2
votes
1answer
351 views

How does tempered glass work?

I've read that tempered glass work by heating and then rapidly cooling the glass so that the outer layer 'freezes' (stops expanding/contracting) but the core contracts further as it cools. I'm told ...
2
votes
1answer
441 views

How can a vacuum have a breakdown voltage?

This question (What is the capacitance between the Earth and Moon?) on EESE makes me wonder: How can a vacuum have a breakdown voltage? If electrons can find the shortest path through a vacuum, ...
1
vote
0answers
62 views

Logistic map and attractors

Does the logistic map have a strange attractor for some "chaotic" values of the parameter?
2
votes
0answers
39 views

What is the effective physical difference between a massive region of a polarized vacuum and a region of curved space-time?

What is the effective physical difference between a large region of curved space-time and an equally large region of a polarized vacuum? Consider the fact that vacuum polarization amounts to an ...
0
votes
2answers
66 views

Current and magnetism [closed]

When the current in 2 parallel wires flows in same direction they attract each other.Shouldn't the electrons travelling in opposite direction should also repel ?
0
votes
1answer
85 views

Monopoles in non-abelian semi-simple gauge groups

Relative to the following Indeed, the modern point of view is that the operator of electric charge is the generator of a U(1) group. The charge quantization condition arises in models of ...
4
votes
2answers
282 views

Non-local structure of field theory

Can someone explain what is non-local structure of field theory? I know you cannot have $\phi(x) \phi(y)$ term in Lagrangian which indicates the non-locality. However, why I cannot have the non-local ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Are there reasons for the discrepancies in absolute temp units - Kelvin vs. kelvins vs. degrees Kelvin?

Before 1968, the units for absolute temperature were described as "degrees Kelvin" or "degrees absolute." After that, the SI system got rid of the idea of "degree" for absolute temperature, so the ...
4
votes
1answer
59 views

What technological advance would allow LEP3 to surpass LEP2?

I learned that for electron accelerators synchrotron radiation and acceleration are the limiting factors. This article, that I found in one answer to this question mentions that one would not use the ...
3
votes
3answers
185 views

What does “an average over noise” mean in Zwanzig's book

This is a very specific question about Robert Zwanzig's book Nonequilibrium Statistical Mechanics. Specifically, what is he talking about in equation 1.25 on page 10 that he calls "an average over ...
2
votes
1answer
113 views

Pulse Reflection

I wanted to ask why a pulse that reaches to a free end will reflect off and return with the same direction of displacement that it had before reflection. I am looking for explanation with forces.
7
votes
3answers
660 views

Can one assign an equivalence principle of some kind to the EM field?

Introduction: Consider the EM field. There was a time when the field was defined in a similar manner to that of the gravitational field. This changed when the view on gravitation evolved to this ...
0
votes
1answer
97 views

Is the universe expanding faster than we could catch up with it? [closed]

Like the title says, could we ever catch up with the expanding universe?
4
votes
1answer
275 views

Why is a dipole moment called a dipole moment?

The General Formula for a moment is the following one: $$ \vec{M} = \vec{r} \times \vec{F}. $$ However the formula for a dipole moment is this one: $$ \vec{p} = Q \vec{d}. $$ How comes this is still ...
0
votes
1answer
86 views

Initial velocities of a collision [closed]

This is the question: A car of mass 900 kg and a van of mass 1300 kg collide at a crossroads. Investigation into the collision discloses that the car was travelling south east and that the van was ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

Can the thermal energy in an object be aligned, creating a thermal jerk?

Thermal energy is related to the speed at which atoms vibrate, therefor thermal energy is a form of motion. In a stationary object, all of these vibrating atoms 'impact' each other in such a way that ...
4
votes
1answer
699 views

Rotational Friction

This is the question- Consider a cylinder of mass $M$ resting on a rough horizontal rug that is pulled out from under it with acceleration $a$ perpendicular to the axis of the cylinder. What is $F$ ...
2
votes
2answers
91 views

What were the maximal collision energy of the LHC if it were rewired to $e^{-}-e^{+}$ collisions?

Yes, I know, that it weren't a large hadron collider then. No, I don't think, that the creators of the LHC didn't know what they do. I am just curious. How could it be calculated? A such rewiring ...
5
votes
2answers
103 views

Possible mechanics based on the known symmetries in the nature (investigating rumor)

Somewhere I've heard about a relative new mathematical result regarding mechanics. Specifically, there is a list of the known symmetries of mechanics (both Newtonian and relativistic), i.e. different ...
15
votes
1answer
1k views

How intense a magnetic field would it take to keep an hypothetical iron-made moon orbiting around it?

The intention of the question is to provide an example of the weakness of gravity. I imagine a horseshoe magnet located at the Earth's centre (remove the Earth), and a ferromagnetic moon. How ...
6
votes
4answers
473 views

Why are stresses of continuum systems described via a tensor?

The tittle pretty much says enough. I have always been told so but no one really motivated it. So, I would like to know why do we use a tensor to describe the stresses in continuum mechanics.
1
vote
1answer
104 views

Read-off particle from (projected) Dynkin labels

In the review of Slanksy "Group theory for unified model building" in chapter 6: How do one relate the projected Dynkin diagrams from for example $\overline{5}+10$ of $su(5)$ to the corresponding ...
0
votes
1answer
232 views

why countries can't make nuclear bombs? [closed]

Somehow when I google about the nuclear bombs I find a lot of books and resources that seem to explain everything about how those bombs are made. But sometimes I often hear that countries that want to ...
2
votes
1answer
437 views

Stuck following derivation of geodesic equation

In the book "Reflections on Relativity" by Kevin Brown, there is a chapter called "Relatively Straight", in which he derives the geodesic equations using the Euler equation. Online version Just ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

How to convert acceleration in g to speed velocity in meter /s [closed]

I'm working on an inertial measurement unit with some MEM'S component. I want to retrieve data on a micro-controller. I have 3-axis accelerometer sensor. however I want retrieve data in $mg$ ( ...
2
votes
1answer
133 views

What is the minimal symmetry required for a spin Hamiltonian to describe a spin-liquid ground state?

Let's restrict to the case of spin-1/2 system. As we know, a spin-liquid (SL) state is the ground state of a lattice spin Hamiltonian with no spontaneous broken symmetries (sometime it may ...
1
vote
0answers
66 views

Apparent elimination of overlapping divergences

The integral, $$ \iint_{\mathbb{R}^{2+}}\frac{xy}{1+x+y} \mathrm{d}y \, \mathrm{d}x$$ possesses an overlapping divergence when $ x \to \infty $ and $ y \to \infty $. However, under a change of ...
0
votes
0answers
87 views

entropy in Information theory vs thermodynamic?

We Now From Information Theory That Entropy Of Functions Of A Random Variable $X$ Is Less Than Or Equal To The Entropy Of $X$. Does It Break The Second Law Of Thermodynamic?
-1
votes
1answer
59 views

Curves satisfying this functional [closed]

This is a problem in Hartle's "GRAVITY": Consider the functional $$S[x(t)]= \int_{0}^{T} \left[\left(\frac{dx(t)}{dt}\right)^2 + x^2(t)\right]\text{ }dt$$ Find the curve $x(t)$ satisfying the ...
5
votes
1answer
120 views

How does one prove that the current of a spontaneously broken symmetry generates a particle?

I am having a hard time arguing that, after spontaneous breaking of a continuous symmetry of a field Lagrangian, local fluctuations around the vacuum can be interpreted as particles (without referring ...
-1
votes
1answer
31 views

Cosmic Microwave Background and heat flow

Can the fact that energy is distributed homogeneously in the universe be explained through heat flow and not the Cosmic Microwave Background(or in other words, can we say CMB is a result of heat flow ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Ladder operator on momentum basis

Since in Quantum mechanics momentum operator can be written in terms of ladder operators $$\widehat{p}=-i\sqrt\frac{{\hbar m \omega}}{2}(\widehat{a}-\widehat{a}^\dagger)$$ these operators operate on ...
3
votes
3answers
542 views

How could I determine the temperature at which an egg explodes

A while back, some friends and I pondered "what will happen to an egg if placed very near a campfire". So we placed an egg on a grill, approximately 12 inches above a real campfire. Something like ...
0
votes
1answer
152 views

How the gravitational constant $G$ is determined?

We know the gravitational constant is $G=6.67545 \times 10^{-11} m^3 kg^{-1} s^{-2}$. But how this value is determined at first?
3
votes
2answers
7k views

Moment of inertia of disc with a hole

Suppose we have a disc with a hole, when computing moment of inertia of this about the disc's centre. Why do we subtract the moment of inertia of the removed part from the moment of inertia of ...
0
votes
1answer
808 views

Geometric optics- Sign conventions

Why do we need to use the sign convention again in the mirror equation while solving numericals when we know we have already used a convention while deriving the mirror equation? The question is not ...
0
votes
1answer
58 views

Regarding the theory of the origin of water on earth through meteorites, why wouldn't the water evaporate on impact?

Water on earth has been theorized to have come through comets trapped inside crystals. But why wouldn't that water evaporate on impact, and wouldn't the atmosphere at that time allow the vapours to ...
-5
votes
1answer
119 views

Why $\vec F=m\vec a$ instead of $\vec F=m\vec v$? [duplicate]

$\vec F=m\vec a$ ,for moving object with 10 $km/s$ in a constant manner ,where acceleration is zero. ie No force on object ? http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=622711
3
votes
2answers
86 views

What would cause a spinning fluid to stop spinning?

I once saw a demonstration where an electric current caused a drop of mercury to spin. The drop contained bits of iron, which could be seen flowing around in a circular pattern. As soon as the ...
1
vote
2answers
571 views

Deriving Bernoulli's equation via conservation of E

So I'm not OK with how some people derive this equation. These people consider a pipe whose endings have cross-sectional areas and heights which are different. They then use the conservation of ...
12
votes
4answers
6k views

Is it possible to create matter? [duplicate]

Is it possible to create matter? In a recent discussion I had, it was suggested that with enough energy in the future, "particles" could be created. It seems like this shouldn't be possible due to ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Crystal diffraction for waves vs particles

I thought that I understand the "Bragg's Law" understanding of crystal diffraction, but recently I read something that made me confused. I understand that if the planes in the crystal have ...
5
votes
3answers
888 views

What makes materials hard and strong?

This is something I have wondered for a long time. Why are some materials like steel, diamond, and even light materials like graphene stronger than others? Is it due to the strength of the ...
1
vote
2answers
124 views

On the lattice structures of graphite

My question is the following: What causes graphite to have either a cubic lattice structure or a hexagonal lattice structure? Does it depend on how it is grown? Or is it a random process? I would ...
7
votes
0answers
118 views

Topology-dependent groud state degeneracy of $B \wedge F + B \wedge B$ and $B \wedge F + B \wedge B \wedge B$

There are some examples of topological BF theory with extra terms allow it still being topological. See this Ref. paper In 4d (3+1D), we have the trace of: $$ \int\frac{k}{2\pi}\text{Tr}[B \wedge F + ...
4
votes
1answer
97 views

Symmetry breaking of the hidden sector

Lately, I have some read some papers about the hidden sector of particle physics which combines with the Standard Model through the so-called Higgs portal. Let the Lagrangian for this be composed of ...
3
votes
1answer
54 views

What is the extent of the Galactic Magnetic Field?

What is the extent of the Galactic Magnetic Field? What does the Galactic Magnetic Field look like from afar (such as half-way ...
6
votes
1answer
81 views

Minimum connectivity required for mean field to be a good approximation?

In spin models, it is known that mean field becomes a better approximation as the connectivity increases. My question is: Is there an estimate for the threshold connectivity (as a function of the ...
0
votes
1answer
182 views

Why are diodes able to amplify signals in groups, but not alone?

Single diodes can determine whether a signal passes or not (depending on the biased)(plus they can even rectify a signal), yet why does it take a combination of diodes(like a transistor) to amplify a ...
-1
votes
1answer
2k views

Throwing an object in the air [closed]

Studying formulas about velocity and acceleration I came up with a question: if I throw an object in the air with a velocity $v_0$ (suppose i throw it vertically) in how much time its final velocity ...

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