...
2
votes
4answers
290 views

Is it feasible to detect light emitted from planet earth 2,000 years ago by reflection from an object situated 1000 light years away?

The possibility though remote, is intriguing as we may be able in the future to actually "see" our own planet's history. Though sounding science fiction, if we are able to detect bodies in space that ...
9
votes
2answers
256 views

Word for the star around which an exoplanet orbits:

Is there accepted nomenclature for the star around which a particular exoplanet orbits? Meaning, if I were to say "The exoplanet blah blah blah's (noun)" what noun would I put there? Sun? Star? ...
10
votes
0answers
448 views

Renormalization group evolution equations and ill-posed problems

There is a class of observables in QFT (event shapes, parton density functions, light-cone distribution amplitudes) whose the renormalization-group (RG) evolution takes the form of an ...
5
votes
3answers
8k views

What does this quote about the four dimensional divergence of an antisymmetric tensor mean?

In the beginning, God said that the four dimensional divergence of an antisymmetric second rank tensor equals zero and there was light. Can someone explain what is the meaning of this quote by ...
5
votes
1answer
182 views

Why does unbroken supersymmetry imply the absence of tachyons?

Just a quick question, same as in the title. I'm trying to understand stable D-branes.
-2
votes
1answer
79 views

heating verses air conditioning [closed]

My Co-workers and I are trying to figure this out, but can't think of a logical answer. It's probably an easy one, but I'll ask anyway- Ok, the heater is set at 73 degrees. The a/c is set at 73 ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

Confused about fire?

Im confused about fire. The way I see it : Heat creates (kinetic) energy in mass and this creates stronger vibrations of atoms. When those vibrations are strong enough the electrons interact ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Does the increase of (relativistic) mass, while flying near speed of light, has any impact on astronauts? [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Would travelling at relativistic speeds have any impact on human biology? I am asking myself this question for a few day. What is the answer on: Does the increase of ...
2
votes
2answers
230 views

Non-destructive measurement of qbits

Yale news "New qubit control bodes well for future of quantum computing" (Original paper) says: "The Yale physicists successfully devised a new, non-destructive measurement system for observing, ...
0
votes
1answer
107 views

How were the crystal lattices of elements determined to perfection ? (Ex:- That of a copper is a cubic lattice ) [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: How can crystal structures be determined using X-ray diffraction? Are there any simple means in order to verify the nature of complex lattices like that of Triclinic , ...

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