0
votes
1answer
369 views

How much energy is contained in a 40 meter wave?

Consider a wave that stands 40 meters high in the sea on very deep water. How much energy would approximately be contained in this wave if it was 100 meters wide and had been produced by wind? Is ...
2
votes
2answers
314 views

Why do balls in a spinning ellipsoid move to the minor axis plane?

There is a question concerning the Physics of a small child's tall that has been bothering me for some time now. I have investigated this to a small degree, but I have not been able to find a ...
5
votes
0answers
100 views

Can the Lamb shift be expressed in more-or-less closed form in terms of the renormalized 2-, 3-,…,n-point VEVs of QED?

I see here that there are three contributions to the Lamb shift, from vacuum polarization (-27 MHz), from electron mass renormalization(+1017 MHz), and from the anomalous magnetic moment (+68 MHz). ...
2
votes
0answers
2k views

Easy to obtain liquid with freezing point a couple of degrees above 0 Celsius [closed]

Please advice me a liquid whose freezing point is 2-5 Celsius. I know that the solution of salt in water can have freezing point of about -3 Celsius. I would like to know if similar liquid but with ...
1
vote
1answer
272 views

Crystal Field Theory

I am literally lost with this question: Suppose that within the set of (2L+1)(2S+1) lowest-lying ionic states the crystal field can be represented in the form a(L_x)^2 + b(L_y)^2 + c(L_z)^2, with ...
15
votes
6answers
726 views

Does Kaluza-Klein theory successfully unify GR and EM? Why can't it be extended to the Standard Model gauge group?

As a quick disclaimer, I thought this might be a better place to ask than Physics.SE. I already searched there with "kaluza" and "klein" keywords to find an answer, but without luck. As background, ...
7
votes
3answers
234 views

Universe is expanding at enormous speed

I'm not an expert but I've come to understand that the universe is expanding at enormous speed. That means that all of the visible galaxies are moving away from us at great speed. I also came to ...
1
vote
1answer
127 views

Different results for Magnetic field using different methods

In calculating the magnetic field created by this current at the center point of the loop using Biot-Savart and using the vector potential will there be a difference? If so what is it and why? ...
1
vote
1answer
108 views

Is the Energy Sharply or Fuzzily Defined in Quantum Mechanics?

According to quantum mechanics, energy of a state is uncertain within a small range in hydrogen atom. But we also know that energy of a state is quantized which is contradictory to the first. Which ...
-1
votes
1answer
4k views

How light years is measured? [closed]

How are light years are measured? I remember the distance between earth and moon are measured by the delay in light which travels and comes back. But how are light years calculated?
12
votes
2answers
1k views

What are bootstraps?

I've heard occasional mentions of the term "bootstraps" in connection with the S Matrix. I believe it applies to an old approach that was tried in the 1960s, whereby - well I'm not sure - but it ...
1
vote
2answers
107 views

Could a viable solar system work with a cluster of dwarf stars in center? And would it last longer than a single stellar mass star?

So, I was watching various sci channel shows, and they touch on how extremely massive stars live only 100k years, vs the sun which lives ~10 billion years, and dwarf stars live some unspecified time ...
1
vote
1answer
249 views

Average speed of seismic waves towards the center of Earth

I'm looking at an approximation of the average speed of seismic wave towards the center of Earth. The horizontal path of the waves that affects us directly is well documented, but there is not much ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

Would a high-explosive in a vacuum be less harmful?

Putting aside shrapnel effects, I believe that high-explosives cause damage by producing a shockwave. How do shockwaves work in space? I've managed to convince myself that a high-explosive shockwave ...
2
votes
2answers
13k views

Why does a gas get hot when suddenly compressed? What is happening at the molecular level?

My guess is that the molecules of gas all have the same speed as before, but now there are much more collisions per unit area onto the thermometer, thus making the thermometer read a higher ...
20
votes
3answers
7k views

How does the Higgs mechanism work?

I'm not a particle physicist, but I did manage to get through the Feynman lectures without getting too lost. Is there a way to explain how the Higgs field works, in a way that people like me might ...
10
votes
1answer
437 views

How to explain the Moon halo phenomenon?

Today, here in Brazil, I have observed (and is still observing) an interesting phenomenon. The Moon is near to a big star in the sky, but this is normal. The interesting part is what's around them. ...
4
votes
1answer
119 views

Derivatives of fluctuations about a condensate

Firstly I am not sure as to whether I am using the word "condensate" in the right context. In QFT contexts I think I see it getting used to mean the space-time independent solution which would solve ...
4
votes
3answers
1k views

What if we could give photons some mass?

I was reading an article and these paragraphs got me wondering... Before I list the replies, here is some background. The Higgs mechanism describes an invisible field that, it is argued, split one ...
1
vote
2answers
294 views

Point charge potential (sign problem)

I'm a bit embarrassed, but I'm not able to compute the electric potential at point $P$ (at a distance $R$ from the origin) generated by a positive unitary point charge in the origin with the right ...
1
vote
2answers
167 views

If a puck on ice deccelarates, is its speed “v = v0 - t * a” or is it “v = v0 -k * v0”?

I've been wondering about a puck sliding on ice or a puck in an air hockey table game. If a puck is hit and we start watching it as soon as it has reached its maximum speed and starts becoming slower, ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Sinusoidal vs exponential wave functions with Schrodinger's equation

When solving Schrodinger's equation, we end up with the following differential equation: $$\frac{{d}^{2}\psi}{dx^2} = -\frac{2m(E - V)}{\hbar}\psi$$ As I understand it, the next step is to guess the ...
4
votes
2answers
439 views

Why model space with real numbers?

Are there any good papers discussing why we use $\mathbb{R}^{3}$as a model for space? More specifically are there any that explain why we don't use other number systems such as extensions of the real ...
1
vote
1answer
180 views

Supermassive Black Holes = expansion origin?

(Sorry, couldn't resist the title) An article on Physics Today brings news that there is a new record for largest black hole (not) seen in space, some 300 million light-years away. It hints at ...
4
votes
2answers
542 views

How is the Hanbury-Brown and Twiss effect used to measure the size of stars?

I understand what an Hanbury Brown and Twiss (HBT) interferometer does, but how can this be used to measure the apparent angular diameter of some object? What is the mathematical explaination?
5
votes
3answers
395 views

How can we know, today, that there's something from 100 light-years from here?

In my understanding, to take a picture of something that is 100 light-years from here, our "camera" would have to travel 100 years at light speed, take the picture, send to us, and 100 years later we ...
0
votes
1answer
523 views

How do I get the focal length from a camera matrix?

Given the camera matrix, can I find the focal length of this camera ?
5
votes
3answers
867 views

Tensor product of Hilbert spaces and non-interacting particles

Consider a system of N quantum mechanical particles described on Hilbert spaces $\mathcal{H}_1,...,\mathcal{H}_N$ and with Hamiltonians $H_1,...,H_N$. The Hamiltonian operator $H_1$ acts on the ...
3
votes
3answers
565 views

The role of resistor in e.g. an AND gate

What is the role of the resistor in e.g. an AND gate like this one? : One often sees lots of resistors in electric circuits, but I haven't really understood their role.
0
votes
1answer
141 views

How Is Entanglement Created Among Qubits?

How are qubits entangled? I understand the basics of entanglement but what I do not get is how it occurs in nature or in the lab. What causes entanglement to occur or what is done to the particle to ...
2
votes
1answer
406 views

Is the total energy of a quantum system the sum of the particle energies?

I really should know this off by heart (this is my field...) but I never really grasped the difference between the total wavefunction of a system and the wavefunctions of particles within it, so it ...
4
votes
2answers
251 views

Uniqueness of eigenvector representation in a complete set of compatible observables [duplicate]

Possible Duplicate: Uniqueness of eigenvector representation in a complete set of compatible observables Sakurai states that if we have a complete, maximal set of compatible observables, ...
2
votes
1answer
142 views

Gravitational sphere

I was reading this article that mentions a blackhole as having a gravitational sphere of 4,000 light-years. I'd not heard of the term (gravitational sphere) before ...
1
vote
2answers
132 views

Space expansion effect on wavelengths across two points in space

Is the expansion of space taken into consideration when calculating light or any (Radio to Gamma) wave length distance and speed? I know C is a constant, but my concern is if "space expansion" is ...
5
votes
1answer
39 views

A question from Ticcati's red QFT textbook.

From Ticcati's textbook, he asks to show that from the axioms of position operator we get that: $$ \text{e}^{-ia\cdot P} |x\rangle = |x+a\rangle $$ where the axioms are: $$ X=X^{\dagger} $$ If ...
0
votes
1answer
478 views

electric dipole momentum calculation

I'm studying the linear electric susceptibility, using Schroedinger equation and perturbation theory of the interaction potential $$V=-\mu \cdot E$$ and the book arrive to an expression where ...
4
votes
3answers
904 views

Second law of thermodynamics and a bunch of magnets

Say I put a bunch of powerful square magnets on a nearly frictionless table in a disordered fashion. The second law of thermodynamics states that the system shall spontaneously get more disordered, ...
5
votes
2answers
972 views

Why are anticommutators needed in quantization of Dirac fields?

Why is the anticommutator actually needed in the canonical quantization of free Dirac field?
1
vote
2answers
311 views

What material can a lens be made from?

I need to make a camera lens that can easily withstand temperatures of about 1000 Fahrenheit. What should I make the lens out of?
6
votes
2answers
85 views

Is there any chance we could eventually observe the supernova of the first (Population III) stars

In an answer to my previous question about the first stars it was stated they probably formed at Z=20 to Z=60 and may have had a mass between tens to 100s to 1000s of times the mass of the Sun. Given ...
2
votes
1answer
324 views

What happens to a rotating rod that breaks in two?

I know that the approximation for the moment of inertia of an infinitely thin rod of mass $m$ and length $L$ spinning around an axis perpendicular to its own axis at its center is $\frac{mL^2}{3}$: ...
1
vote
2answers
321 views

Is it necessary to embed a 4D surface in 5D space?

Lets consider the line element: $$ds^2=dr^2+r^2[d\theta^2+\sin^2\theta d\phi^2]$$ There are three variables r,theta and phi. If we use a surface constraint like r=constant the number of independent ...
15
votes
10answers
259 views

In astronomy what phenomena have theory predicted before observations?

As far as I know, astronomy is generally an observational science. We see something and then try to explain why it is happening. The one exception that I know of is black holes: first it was thought ...
13
votes
4answers
858 views

Is there a limit to the resolving power of a mirror telescope?

Like, if you hammered out the asteroid 16 Psyche into a 1 mm thick iron foil disc telescope mirror with 2.4x the radius of the Sun, could you resolve details on the surface of an exoplanet? At what ...
6
votes
1answer
417 views

Defining the ground state energy of a QFT

I would like to hear of some general discussion on how is the ground state and its energy defined in QFT and how does one go about finding it. (..at least in some simple cases I have seen the use of ...
7
votes
1answer
70 views

How are exoplanets confirmed?

In reference to the Kepler 22b news: The Kepler team had to wait for three passes of the planet before upping its status from "candidate" to "confirmed". This is possible because the planet ...
3
votes
2answers
214 views

Relativity and predictability

My old theoretical physics professor used to say that (already) (special?) relativity shows that "the future is not predictable". Any ideas how this should be interpreted?
0
votes
3answers
7k views

How does evaporation affect the temperature of the air?

A wet object or a volume of water will decrease in temperature due to the effect of evaporation. We understand this to be because of the molecular kinetics, where the faster water molecules escape ...
0
votes
2answers
874 views

Basic Free Fall Problem [closed]

So I am trying to remember my childhood doing some Physics problems, but seems that I forgot almost everything. But it's not a big thing... that's why I'm training! My problem is pretty basic ...
3
votes
2answers
422 views

Uniqueness of eigenvector representation in a complete set of compatible observables

Sakurai states that if we have a complete, maximal set of compatible observables, say $A,B,C...$ Then, an eigenvector represented by $|a,b,c....>$, where $a,b,c...$ are respective eigenvalues, is ...

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